Questions tagged [modifiers]

Questions about modifiers.

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28
votes
3answers
4k views

Is it correct to hyphenate with compound premodifiers? If so, where is the hyphen placed?

For example, "file system" and "related". Is it "file system-related"? It will appear as if it is a compound of "file" and "system-related", won't it?
15
votes
3answers
123k views

Should “two weeks vacation” be written “two weeks’ vacation” with a possessive apostrophe?

I’ve always understood that the phrase two weeks usually turns into two weeks’ when used as a modifier as in I’m giving my two weeks’ notice. I get two weeks’ vacation. (“two weeks’ holiday” for ...
45
votes
5answers
101k views

Should I use " related" or "-related"

What is the correct use of the term "related?" For example, should I use it like computer related, or is it more proper to use computer-related (where the word "computer" is just part of my example?)...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Explanation on when the possessive should be used instead of an attributive noun

How would you explain to a person who is learning English, and whose native language does not have attributive nouns, when the possessive should be used instead of an attributive noun? In particular, ...
17
votes
3answers
15k views

Using "non-" to prefix a two-word phrase

Does "non-" prefixed to a two word phrase permit another hyphen before the second word? If I want to refer to an entity which is defined as the negation of another entity by attaching "non-" it seems ...
11
votes
3answers
21k views

Hyphen or no hyphen when modifying an adjective with a quantity?

I have a sentence which has an object that is described with an adjective: We need to inform our interested patrons of this change. If I modify "interested" with "more" or "less", do I connect the ...
0
votes
1answer
608 views

Can a participle phrase modify a clause?

It is generally taught that participial/participle phrases function as adjectives modifying a noun (or pronoun). In a sentence such as: A major accident occurred on our bus's route to school, ...
8
votes
3answers
220 views

Is a dark polka dot necktie dark?

In The Syntactic Phenomena of English, McCawley considers the phrase "a dark blue necktie", and concludes that "blue" in that phrase is simultaneously a noun and an adjective. It modifies the noun ...
8
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2answers
588 views

Chainsaw-equipped or chainsaw equipped?

Is it chainsaw-equipped or chainsaw equipped? And with what kind of former words to use "-" properly?
7
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3answers
2k views

Could you help me to do a syntax analysis of this sentence?

The more I use Froyo the more new stuff I discover. Does it mean: I more use Froyo, I discover more new stuff.
12
votes
3answers
14k views

How should a multiple-word noun be punctuated within a compound adjective? [duplicate]

I would like to use a noun made of multiple words (like particle board, Mount Everest, or windscreen wiper) in a compound adjective with a hyphen. But I don't know how to hyphenate such a composition....
12
votes
4answers
22k views

Origin of the "-y" or "-ie" diminutive suffix to denote intimacy/tenderness? (E.g. Bob→Bobby, dad→daddy, Doug→Dougie)

Many names seem to get a "-y" or "-ie" at the end when the speaker wishes to denote a hint of familiarity, intimacy, or tenderness. Examples can be seen not just in names, but in terms like puppy, ...
5
votes
2answers
920 views

Should "gerund + objective" be modified by adjectives or adverbs?

I read from TheFreeDictionary http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Gerunds.htm the examples "Studying too hastily will result in a poor grade." and "Working from home allows me to spend more time with my ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Plural modifying noun [duplicate]

Where can I learn about the English rules for noun phrases in which a modifying noun is semantically plural? We say "Horse trainer," not "horses trainer", even though there is usually more than one ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

"One-Day Only Promotion" or "One-Day-Only Promotion"

A copywriter I'm working with wrote "One-Day Only Promotion" but my feeling is that "One-Day-Only Promotion" is correct. The first three words describe 'Promotion'. I know you don't hyphenate adverbs, ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

The Order of Modification in English Nouns, Preceding or Succeeding? [closed]

As I don't know the exact linguistic terms, what I mean my "preceding" and "succeeding" in modifying nouns is as follows. Preceding : delicious food, long way, kind person, et cetera Succeeding : ...
45
votes
13answers
16k views

Does "so called" have a negative connotation in English?

In some languages the word-by-word translation of "so called" usually has a neutral connotation. E.g. in the Czech language you may very often find a sentence like this (word-by-word translated from a ...
16
votes
3answers
3k views

Can the verb 'be' be modified?

Comments on this question considered whether the verb be could be modified by an adverb. This seems a question worth pursuing in its own right, so may I ask what completely modifies in the following ...
7
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4answers
14k views

Is it correct to write "a 5-mm-thick layer"?

Do I need hyphens? Should I use the indefinite article or zero article?
5
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6answers
893 views

In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun?

I thought I'd post this as it illustrates a problem often encountered on ELU. In structures such as 'football manager', is 'football' a modifier or a complement of the head noun? I've seen both ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the difference between adjuncts and modifiers?

