Questions tagged [medical]

Questions about the use of English in medical situations

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-1
votes
2answers
224 views

Never showing any symptoms

I am looking for the word for someone who never shows any symptoms of a disease. I am not looking for the word asymptomatic. Asymptomatic is often used for people who initially display no symptoms ...
1
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1answer
46 views

How is the word 'gullet' understood by non-medical English speakers?

I've found that there are several dialect words that mean both 'windpipe' and 'gullet'. This is true of Wright's (old, but monumental) dialect dictionary (http://eddonline-proj.uibk.ac.at/edd/) (see ...
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0answers
26 views

Relation of the etymology of «epilepsy» and «cataplexy» to their meaning

I want to know the exact meaning of these 2 words (they are a medical words ... I know their scientific meaning, I need the relation of their etymology to their meaning) the prefix and the suffix of ...
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0answers
28 views

“A low LDL level” vs “low LDL level”

Which is grammatically accurate : "Mrs.Anna has a low LDL level" Or "Mrs.Anna has low LDL level" I want to go with the first sentence.
-1
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1answer
52 views

Someone who carries out medical procedures in a UI

I wanted to know if there is a specific hypernym for the role of someone who performs medical procedures (including, in this case, dental hygienists, dentists and dental nurses) that could be used in ...
0
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1answer
232 views

What is the difference between 'patient' and 'casualty'?

In my experience, the terms 'patient' and 'casualty' tend to be used pretty interchangeably when referring to people in need of medical attention. However, I feel like there's definitely a semantic ...
2
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0answers
43 views

Medical (anatomy) issue

I’m not a native speaker, but I found a difference in my anatomy book between “is related medially” and “ is located medially” that they have the opposite meaning... Is it true?
2
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1answer
96 views

Synonym for “turd” [closed]

Is there a countable noun with the exact same meaning as "turd" - a single, formed piece of faecal matter? Giving the reason for this enquiry might illustrate why 'stool' doesn't really work IMO. (1) ...
4
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2answers
125 views

Is there a term for the combination of a finger bone (phalanx) plus all the soft tissue around that bone?

I originally asked this on the Biology site, but someone pointed me towards this site in their answer for a full-on word request stating this site might be more helpful in that regard. I was ...
0
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0answers
13 views

Do I use an apostrophe if I'm referring to several medical IVs? [duplicate]

First sentence (with apostrophe): The IV's continued to drip as she thrashed on the bed. OR Second sentence (no apostrophe): The IVs continued to drip as she thrashed on the bed. Which one of ...
0
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1answer
49 views

How do I say that an infection was transmitted to me by droplet contact without sounding weird?

There's a list of ways an infection can be transmitted from one person to another: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmission_(medicine) I can say, "This infection was transmitted to me sexually". ...
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4answers
536 views

What is a single-word adjective for relating /pertaining to physical addictiveness?

I need an adjective which means roughly 'of a tendency to cause physical dependence' that can be applied to drugs. 'Addictive' or the like won't work because it doesn't distinguish between physical ...
12
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5answers
3k views

Is there a word for the condition of being infested with ticks? [closed]

Is there a word or term for the state of a human or animal infested with ticks? Mainly just curious. Examples: He's suffering from ______. Don't get near him: he has _____.
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2answers
70 views

“Can help treat high blood pressure” OR “Can help cure high blood pressure”?

Hawthorn tea can help treat high blood pressure/can help cure high blood pressure. I think "cure" is better. Because most of the time we use cure something, but we use treat someone for something (...
1
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1answer
63 views

Exclude OR Rule out OR else?

Rachel often gets really bad headaches. She is afraid of having a brain tumor. I know that she does not have other symptoms, which are common in brain tumor so I do not think it is likely that she has ...
4
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1answer
269 views

Why don't our poor hands get the same Latin-rooted medical care as our feet?

If we want our feet checked, we go to a podiatrist, if we want our hearts checked, we go to a cardiologist. Why, then, if we have a hand problem, do we go to a hand surgeon or a hand doctor and not a ...
6
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2answers
507 views

Hypernym for “pertaining to (body part)”?

What is a hypernym for the adjectives which describe various body parts or systems? For example: eyes : ocular lungs : pulmonary ears : aural How would I best phrase asking for such words, for ...
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2answers
99 views

What does it mean if a medical faculty doesn't have “standard medical facilities”?

