Questions tagged [middle-english]

Middle English is the period in the history of the English language between the High and Late Middle Ages, or roughly during the four centuries between the late 11th and the late 15th century.

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Confusion b/w Sit and seat? [closed]

I asked my teacher - "Where do you sit?" and she replied - "I am seating in 5th floor building no. 2". Is my sentence correct? And what about hers? Why is the word "seating" used by her?
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What was the role of “compound” verbs in Middle English?

I was just reading a book where it is said that when perfect started to acquire modern meanings, "compound" verbs appeared. Here are some examples (I`m assuming with "compound" verbs on the right): ...
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What is the meaning of prefix -y in the following examples? [duplicate]

These are some exmaples from Choser: 1)He was war of me, how у stood Before hym and did of myn hood, And had ygret hym as I best koude. 2)A certein tresor that she thider ladde, And, sooth to ...
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Meaning of “See who by grace see may”

I am reading an English text in an old book and it reads: See who by grace see may, for the feeling of this is endless bliss, and the contrary is endless pain. This is the original text: See, ...
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Past tense questions in Middle English

I am attempting to ask a question that would be in past tense using middle English. The specific question is of the form “Person, where did you find this thing?” I was not able to find much about ...
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The Middle English infinitive form

Why do the Middle English words, that stay after "to" haven't got the Middle English infinitive ending "n"? Wycliffe's Bible Luke.16:3 Studylight: "And the baili seide with ynne him silf, What ...
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What does Middle English “yreyn” mean?

What does Middle English “yreyn” mean? Wycliffe's Bible Isaiah.59:5 Studylight: "Thei han broke eiren of snakis, and maden webbis of an yreyn; he that etith of the eiren of hem, schal die, and ...
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What does the Middle English “un” ending mean?

As I understood the Middle English "un" ending means possessive Pronouns (ourun), third-person plural past participle (fallun, comun, wonnun) or having the quality of (wollun, lynun, goldun, stonun). ...
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What does Middle English “cheping” mean?

What does Middle English “cheping” mean? Wycliffe's Bible (page 26) Mt.11:16 Studylight: "But to whom schal Y gesse this generacioun lijk? It is lijk to children sittynge in chepyng, that crien to ...
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Do words with “ij” (strijf, whijt, prijs, wijf, lijf, lijk, chijld) relate to Middle English?

Do words with "ij" (strijf, whijt, prijs, wijf, lijf, lijk, chijld) relate to Middle English? They are used in Wycliffe's Bible, but I don't see them at etymonline or wiktionary
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What is the Middle English letter?

What is the Middle English letter? Wycliffe's Bible (page 16) Mt.5:27 Studylight: "Ye han herd that it was seid to elde men, Thou schalt `do no letcherie." King James Bible: "Ye have heard that ...
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What is the letter combination?

What is the Middle English letter combination? In Mk.9:4 Studylight says it is "pp", but in Mt.21:26 it is not "pp". Wycliffe's Bible (page 76) Mk.9:4 Studylight: "...and Helie with Moises ...
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Spelling of Middle English “narrow”

What is Middle English spelling of "narrow"? Studylight says "narwy", but in my opinion the forth letter is "r". Wycliffe's Bible (page 19) Mt.7:14 Studylight: "...hou streit is the yate, and ...
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Does Middle English “w” relate to “uȝ”?

Does Middle English "w" relate to "uȝ"? plow plouȝ enow enouȝ raw rouȝ draw drouȝ tow touȝ
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What does Middle English “bihiȝten” mean?

What does Middle English "bihiȝten" mean? Wycliffe's Bible (page 87) Mk.14:11 Studylight: "And thei herden, and ioyeden, and bihiyten to yyue hym money. And he souyt hou he schulde bitraye hym ...
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What is the difference between “if” and “ȝif”?

