Questions tagged [medical]

Questions about the use of English in medical situations

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28
votes
6answers
6k views

Is “allopathy” pejorative?

Is using the term "allopathy" to describe mainstream (i.e. real) medicine, pejorative? I know the term was originally used by homeopaths to insult real medicine, but I have heard it being used more ...
18
votes
4answers
58k views

What is the origin of “stat”?

When watching medical television shows, I often hear the doctors (actors) using the term "stat", which I understand to mean "do [action] quickly/immediately". Where did this term originate, and where ...
14
votes
2answers
4k views

Is there a term for a disease that is spread ONLY from person to person?

I'm looking for a term to describe a disease that is spread ONLY from person to person, not from animal to person (zoonosis): Zoonosis: any disease of animals communicable to humans (Dictionary.com)...
12
votes
5answers
3k views

Is there a word for the condition of being infested with ticks? [closed]

Is there a word or term for the state of a human or animal infested with ticks? Mainly just curious. Examples: He's suffering from ______. Don't get near him: he has _____.
12
votes
5answers
14k views

Medical term for deafness

Anosmia = Loss of the sense of smell Anopia = Blindness Anaesthesia/Anaphia = Loss of the sense of touch Ageusia = Loss of taste ? = Deafness I can't find an equivalent medical term for ...
12
votes
4answers
69k views

Medicine vs. Medication

I'm wrote some documentation in which I needed to refer to the list of drugs that a person was taking at a given time. This list might also include a dosage as well (e.g. 'Aspirin 300mg daily'). I ...
11
votes
4answers
3k views

Principles in the use of letters 'b', 'u' and 'v' in Early Modern English typography

I have been reading a medical book by one late surgeon Thomas Gale. I was wondering the following mix-up of letters 'u','v' and 'b'. This states: "to have the cure of". Letter 'u' is used in the ...
11
votes
13answers
177k views

How can I describe someone who feels little or no emotion?

I don't mean someone who lacks emotion because they "don't care", but because either they can't feel emotion or the emotional response is delayed because of a genetic disposition. Maybe there is an ...
8
votes
2answers
10k views

Where does English get the word “condom” from?

Although once a word that dared not speak its name, thanks to popular-culture references as well as the devastating AIDS tragedy, condom seems to be on everyone’s lips these days. But does anybody ...
6
votes
2answers
533 views

Hypernym for “pertaining to (body part)”?

What is a hypernym for the adjectives which describe various body parts or systems? For example: eyes : ocular lungs : pulmonary ears : aural How would I best phrase asking for such words, for ...
5
votes
4answers
217 views

In “The Plague” by Camus, what does the author mean when he talks about ganglia?

In Gilbert's 1948 translation of Camus' La Peste, "The Plague", there are frequent references to "ganglia" as one of the symptoms of the bubonic plague (yersinia pestis). The ...
5
votes
2answers
184 views

Is “sectio caesare” an appropriate English alternative to “caesarian section”?

On Parenting.se we recently received this question, which refers to sectio caesare birth. I was not familiar with the term, but found that wikipedia redirects the term to the caesarian section page. ...
4
votes
5answers
4k views

Blood - Bloods - pluralisation

Why is it that the plural of 'blood' is 'blood' in normal usage but 'bloods' (e.g. 'I'll be taking some bloods') is acceptable in a medical context? Are there any words with similar pluralisation ...
4
votes
4answers
12k views

What is the name of the condition when I temporarily cannot speak because of shouting too much?

What is that condition called in English when I can't say anything, "lose my voice", due to shouting a lot? I think it is related to my vocal chords. The usual treatment prescribed is just to stay ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the name of the disease when a person can see animals or humans that are not present?

I'm looking for answers other than Schizophrenia or Charles Bonnet syndrome. explanatory note: Growing up as a child, I could see certain different cats in my window that would even move ...
4
votes
6answers
2k views

Single word for the process of giving/getting a blood sample

When you receive drugs via a needle you are getting an injection but when a sample of blood is being removed, via a needle, it cannot be an injection as nothing is injected. I am wondering if there ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Word for eating things that aren't food

Is there a word for trying to eat things that aren't food? I'm thinking particularly in the context of babies, where it's a normal part of the learning process, but I dare say it is a disorder that ...
4
votes
2answers
126 views

Is there a term for the combination of a finger bone (phalanx) plus all the soft tissue around that bone?

I originally asked this on the Biology site, but someone pointed me towards this site in their answer for a full-on word request stating this site might be more helpful in that regard. I was ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

Medical term for causing pain to one part of body to relieve chronic pain elsewhere

I seem to remember hearing a medical term for the act of causing pain to one part of your body to relieve a chronic pain elsewhere in the body. For instance, someone who suffers from chronic back pain ...
4
votes
1answer
281 views

Why don't our poor hands get the same Latin-rooted medical care as our feet?

If we want our feet checked, we go to a podiatrist, if we want our hearts checked, we go to a cardiologist. Why, then, if we have a hand problem, do we go to a hand surgeon or a hand doctor and not a ...
4
votes
1answer
384 views

Hyphenating multi-word phrases [duplicate]

I'm trying to figure out whether or not to hyphenate a new medical-related phrase, "post birth control syndrome." I know Post-traumatic Stress Disorder is hyphenated, but that seems to make sense ...
3
votes
8answers
4k views

What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?

It's connected to a scientific paper for a public health topic. I need to name a patient's surrounding of caregivers which can include family members, friends, close relatives. I came up with a ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

Alzheimer disease or Alzheimer's disease? [closed]

What is the proper spelling: Alzheimer or Alzheimer's Disease?
3
votes
4answers
292 views

“Lung/brain cancer/tumours”

When people talk about illness, they tend to say they have lung cancer instead of lung tumours, or brain tumours instead of brain cancer. Why is this?
3
votes
1answer
356 views

Why does medicine term total number of pregnancies carried over the threshold of viability 'parity'?

