Questions tagged [modifiers]

Questions about modifiers.

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1answer
28 views

Modifying 'at risk'

There's a set phrase 'at risk.' Can the 'risk' in this set phrase be modified by something as in 'at high risk,' no separate word 'risk' being modified?
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35 views

participial phrase placement [duplicate]

In a grammar test I did, the following sentence was to be corrected: "I first spotted the turtle playing tag in the yard." It clearly contains a misplaced modifier. The correction suggested ...
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34 views

When a noun phrase can act as the post-modifier?

According to Oxford Learner's Grammar by John Eastwood [ISBN:0-19-437-597-8], page 187; it is possible for a noun phrase to act as a postmodifier of the head noun. Example: The weather that day was ...
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1answer
16 views

Is the comma needed in “additional, custom apps”?

I saw the phrase "additional, custom apps." Is the comma correct? Or would you delete the comma: "... additional custom apps ..." The whole sentence is a bit complex, so I'll give ...
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31 views

“the lady's thumb” or “lady's thumb”

According to the encyclopedical manner (and what COBUILD advises too), we should put an article, be it definite or indefinite, before the name of a plant. A rose is a plant… The coconut tree is a ...
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34 views

'As a result of' Usage

As a result of seems to be quite a versatile phrase, and I can't entirely figure out the contexts in which it is used. This statement is apparently wrong: Sound can travel through water for ...
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2answers
39 views

Adverbs in comparative clauses

I saw an anecdotal "rule" in a magazine stating that, if an adverb is used in a comparative clause, the '-ly' form of the adverb is preferable to a comparative form. Apparently however, if the adverb ...
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1answer
36 views

two groups of 10 male volunteers

The subjects were two groups of 10 male volunteers sealed into a mock spaceship for two simulated flights to Mars. (source:https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-04/mdcf-mcf041117.php ) I have ...
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50 views

Make sure you invite Jill herself(,) <too> [The syntactic function of 'too' and usage of comma]

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Pages 438-9) has this: An NP may contain more than one peripheral modifier, with multiple layers of embedding: [8] i Make sure you invite [Jill herself ...
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20 views

Finding modifier in a sentence

Given sentence: Although she didn't have much work experience, she was offered the job. Question: find the modifier. What type of modifier? Here we have a dependent clause and an independent ...
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2answers
40 views

There aren't [ many / any / no ] young people in our apartment block. (It's 'many' but… Why not 'any'?)

I have the above question in one of my classes but can't find a reason as to why the answer can't be 'There aren't any young people.... ' The only thing I can think of is if it something like you can'...
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192 views

What does “among whom” refer to?

From "Be Nice — You Won’t Finish Last" — By Sarah Maslin Nir During the rosy years of elementary school, my inclination to share my dolls and my knack with knock-knock jokes (“Who’s there?” “Tank....
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50 views

E.g. Be careful on the road. There's [ many / much / a lot of ] traffic at this time of day

I'm teaching students quantifiers and need a bit of help with this example. There's much traffic at this time of day. Is this incorrect? My feeling is that it's grammatically correct but yes, does ...
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33 views

Present participle, gerund, or modifier

Which one of the following is right? 1) I am a doctor working in a hospital. 2) I am, a doctor, working in a hospital. 3) I am a doctor, working in a hospital. Does "working" modify "doctor" in ...
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32 views

Which sentence structure is correct and why?

I have typed nearly all the sentences. I nearly have typed all the sentences. Also, do I need to add the preposition 'of' to the sentence? E.g. "I have nearly typed all of the sentences."
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37 views

“Undaunting faith and courage”--Is this usage correct?

I came across a sentence in a published book (A Light Kindled: The Story of Priscilla Mullins): "His voice echoed the urgency of the situation, yet it was strengthened with the calm resolve that only ...
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1answer
65 views

I heard <Mona singing that song> <the song sung by Mona>. [parse]

(1) I heard Mona singing that song. (2) I heard the song sung by Mona. "Mona singing that song" and "the song sung by Mona" are objects, each of which can be parsed two ways: &...
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110 views

fused relative word (whatever, whoever) + the hell/on earth

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has presented five reasons for classifying ungoverned open exhaustive conditionals not as fused relatives but as open interrogatives, and the fourth ...
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45 views

Participial Phrase as Verb Modifier?

On the internet, I only read about participial phrases acting as noun modifiers. But when I read various newspaper articles, it seems that participial phrases are also used as verb modifiers, or even ...
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12 views

Dangling modifier-like construction

In Simon Reid-Henry's recent "Empire of democracy", which is marvellous but poorly proofread, I found the following sentence: As one of its main sponsors, the Good Friday Agreement also provided ...
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44 views

Is the relative clause always an adjunct/modifier of the antecedent?

The first two sentences mean the same thing, and so do the last two. (1) She's obviously the person to finish the job. (1') She's obviously the person who should finish the job. (2) She was the first ...
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26 views

Activist vs. Activism

What is the difference between "activist" and "activism" when they are used as modifiers? What is correct - "activist project" or "activism project"?
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32 views

noun phrase and modifiers

What is the head noun and pre-modifier and post-modifier in the given noun phrase "various types of media on inteligence and learning ability"? it seem like "media" is the head noun. Am I right? If ...
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64 views

past-participle–modifier placement

Consider the two sentences: The number of the analyzed data sheets exceeds 1000. The number of the data sheets analyzed exceeds 1000. Which position of the past participle "analyzed" is ...
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63 views

Can a noun functioning as modifier of an NP fuse with the head?