What is the difference between Middle English "if" and "ȝif"? Wycliffe Bible Mt.6:23 In accordance with studylight.org: "...bodi shal be liytful; 23 but if thin iye be weiward, al thi bodi shal be ...
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In 1395, why was “her” used instead of “their”?

Why was "her" used here? Wycliffe Bible Mk.1:20 In accordance with studylight.org: "...brother, in a boot makynge nettis. 20 And anoon he clepide hem; and thei leften Zebedee, her fadir, in the ...
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What is this word in a sample of blackletter script?

What is this word "seneney"? Am I right?
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How does the “reverse syntax” in Middle English work?

I was reading the Romance of Tristan and I came across the passage: "Therefore did Tristan claim justice and the right of battle and therefore was he careful to fail in nothing of the homage he owed ...
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A name/word suggestion for person who travels the world and collects rare items of decor/furniture

For a project that I am doing, I need a name or word suggestion. The premise is that a individual is an explorer, or a traveller on adventures to far flung places, and collects & finds unique ...
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The meaning of the Middle English word “king” [closed]

Why was the word (?verb?) "king" used in this (page 63) Mk.2:6 part of the Wycliffe Bible? The King James Version Mk.2:6 But there were certain of the scribes sitting there, and reasoning in their ...
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The etymology and the Middle English spelling of “beginning” [closed]

This question is about historical spelling, but in my opinion the knowledge of the historical spelling relates with the etymology knowledge. The questions are: 1. Is the fourth letter in image 1 (y) ...
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How is 'wl-' pronounced?

How is 'wl-' pronounced at the beginning of a word? Of course, you just don't pronounce it at all, because there is no English word that begins that way and if there were, well, that's just not ...
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A Dictionary for English used by poets like Chaucer

I am trying to read Canterbury tales by Chaucer. Now, I am not a native English speaker. So, the trouble I had in reading it goes like this. Take the beginning, "Whan that Aprille with his shoures ...
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When did “awkwarde” mean “backhanded”?

In an old tale about Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne this can be read: Robin thought on Our Lady deere, And soone leapt vp againe, And thus he came with an awkwarde stroke; Good Sir Guy hee ...
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Was “lukewarm” a way of saying “warm warm”?

Someone used the expression “un-hot question” to describe a post that was in the HNQ (Hot Network Questions) despite not being “hot”. And my thoughts immediately turned to alternatives such as, ‘tepid’...
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If you had a list of common words from Middle and Modern English, how many words would have been replaced?

If you compiled a list of common Middle English words and their corresponding Modern English translations, how many entries would have been replaced by an etymologically distinct word in Modern ...
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Where did the word “brat” in reference to a spoiled child originate?

I've heard that the etymology is unknown as the original word refers to a garment and the old English word bratt a cloak. None of these seem to point to how it came to be used derogatorily.
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Has there been any theory on the vowel /o/ that was inserted into words like “arrow”?

Words like tomorrow, sorrow, arrow, follow, borough contain /o/, as in the diphthong /oʊ/, which was /wə(n)/ in Middle English which was weakened from Old English /x/ or /ɣ/ + some sort of vowel. ...
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Middle English pronunciation of digraphs

I was reading Chaucer and I am unsure on the pronunciation of "ch" and "wh". It's written in the guide that all "ch" is read as in "church" and it makes sense in words like "chivalrye", but sounds ...
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Pronunciation and syllables of pre-Modern English “belewe”?

I know the word "belewe" from traditional astronomy as a precursor to the phrase "blue moon", also known as the "betrayer" thirteenth moon in one of every three years that would disrupt a lunar ...
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“an smyte hem in pecys” in English?

I was looking at a recipe for "Vele, kede, or henne in Bokenade" from a 15th century cookery book, but am confused by the words "smyte" and "pecys" in the following phrase: an smyte hem in pecys ...
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Vocative case and plural - 'thou art' [duplicate]

In a previous question about the English of the KJV a link was helpfully supplied and I read the following The vocative case is used when directly addressing a person with a noun identifying the ...
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How is “burial” incorrectly formed?

