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Questions tagged [medical]

Questions about the use of English in medical situations

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1answer
31 views

How do I say that an infection was transmitted to me by droplet contact without sounding weird?

There's a list of ways an infection can be transmitted from one person to another: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmission_(medicine) I can say, "This infection was transmitted to me sexually". ...
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4answers
283 views

What is a single-word adjective for relating /pertaining to physical addictiveness?

I need an adjective which means roughly 'of a tendency to cause physical dependence' that can be applied to drugs. 'Addictive' or the like won't work because it doesn't distinguish between physical ...
12
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5answers
3k views

Is there a word for the condition of being infested with ticks? [closed]

Is there a word or term for the state of a human or animal infested with ticks? Mainly just curious. Examples: He's suffering from ______. Don't get near him: he has _____.
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2answers
63 views

“Can help treat high blood pressure” OR “Can help cure high blood pressure”?

Hawthorn tea can help treat high blood pressure/can help cure high blood pressure. I think "cure" is better. Because most of the time we use cure something, but we use treat someone for something (...
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1answer
50 views

Exclude OR Rule out OR else?

Rachel often gets really bad headaches. She is afraid of having a brain tumor. I know that she does not have other symptoms, which are common in brain tumor so I do not think it is likely that she has ...
4
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1answer
237 views

Why don't our poor hands get the same Latin-rooted medical care as our feet?

If we want our feet checked, we go to a podiatrist, if we want our hearts checked, we go to a cardiologist. Why, then, if we have a hand problem, do we go to a hand surgeon or a hand doctor and not a ...
6
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2answers
389 views

Hypernym for “pertaining to (body part)”?

What is a hypernym for the adjectives which describe various body parts or systems? For example: eyes : ocular lungs : pulmonary ears : aural How would I best phrase asking for such words, for ...
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2answers
82 views

What does it mean if a medical faculty doesn't have “standard medical facilities”?

As English is not my first language, I'm not sure what this means. I've come across a post on a forum saying that some medical schools don't have "standard medical facilities". Here's the whole ...
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1answer
39 views

Why is the word 'resuscitation' preferred over 'revival' or 'resurrection' in medical contexts?

this has been boggling me for a long time now. I never heard of what doctors do in intensive care as 'revival', 'bringing up the dead' or something else. If medical staff of any kind is involved, it ...
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2answers
62 views

are there words exist that are for foreign bodies that [closed]

So are there any words that differentiate foreign bodies in the human body that between neutral, beneficial, and disadvantageous foreign bodies.
3
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1answer
222 views

Hyphenating multi-word phrases [duplicate]

I'm trying to figure out whether or not to hyphenate a new medical-related phrase, "post birth control syndrome." I know Post-traumatic Stress Disorder is hyphenated, but that seems to make sense ...
3
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1answer
3k views

Sprained ankle vs. twisted ankle

Here are the definitions of the words from Oxford Living Dictionaries: sprain - wrench or twist the ligaments of (an ankle, wrist, or other joint) violently so as to cause pain and swelling but ...
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1answer
55 views

Is there a word for a medical person who only does one proceedure? [closed]

A word for a medical person who specializes in one specific proceedure within a medical specialty?
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6answers
5k views

Is “allopathy” pejorative?

Is using the term "allopathy" to describe mainstream (i.e. real) medicine, pejorative? I know the term was originally used by homeopaths to insult real medicine, but I have heard it being used more ...
0
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4answers
76 views

Word for data/information from medical scanner

I need a word for "information from a scanning as it appears in the image used for diagnostics". My context is medical (physics). SPECT and CT are two scanning techniques with different information ...
14
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2answers
3k views

Is there a term for a disease that is spread ONLY from person to person?

I'm looking for a term to describe a disease that is spread ONLY from person to person, not from animal to person (zoonosis): Zoonosis: any disease of animals communicable to humans (Dictionary.com)...
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1answer
2k views

The meaning of the word “hemophilia” [closed]

In medical terminology, words are often combined of Greek and Latin roots and affixes. And we can recognize the meaning of a word by knowing the meaning of the prefix, the root and the suffix. The ...
2
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2answers
656 views

Doing something even though you don't want to on an internal level

It's when you know you're gonna do something that you shouldn't but you do it anyways, like dropping something even though you had no intention of dropping it but the thought of dropping it crossed ...
4
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6answers
1k views

Single word for the process of giving/getting a blood sample

When you receive drugs via a needle you are getting an injection but when a sample of blood is being removed, via a needle, it cannot be an injection as nothing is injected. I am wondering if there ...
0
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1answer
754 views

What's the definition of 'unpatient'?

I'm currently working on neologisms in medical terminology and there is a word 'unpatient' that's been a pain in the neck for me. Here's the original source: New terms giving names to new ...
2
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1answer
101 views

What do you call treatments which needs to go on for life for a person and there is no permanent cure for it in medical science [closed]

Something like diabetes, blood pressure, thyroid etc which don't have a cure and medicine has to be taken throughout life.
2
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2answers
547 views

Medical word for finding an unexpected/unrelated condition

What's the word when doctors, whilst treating or investigating one condition, stumble across another? For example patient has a heart attack and during treatment it is discovered he has cancer.
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2answers
456 views

Condition of having unusually high body temperature due to being exposed to harmful winds? [closed]

What's the word for the condition in which you have a unusually high body temperature after being exposed to harmful winds without proper clothing protection? It's as if the winds somehow got through ...
1
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1answer
105 views

Different uses of “risk of/to/for” in professional medical literature [style]

This question is about the preferred style in medical scientific journals. Consider the following sentences: risk to develop a severe reaction risk of developing a severe reaction risk ...
3
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2answers
303 views

Meaning of the word “cajoling” when applied to dairy cattle?