Gravidity and Parity Definitions (Implications in Risk Assessment) | Patient Gravidity is defined as the number of times that a woman has been pregnant. Parity is defined as the number of times that ...
3
votes
5answers
486 views

What to call a doctor who doesn't really cure their patient with their effort (to get more money from “repeat business”)?

Doctors Are Not “Only Out to Make Money” I read that article and can't get a good word for that kind of doctors, except the term doctors (who) are only out to make money in the second line of the ...
3
votes
5answers
4k views

Best word for health problems

What is the best word for pain and health problems caused by a disease? I want to use it as term for a collection of symptoms, that I gather. For example: [headache, stomachache, nausea] but ...
3
votes
4answers
789 views

What do you call an object inserted between two pieces (of bone)

Imagine someone has a broken bone and after removing any slivers there is a void between the two bone fragments. In order to assure that the bone grows back correctly, a piece is inserted between the ...
3
votes
2answers
415 views

Meaning of the word “cajoling” when applied to dairy cattle?

I am a German scientist and I read the term cajoling in a scientific paper. It is meant to be a sign for oestrus in dairy cattle, but I am not able to find a suitable translation or explanation. So ...
3
votes
4answers
187 views

What to call a medical-care boarding-school for adults

In Russia we have special medical institutions, somewhere between psychiatric hospitals and boarding schools for adults. There are different departments for people with mental disorders and people ...
3
votes
4answers
254 views

(preferably clinical) name for awareness without discomfort

After an orthopedic injury, one often experiences the following trajectory, in order of increasing time since incurring the injury: pain: acute discomfort, often intermittent (e.g., when moving the ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

Sprained ankle vs. twisted ankle

Here are the definitions of the words from Oxford Living Dictionaries: sprain - wrench or twist the ligaments of (an ankle, wrist, or other joint) violently so as to cause pain and swelling but not ...
3
votes
2answers
348 views

What is a medical term for the belief that you're healthy when you're not? [duplicate]

What is a medical term, as in a mental or eating disorder, that means "a compulsion with being healthy, while actually being unhealthy," stemming primarily from a poor understanding of science, ...
2
votes
5answers
14k views

Medical Equivalent of Disbarred

If a doctor loses his license to practice is there an equivalent word to disbarred? For example: That lawyer was disbarred The doctor was (medically disbarred).
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Medical word for finding an unexpected/unrelated condition

What's the word when doctors, whilst treating or investigating one condition, stumble across another? For example patient has a heart attack and during treatment it is discovered he has cancer.
2
votes
3answers
11k views

What do “resolved” and “improved” mean when they are used about recovering from a disease?

Please have a look at the image below. What does the underlined words resolved / resolution improved mean in this image? And, what is the difference between the meanings of "improved" and "reduced"...
2
votes
2answers
712 views

Medicine language: triage and color codes

I found that in many hospitals, in order to classify patients' health conditions, standard expressions like "code red", "code blue" etc. are used. These expressions do not follow the standard "order ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

What do you call a “schizophrenia attack”?

Attack as in panic attack. I don't know the term for it.
2
votes
6answers
5k views

What would be an appropriate word for a medicine that prevents Alzheimer's Disease?

Medicines that people take or give to their children and pets in the hope of preventing infectious diseases are called "vaccines", "immunizations", "inoculations", or "prophylactics". In discussing ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Regular/Routine, Fasting, Blood test/Blood work

I would like to expand my vocabulary with some medical terms in English. I have been thinking about how to say, for example, if I go to see a doctor for a blood test. Q1) Are these phrases correct? ...
2
votes
2answers
35 views

Atrium and ventricle

I was trying to find the original meanings of "atrium" and "ventricle" before they were adopted by heart anatomy. So far I learned that atrium is a word in architecture. But it ...
2
votes
2answers
912 views

Pronunciation of the letter “c” or “ce” in Australian English

In an Australian TV program the disease "encephalitis" was pronounced "enKephalitis." Is there a rule about the pronunciation of the letter "c" in Australian English?
2
votes
2answers
305 views

A word or term to describe a person who feels pleasure in picking on one's skin

What do you call this behavior where gratification is felt when picking on one's or somebody's skin? I have this one friend who feels pleasure in doing such behavior when he is bored or nothing to do ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

When was the word “phobia” coined? [closed]

When was the word phobia coined? And how did the concept of naming different phobias come into existence?
2
votes
3answers
492 views

What do you call a definition in which some (but not necessarily all) criteria must apply?

This is an algorithm for deciding whether a patient suffers from a specific disease or not: A patient has rheumatoid arthritis if at least four out of the following seven symptoms are present: ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

Is there a word for a medical person who only does one proceedure? [closed]

A word for a medical person who specializes in one specific proceedure within a medical specialty?
2
votes
1answer
110 views

What do you call treatments which needs to go on for life for a person and there is no permanent cure for it in medical science [closed]

Something like diabetes, blood pressure, thyroid etc which don't have a cure and medicine has to be taken throughout life.
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Why some blade is called “beaver blade” [closed]

I found the term beaver blade used in veterinary article. Could you please explain why the blade is called beaver blade: is it related to an animal, or something else? How does it related to the ...
2
votes
1answer
224 views

Foods that “insult” the body

How common is the word insult in the sense "[cause] bodily injury/trauma" in modern day English? Is it chiefly medical speak, or has it spread into general print that even the layperson ...
2
votes
0answers
46 views

Medical (anatomy) issue

I’m not a native speaker, but I found a difference in my anatomy book between “is related medially” and “ is located medially” that they have the opposite meaning... Is it true?