Questions tagged [modifiers]

Questions about modifiers.

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Adverbs of manner modifying adjectives

I’m confused on adverbs of manner because it seems like some can modify adjectives while other cannot. Why is this? The book was beautifully profound. The book was quickly profound. The first ...
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31 views

Modification of adjectives

In a phrase like “the big wood piece” I know big modifies the nominal “wood piece”, but what would happen if it’s written differently? In phrases like “big piece of wood” or “best time of my life” do ...
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Correct way to convey "reducing" a trade-off

I am writing a scientific paper. In my field, there is typically a trade-off between the robustness and speed of an algorithm. I have developed an algorithm where the trade-off isn't as bad as in ...
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What does the adverb as modify in this sentence?

“The man is as tired as a sloth.” In this sentence, I know the first “as” modifies tired, but what does the second one modify?
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Adverb in a prepositional phrase and what it modifies

I am with arguably the best basketball player in the nation. Would this sentence above be correct, and if so, what does “arguably” modify?
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What is being modified in a phrase like rock hard or water resistant?

“The water-resistant shoes are great for rainy days.” “The table is rock hard.” In these sentences, I know “water resistant” modifies shoes and rock hard modifies table. Does “hard” modify “rock” and ...
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60 views

Can appositives rename a verb?

While researching, I discovered the existence of 'summative' and 'resumptive' modifiers, which are both types of appositive. For context, here is an example of a summative modifier: He saw the ...
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Does the dangling modifier thing apply?

I have a persistent question concerning grammar that I would really like your help on. It has been nagging me for a long time. So, as we all know, if you start a sentence with -ing, the first word of ...
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42 views

Are adjectives and adverbs just collapsed version of adjuncts?

Modifiers for verbs/ nouns can come in 3 main types: adjectives, adverbs & adjuncts. These all provide specific details about corresponding noun/ verbs e.g: Manner, means (instrumental) - with, ...
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Word for collective followers of Sisyphus

I am looking for a single word to describe the group of followers of Sisyphus (or generally any Greek name ending in '-phus'). I am unsure of how to modify the word to achieve this. Possible guesses: ...
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44 views

Noun adjuncts or complements? [duplicate]

I asked a question regarding PP complements the other day and I believe I now have a better handle on that. But I am still scratching my head over this paragraph from CGEL: Within the category of ...
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How can I tell if a prepositional phrase is a complement to a noun or a modifier? And how are these two different?

In the NP "mines in wartime", "in wartime" modifies the head "mines". that nice tall man from Canada whom you met "from Canada" modifies "man". But ...
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Struggling to look at grammatical modifiers

I have a passion for English, and I am trying to improve my fluency day by day. Today, I am quite confused when my teacher, a non-native speaker of English, tells me that a sentence in my essay is ...
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71 views

"To comprehend x, it is necessary to understand y." Is this a dangling modifier?

Because I often think of sentences in the "we must"-form, as in: "To comprehend x, we must first understand y." when I write things that demand I do not write "we," I ...
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20 views

Can abbreviations be used as stand-alone adjectives when the abbreviated term couldn't?

I see by your name that you are probably ESL... ESL stands for "English as a second language". In the above sentence, it is being used as a stand-alone adjective, but I'm not sure if that ...
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33 views

Multiple non-restrictive modifiers in one sentence

Consider the following sentence: "I have not sent any further communication, since the email, to your office, so far." Would both the phrases "since the email" and "to your ...
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25 views

Schoolchildren population or schoolchild population?

Although we are taught to use singular adjectives to modify nouns, "schoolchildren" population seems to be a more commonly heard and searched (Google) option than the true singular "...
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79 views

"I am happy because I am rich." Exactly which part does the subordinate clause modify?

"I am happy because I am rich." Is it the adjective "happy" or the verb "am" or the entire predicate "am happy" that the subordinate clause "because I am ...
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1answer
76 views

Could someone deconstruct this sentence and explain where it is right or wrong grammatically?

The sentence is: I'm of the fuck covid opinion. A friend of mine stated it and I would like to know if someone could explain why it should or should not be written differently.
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declining reputation, worsening reputation

I am trying to write a two-word phrase. The second word is "reputation." The first word is a modifier; it will signal that a reputation is getting worse. "Worsening reputation" ...
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3answers
86 views

Word for "many" for mass nouns

I'm looking for a strong size modifier like "numerous", "countless", or "copious" that I can use to modify a mass noun. I know of plenty of options that involve several ...
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67 views

Compound modifier with adverb [duplicate]

In the phrase "highly trained support specialist" should a hyphen be used?
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78 views

Can't see a sentence correction

To work as a loan officer, an education in financial planning is required. I don't see a grammar mistake in the above sentence, if there is any?
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placement of "only"

Example: I will buy fish only if I shop at the pier Does the placement of the "only" make the sentence ambiguous so that multiple readings of this sentence is possible? Which word is "...
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67 views

Why is "more complicated" typically not hyphenated as a compound modifier when before a noun?

In the phrase "employees for more complicated work," shouldn't "more complicated" be hyphenated as it comes before the noun it describes? After much searching online, I am yet to ...
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453 views

Can I use an adjective as a modifier at the beginning of a sentence?

For instance, Angry, I smashed his head into the wall Or should it be Angrily, I smashed his head into the wall
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53 views

Does a modifier before a conjunction like `and` apply to both the subjects of `and`?