In a section titled "Fused modifier-heads", A Student's Introduction to English Grammar says: The modifiers which most readily fuse with the head include these: •   determinatives used in ...
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116 views

complement vs adjunct/modifier

In the following noun phrase, is the prepositional phrase from Lloyds complement or adjunct/modifier? even all the preposterous salary from Lloyds that Bill gets The Cambridge Grammar of The ...
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479 views

What's the difference between adjuncts and modifiers?

All types of adjuncts (my conclusion from wikipedia.org): An adnominal adjunct is an adjunct modifying noun, i.e. it's dependent words in noun phrases (a good boy, the discussion before the game). ...
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65 views

Would this sentence be considered grammatically correct [closed]

A sci-fi middle-grade suspense novel about a 14-year-old girl who must retrieve the stone, preventing the rise of a human nuclear weapon.
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1answer
64 views

Can an adjective modify the entire sentence?

I came across the following sentence, and I was so curious about “effective next Monday.” Mr. Michael has resigned his position as senior sales manager, effective next Monday. Effective is ...
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70 views

Which modifies which

He took his son back to school. Does to school modifies back or the other way around?
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4answers
1k views

What is the difference between an adjective and a noun modifier?

"My tire was damaged. I took the damaged tire to the garage." In the above example, the book (summit) refers to the past participles of the transitive verbs as "noun modifiers" and not "adjectives". ...
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50 views

“there exists” or “S exists”

In the formal writing such as a conference/journal paper, which of the following two phrases are correct? there exists noun Noun exists In addition, can we use the following phrases to modify the ...
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1answer
140 views

Should I use a hyphen with a latin phrase that modifies an adjective that modifies a noun?

I understand that Latin phrases are not normally hyphenated. I also understand that adjective-modifying adverbs normally do receive a hyphen (despite this parenthetically invoked exception). So, which ...
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91 views

Do you use a subject pronoun or object pronoun before or in a gerundial modifier?

For example: The Pope became the anointed leader of kings and emperors, they becoming his subjects. -or- The Pope became the anointed leader of kings and emperors, them becoming his ...
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376 views

Is the word solvent in “solvent mixture” used as a noun or an adjective?

when I say a solvent mixture in chemistry, I found several references that say both "solvents mixture" and "solvent mixture". I wonder if the word solvent is modifying as a noun or an adjective. If ...
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295 views

What part of speech is “almost” when applied to an adjective? [closed]

If I say that "the box is almost flat" what part of speech is "almost"? I can't say "the box is almost", so it does not appear to be an adjective itself. It seems to be a word that modifies the ...
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35 views

Hear it used this way? - Complement or Modifier

While writing the following sentence I was curious whether the sentence was correct. But after checking COCA, I came to now that similar expressions are in use. The sentence I wrote is: Have you ...
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1answer
19 views

How would you punctuate this?

I've come across a heading I don't know how to punctuate: 10 Questions for Betty Smith – Author, Chocolate and Money Lover Obviously she is a lover of chocolate and money, but am not sure how/...
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4answers
211 views

A modifier clause after “one of the xxxs” – singular or plural?

I wrote a sentence of the kind "XXX contains one of the most powerful lubricants that prevent rusty gears, the main cause of machine failure." This is too wordy, of course, but never mind. The grammar ...
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50 views

Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
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1answer
88 views

On using a modifier with a (comma-separated) list

I have a couple of related questions, one of which is a concrete question and the other of which is more general/abstract. My first question is in regards to the following sentence, which was taken ...
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2answers
252 views

What is the nature of, and syntactic distinction between, modifier and complement?

I am struggling to understand the syntactic relevance of the distinction between complement and modifier in theories such as the one presented in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by ...
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2answers
77 views

When referring to two people who have passed on, is it necessary to repeat “the late”?

Which one is correct? A. Authors like the late John Smith and John Doe have … B. Authors like the late John Smith and the late John Doe have … Thanks
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Can a prepositional phrase modify a noun when there is a verb between the noun and the prepositional phrase?

For example, Forecasts have emerged of heavy rain. A structurally sound argument was presented of the characteristics and implications of economic recessions. Is the prepositional phrase modifying &...
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1answer
92 views

What part of speech is the word hair in 'hair spray'? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence as an example. I used some hair spray. What part of speech is hair? Intuitively, I want to say it's an adjective modifying spray since hair spray is two separate words ...
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1answer
48 views

“Personal Use Program” or “Personal-Use Program”?

Help me settle a discussion on this topic. Everywhere I look, within my company's internal documents as well as documents from other companies, a "personal use" program is not hyphenated. A colleague ...
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1answer
286 views

What's the FUNCTIONAL difference between a supplement and an adjunct/modifier?

I'm trying to understand the difference between supplements and adjuncts/modifiers. In my search for enlightenment, I've come across a number of entries and posts, of which I think this one summarises ...
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1answer
276 views

How to tell which word a prepositional phrase is modifying?

Often it is obvious what word is being modified by a prepositional phrase, but sometimes it isn't. When it's not immediately clear, I often ask myself questions like: Does this phrase answer "where ...
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1answer
146 views

Determining licensing in CaGel by means of substitution test

I read a comment on licensing in another post, which made me revisit this concept. Unfortunately I haven't got access to CaGEL – only to its "little brother", Huddleston and Pullum's A Student's ...
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2answers
139 views

Indirect complement or postmodifier in NP

In the sentence [1] He is the most talented artist (that) I know what is (that) I know in terms of function – an indirect complement, licensed by most, or simply a common postmodifier? Why? ...

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