I am a German scientist and I read the term cajoling in a scientific paper. It is meant to be a sign for oestrus in dairy cattle, but I am not able to find a suitable translation or explanation. So ...
1
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1answer
104 views

What is the name of little people in people (old medicinal belief)

I seem to remember that there was a term for "little people in people", which was a medicinal belief in the Middle Ages (I don't know, okay?), where, before bacteria and other microscopic things were ...
2
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1answer
333 views

Pronunciation of the letter “c” or “ce” in Australian English

In an Australian TV program the disease "encephalitis" was pronounced "enKephalitis." Is there a rule about the pronunciation of the letter "c" in Australian English?
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2answers
859 views

Synonym for AIDS/HIV-positive?

Looking for a single word, an adjective, that means "HIV-positive" or "having AIDS". I am especially looking for slang/informal equivalents, but open to all suggestions. Edit: I am translating a ...
4
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2answers
3k views

Medical term for causing pain to one part of body to relieve chronic pain elsewhere

I seem to remember hearing a medical term for the act of causing pain to one part of your body to relieve a chronic pain elsewhere in the body. For instance, someone who suffers from chronic back pain ...
1
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0answers
67 views

Why is gigantism not called giantism? [duplicate]

Gigantism is a disease of having abnormally large size. Is there a grammatical rule that says that it should be called "gigantism" and not "giantism"?
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2answers
72 views

Is this a proper use of “diagnostician”?

Just a touch of background, this is for a button label in a piece of software. A user presses the button in order to choose the type/specialty of the health care provider that diagnosed them with an ...
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2answers
37 views

If not immunized [closed]

Meningococcal Vaccine Note: If not immunized, participant may sign a waiver declining this vaccination. What exactly does this mean? (english not my first language) Is it saying that I dont need to ...
2
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1answer
188 views

Foods that “insult” the body

How common is the word insult in the sense "[cause] bodily injury/trauma" in modern day English? Is it chiefly medical speak, or has it spread into general print that even the layperson knows what it ...
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2answers
10k views

How to refer to someone who has depression(A noun for someone who has depression)?

What do we call a person who is suffering from depression? Usually I hear "X has depression" but can I say *"X is a 'depressive'"? I have heard the word depressive used as a noun before; but I'm ...
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1answer
842 views

Acronym within an acronym, academic writing

I'm preparing a manuscript for publication in a medical journal about Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). I understand that I have to define the acronym IBD once, when first used in the text (...
3
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4answers
3k views

Alzheimer disease or Alzheimer's disease? [closed]

What is the proper spelling: Alzheimer or Alzheimer's Disease?
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2answers
3k views

What do you call a “schizophrenia attack”?

Attack as in panic attack. I don't know the term for it.
1
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1answer
808 views

“First aid kit” or “medicine box” for home use? [closed]

What term is more widespread and suitable when we speak about box with medicines you keep at home on a regular basis? Every family has such box, where you store necessary medicines, bandages, syringes ...
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4answers
985 views

What do you call the first doctor that a patient meets?

Usually when a person is infected by a disease, they will first visit a nearly hospital or dispensary. In medical terms the first doctor he meets is called something specific. I remember this word ...
0
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1answer
232 views

The meaning of the phrase “to delay the time to occurrence of mood episodes”

I'm not exactly sure what this phrase mean: "the purpose of _ is to delay the time to occurrence of mood episodes ..." My guess is that it means that _ increases the amount of time between episodes.
3
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4answers
165 views

What to call a medical-care boarding-school for adults

In Russia we have special medical institutions, somewhere between psychiatric hospitals and boarding schools for adults. There are different departments for people with mental disorders and people ...
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3answers
153 views

Expression for Yes/No/Unclear(?) in medical score-based diagnosis

This is a repost of a question in CrossValidated which received no attention. https://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/169085/yes-no-unclear-count-score-based-decision-quest-for-terminology In ...
1
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1answer
75 views

Get your phalanges off me

In a movie I heard a character saying "Get your phalanges off me!" Why not "Get your fingers off me"? Is the speaker trying to sound impressive or well-learned? Thank you!
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2answers
212 views

A word or term to describe a person who feels pleasure in picking on one's skin

What do you call this behavior where gratification is felt when picking on one's or somebody's skin? I have this one friend who feels pleasure in doing such behavior when he is bored or nothing to do ...
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3answers
628 views

Single word to describe some tasks performed sequentially

I'm searching for a single word to describe a session made of independent tasks performed sequentially. For example when you go to a medical center (this is the context where it has to be used then ...
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3answers
2k views

What is the name of the disease when a person can see animals or humans that are not present?

I'm looking for answers other than Schizophrenia or Charles Bonnet syndrome. explanatory note: Growing up as a child, I could see certain different cats in my window that would even move ...
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4answers
2k views

Principles in the use of letters 'b', 'u' and 'v' in Early Modern English typography

I have been reading a medical book by one late surgeon Thomas Gale. I was wondering the following mix-up of letters 'u','v' and 'b'. This states: "to have the cure of". Letter 'u' is used in the ...
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2answers
276 views

Mystery word indicating a body part in a medical book published in 1563

The following title is written in a book by surgeon T. Gale published in 1563. I have trouble translating the last word: "Of woundes of the [x]". Mainly the second letter after "B" is blank for me, B?...
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1answer
4k views

Patient vs. subject in clinical research

What is the difference between patients and subjects, in clinical research? I read this paper abstract: The terms “patient” and “subject” are often used interchangeably when proposing, conducting,...
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5answers
429 views

What to call a doctor who doesn't really cure their patient with their effort (to get more money from “repeat business”)?

Doctors Are Not “Only Out to Make Money” I read that article and can't get a good word for that kind of doctors, except the term doctors (who) are only out to make money in the second line of the ...