OED says that: Middle English buryel, biriel, incorrectly formed as a singular of byriels, buriels n., q.v.; in later times associated with nouns in -al from French, such as espousal-s. Etymonline....
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How did “stroke” become the verb “strike” to mean “deal a blow”?

I've just been looking up the etymology of the word "strike," as in “The pedestrian was struck by a vehicle.” (I was curious about why we always seem to use "struck" in this situation). A quick ...
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Why does the past tense form of sleep have a weak suffix?

Meaning: to sleep is a strong verb in the Germanic languages. While I'm quite aware that strong vs weak anything has very little bearing on modern English, this is still something that puzzles me. ...
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When did the South start using the +es third person, present tense verb inflection in Middle English?

In Middle English the Northern speakers started using the +es inflection whilst the South continued to use the Old English form +eð/+eth. When did the South finally catch up with the North and use the ...
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When did all-caps formatting come to indicate shouting?

A question on the History stack discusses when all-caps formatting came to indicate shouting in digital text, the answer being that such formatting has been interpreted to indicate shouting long ...
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Pronunciation of Middle English

In Britten's "Deo Gracias" (from A Ceremony of Carols) there are a few sentences and words which I don't really know how to pronounce: clerkes finden the appil take ben that appil take was
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Is “giddy” derived from “Gid” which was Middle English for “God”?

Recently I posted an answer about the etymology of goodbye, in that answer I included a reference that cited Gid be with you, which was dated 1400-1499. The phrase was mentioned in Diachronic ...
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Is there a name for the meetings between kings and peasants?

In the middle ages, or in fiction, when the king holds a ceremony of sorts to meet with commoners and disscuss their issues one by one, is there a word for that, or a common name that could be ...
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To make fiaunce to someone

From Le Morte d'Arthur: (modern edition) And when Sir Ector was come he made fiaunce to the king for to nourish the child like as the king desired; (original edition) And whan syre Ector ...
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Meaning of “the kynge gaf hem leue for fayne wold he haue ben accorded with her”

Here is a fragment of Le Morte d'Arthur by Sir Thomas Malory: Thenne alle the barons by one assent prayd the Kynge of accord betwixe the lady Igrayne and hym / the kynge gaf hem leue / for fayne ...
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What was Ꝧ (thorn with stroke through descender) used for in middle/old english?

I was doing some research online and I saw that a thorn with a slash through the ascender was a common abbreviation for "that," but the same website (wikipedia) also listed this character: "Ꝧ". What ...
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In Early Modern English, is “beest” subjunctive or dialectal?

I am looking for better ways to translate between German and English, and I prefer Early Modern Engliſh, as a mode of speech, but mainly in written form, and I found out the other day that the ...
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Why are there so many words of apparent (Middle) Dutch origin in English?

I've observed over many occasions of looking up etymologies for words that so many words that entered English during the Middle English and Early Modern period (I don't know the figures) were of ...
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What language is this OED entry in?

I came across this citation in the OED entry1 for fag (4th meaning, "a knot in cloth"): 1464 Act. 4 Edw. IV, c. i, ― En cas que ascune autiel diversite ou Rawe, Skawe, cokell ou fagge, aveigne ...
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Does the word “spicy” predate the Columbian exchange, and if so, in which ways was it used?

Europe did not have any kind of capsicum or chili pepper before the Columbian exchange of the 15th and 16th centuries. These days many people feel that the word "spicy" only describes the kind of "...
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What was a century called before it was called “century”?

The term century in the more common connotation that refers to a period of 100 years is relatively recent: The Modern English meaning is attested from 1650s, short for century of years (1620s). ...
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What is the meaning of “rage,” in this exchange

Merriam-Webster (on line) offers no help with the meaning of "rage" (verb) in this context; "swage" is presumably 'assuage' (fade). Youthe speke to his selfe & sayd: With women me lyst both ...