Suppose I have the following sentence: a work is classical by reason of its resistance to contemporaneity and supposed universality How should one go about comprehending the bold part in it? Which ...
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35 views

Modifying a whole list of nouns by attaching modifier to the first noun only

With sentences like: I visited the parks in the area, museums, and shops. We enjoyed dancing on our wedding day, chatting to guests, and listening to the band. He spoke to all the boys in the ...
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64 views

What do adverbs modify and can it be ambiguous?

I have two questions, but first consider the following sentence: Cutlery includes any hand implement used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food in Western culture. Does adverb '...
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44 views

participial phrase placement [duplicate]

In a grammar test I did, the following sentence was to be corrected: "I first spotted the turtle playing tag in the yard." It clearly contains a misplaced modifier. The correction suggested ...
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126 views

When a noun phrase can act as the post-modifier?

According to Oxford Learner's Grammar by John Eastwood [ISBN:0-19-437-597-8], page 187; it is possible for a noun phrase to act as a postmodifier of the head noun. Example: The weather that day was ...
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18 views

Is the comma needed in "additional, custom apps"?

I saw the phrase "additional, custom apps." Is the comma correct? Or would you delete the comma: "... additional custom apps ..." The whole sentence is a bit complex, so I'll give ...
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36 views

"the lady's thumb" or "lady's thumb"

According to the encyclopedical manner (and what COBUILD advises too), we should put an article, be it definite or indefinite, before the name of a plant. A rose is a plant… The coconut tree is a ...
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117 views

'As a result of' Usage

As a result of seems to be quite a versatile phrase, and I can't entirely figure out the contexts in which it is used. This statement is apparently wrong: Sound can travel through water for ...
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56 views

Adverbs in comparative clauses

I saw an anecdotal "rule" in a magazine stating that, if an adverb is used in a comparative clause, the '-ly' form of the adverb is preferable to a comparative form. Apparently however, if the adverb ...
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two groups of 10 male volunteers

The subjects were two groups of 10 male volunteers sealed into a mock spaceship for two simulated flights to Mars. (source:https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-04/mdcf-mcf041117.php ) I have ...
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Make sure you invite Jill herself(,) <too> [The syntactic function of 'too' and usage of comma]

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Pages 438-9) has this: An NP may contain more than one peripheral modifier, with multiple layers of embedding: [8] i Make sure you invite [Jill herself ...
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1answer
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Finding modifier in a sentence

Given sentence: Although she didn't have much work experience, she was offered the job. Question: find the modifier. What type of modifier? Here we have a dependent clause and an independent ...
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186 views

There aren't [ many / any / no ] young people in our apartment block. (It's 'many' but..... Why not 'any'?)

I have the above question in one of my classes but can't find a reason as to why the answer can't be 'There aren't any young people.... ' The only thing I can think of is if it something like you can'...
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1answer
251 views

What does "among whom" refer to?

From "Be Nice — You Won’t Finish Last" — By Sarah Maslin Nir During the rosy years of elementary school, my inclination to share my dolls and my knack with knock-knock jokes (“Who’s there?” “Tank....
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970 views

E.g. Be careful on the road. There's [ many / much / a lot of ] traffic at this time of day

I'm teaching students quantifiers and need a bit of help with this example. There's much traffic at this time of day. Is this incorrect? My feeling is that it's grammatically correct but yes, does ...
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37 views

Present participle, gerund, or modifier

Which one of the following is right? 1) I am a doctor working in a hospital. 2) I am, a doctor, working in a hospital. 3) I am a doctor, working in a hospital. Does "working" modify "doctor" in ...
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34 views

Which sentence structure is correct and why?

I have typed nearly all the sentences. I nearly have typed all the sentences. Also, do I need to add the preposition 'of' to the sentence? E.g. "I have nearly typed all of the sentences."
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111 views

"Undaunting faith and courage"--Is this usage correct?

I came across a sentence in a published book (A Light Kindled: The Story of Priscilla Mullins): "His voice echoed the urgency of the situation, yet it was strengthened with the calm resolve that only ...
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1answer
111 views

I heard <Mona singing that song> <the song sung by Mona>. [parse]

(1) I heard Mona singing that song. (2) I heard the song sung by Mona. "Mona singing that song" and "the song sung by Mona" are objects, each of which can be parsed two ways: &...
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126 views

fused relative word (whatever, whoever) + the hell/on earth

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has presented five reasons for classifying ungoverned open exhaustive conditionals not as fused relatives but as open interrogatives, and the fourth ...
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51 views

Participial Phrase as Verb Modifier?

On the internet, I only read about participial phrases acting as noun modifiers. But when I read various newspaper articles, it seems that participial phrases are also used as verb modifiers, or even ...
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171 views

Is the relative clause always an adjunct/modifier of the antecedent?

The first two sentences mean the same thing, and so do the last two. (1) She's obviously the person to finish the job. (1') She's obviously the person who should finish the job. (2) She was the first ...
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29 views

Activist vs. Activism

What is the difference between "activist" and "activism" when they are used as modifiers? What is correct - "activist project" or "activism project"?
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73 views

past-participle–modifier placement [duplicate]

Consider the two sentences: The number of the analyzed data sheets exceeds 1000. The number of the data sheets analyzed exceeds 1000. Which position of the past participle "analyzed" is ...

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