All types of adjuncts (my conclusion from wikipedia.org): An adnominal adjunct is an adjunct modifying noun, i.e. it's dependent words in noun phrases (a good boy, the discussion before the game). ...
1
vote
4answers
713 views

Should there be a comma in 'a 30-day, money-back guarantee'?

Is a comma needed in the following phrases? 30-day, money-back guarantee 90-day, no-risk trial If so, why? If not, why not? I've seen them written both ways — with and without the comma &...
1
vote
3answers
362 views

Postmodification using participle: Is it grammatical?

I am a Japanese teacher of English who is making a teaching material for my students. I would like to know whether the following usage would be totally accepted in school grammar. To put my question ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Removing modifier error

The modifier error in the sentence below creates ambiguity regarding who is on the way home - John or the huge man. John saw a huge man on his way home What are the different ways to fix this? ...
9
votes
3answers
137k views

Are "way better" and "way more" correct?

"Way better" and "way more" are popular expressions, but they both seem incorrect to me. "Far better", "far more", "much better", and "much more" all seem correct. Is this true? If so, why?
39
votes
6answers
12k views

The intensifier 'pure D': where and when did it originate, and what does the D stand for?

A posting in my Facebook timeline today began "I've been sorting boxes of Pure D-Crap." The poster was writing from Alameda, California (near San Francisco). It struck me that I hadn't heard ...
5
votes
2answers
308 views

What is the nature of, and syntactic distinction between, modifier and complement?

I am struggling to understand the syntactic relevance of the distinction between complement and modifier in theories such as the one presented in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by ...
7
votes
3answers
578 views

How to determine if a "[something] fighter" fights for or against [something]?

In freedom fighter the fighter supports freedom. In fire fighter the fighter fights fire. How do you determine when it is the first or the second case? What is the meaning of spam fighter? @...
5
votes
1answer
154 views

Determining licensing in CaGel by means of substitution test

I read a comment on licensing in another post, which made me revisit this concept. Unfortunately I haven't got access to CaGEL – only to its "little brother", Huddleston and Pullum's A Student's ...
3
votes
3answers
927 views

Does "Predicate" includes object, complement and modifiers?

I'm currently studying the "Sentence Structure" for the English language. I've found varied information in this regard. Some sources says that the sentence consist of five components: Subject + ...
2
votes
1answer
877 views

How to tell which word a prepositional phrase is modifying?

Often it is obvious what word is being modified by a prepositional phrase, but sometimes it isn't. When it's not immediately clear, I often ask myself questions like: Does this phrase answer "where ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Differences between "very" and "very much" as adjective modifiers

The following examples are clearly wrong: × I am very much tired × She is very much clever But the following sounds fine (at least according to OALD): I am very much afraid that ... I am ...
1
vote
1answer
400 views

A confusing example of Noun Modifiers

I have an example of Modification of Nouns in English from a realy valid book.It says there are two types of modifiers:adj. modifiers, and noun modifiers but it gives an example on both sides which is ...
1
vote
1answer
979 views

"User's expertise" or "user expertise"?

What is the correct form when referring to the expertise of a user (e.g. in programming, writing)? user's expertise user expertise
0
votes
1answer
211 views

Which clauses with phrases

Can which clause modify participle phrases? Which clause is usually used for summarizing or explaining the clause before it. 1 His wife was stunning, which was always his pride. 2 I left the ...
0
votes
2answers
657 views

What does an adjunct modify?

Does an adjunct always modify the noun or can it modify the verb, too? For example: He talked about me [in a hateful way]. I don't think that saying "in a hateful way" modifies him would be true. ...
1
vote
2answers
5k views

How do you modify an adverb with another adverb?

This is the case I have in mind. I wish to express that impact acted in a way that was severely adverse. It impacted her severely adversely. The proposed text above doesn't feel right at all, ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

How can I tell if a prepositional phrase is a complement to a noun or a modifier? And how are these two different?

In the NP "mines in wartime", "in wartime" modifies the head "mines". that nice tall man from Canada whom you met "from Canada" modifies "man". But ...
0
votes
2answers
593 views

"the below-identified person": Term for this style and any style guides regarding

Are there any technical terms to specifically describe the two styles (A and B) below? Also, are there any prescriptive style guides that say which is preferable? My own preference is for style B ...
0
votes
3answers
139 views

“Terrified, John locked the door” — Is the comma necessary?

Which one would sound better? Terrified, John locked the door and switched off the lights. OR Terrified John locked the door and switched off the lights.
0
votes
1answer
276 views

Adverbial modifier with the insertion of comma

I was studying about participles and one site a guy asked the following question: How would the meaning of the following sentences differ from each other? 1. The beach, located on the far side of ...