As English is not my first language, I'm not sure what this means. I've come across a post on a forum saying that some medical schools don't have "standard medical facilities". Here's the whole ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Why is the word 'resuscitation' preferred over 'revival' or 'resurrection' in medical contexts?

this has been boggling me for a long time now. I never heard of what doctors do in intensive care as 'revival', 'bringing up the dead' or something else. If medical staff of any kind is involved, it ...
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2answers
66 views

are there words exist that are for foreign bodies that [closed]

So are there any words that differentiate foreign bodies in the human body that between neutral, beneficial, and disadvantageous foreign bodies.
3
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1answer
330 views

Hyphenating multi-word phrases [duplicate]

I'm trying to figure out whether or not to hyphenate a new medical-related phrase, "post birth control syndrome." I know Post-traumatic Stress Disorder is hyphenated, but that seems to make sense ...
3
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1answer
4k views

Sprained ankle vs. twisted ankle

Here are the definitions of the words from Oxford Living Dictionaries: sprain - wrench or twist the ligaments of (an ankle, wrist, or other joint) violently so as to cause pain and swelling but ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Is there a word for a medical person who only does one proceedure? [closed]

A word for a medical person who specializes in one specific proceedure within a medical specialty?
28
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6answers
6k views

Is “allopathy” pejorative?

Is using the term "allopathy" to describe mainstream (i.e. real) medicine, pejorative? I know the term was originally used by homeopaths to insult real medicine, but I have heard it being used more ...
0
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4answers
87 views

Word for data/information from medical scanner

I need a word for "information from a scanning as it appears in the image used for diagnostics". My context is medical (physics). SPECT and CT are two scanning techniques with different information ...
14
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2answers
4k views

Is there a term for a disease that is spread ONLY from person to person?

I'm looking for a term to describe a disease that is spread ONLY from person to person, not from animal to person (zoonosis): Zoonosis: any disease of animals communicable to humans (Dictionary.com)...
0
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1answer
3k views

The meaning of the word “hemophilia” [closed]

In medical terminology, words are often combined of Greek and Latin roots and affixes. And we can recognize the meaning of a word by knowing the meaning of the prefix, the root and the suffix. The ...
2
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2answers
753 views

Doing something even though you don't want to on an internal level

It's when you know you're gonna do something that you shouldn't but you do it anyways, like dropping something even though you had no intention of dropping it but the thought of dropping it crossed ...
4
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6answers
2k views

Single word for the process of giving/getting a blood sample

When you receive drugs via a needle you are getting an injection but when a sample of blood is being removed, via a needle, it cannot be an injection as nothing is injected. I am wondering if there ...
0
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1answer
1k views

What's the definition of 'unpatient'?

I'm currently working on neologisms in medical terminology and there is a word 'unpatient' that's been a pain in the neck for me. Here's the original source: New terms giving names to new ...
2
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1answer
108 views

What do you call treatments which needs to go on for life for a person and there is no permanent cure for it in medical science [closed]

Something like diabetes, blood pressure, thyroid etc which don't have a cure and medicine has to be taken throughout life.
2
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3answers
913 views

Medical word for finding an unexpected/unrelated condition

What's the word when doctors, whilst treating or investigating one condition, stumble across another? For example patient has a heart attack and during treatment it is discovered he has cancer.
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2answers
625 views

Condition of having unusually high body temperature due to being exposed to harmful winds? [closed]

What's the word for the condition in which you have a unusually high body temperature after being exposed to harmful winds without proper clothing protection? It's as if the winds somehow got through ...
1
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1answer
131 views

Different uses of “risk of/to/for” in professional medical literature [style]

This question is about the preferred style in medical scientific journals. Consider the following sentences: risk to develop a severe reaction risk of developing a severe reaction risk ...
3
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2answers
382 views

Meaning of the word “cajoling” when applied to dairy cattle?

I am a German scientist and I read the term cajoling in a scientific paper. It is meant to be a sign for oestrus in dairy cattle, but I am not able to find a suitable translation or explanation. So ...
1
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1answer
116 views

What is the name of little people in people (old medicinal belief)

I seem to remember that there was a term for "little people in people", which was a medicinal belief in the Middle Ages (I don't know, okay?), where, before bacteria and other microscopic things were ...
2
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2answers
708 views

Pronunciation of the letter “c” or “ce” in Australian English

In an Australian TV program the disease "encephalitis" was pronounced "enKephalitis." Is there a rule about the pronunciation of the letter "c" in Australian English?
1
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2answers
1k views

Synonym for AIDS/HIV-positive?

Looking for a single word, an adjective, that means "HIV-positive" or "having AIDS". I am especially looking for slang/informal equivalents, but open to all suggestions. Edit: I am translating a ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Medical term for causing pain to one part of body to relieve chronic pain elsewhere

I seem to remember hearing a medical term for the act of causing pain to one part of your body to relieve a chronic pain elsewhere in the body. For instance, someone who suffers from chronic back pain ...
1
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0answers
84 views

Why is gigantism not called giantism? [duplicate]

Gigantism is a disease of having abnormally large size. Is there a grammatical rule that says that it should be called "gigantism" and not "giantism"?
0
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2answers
90 views

Is this a proper use of “diagnostician”?

Just a touch of background, this is for a button label in a piece of software. A user presses the button in order to choose the type/specialty of the health care provider that diagnosed them with an ...
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2answers
39 views

If not immunized [closed]

Meningococcal Vaccine Note: If not immunized, participant may sign a waiver declining this vaccination. What exactly does this mean? (english not my first language) Is it saying that I dont need to ...
2
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1answer
211 views

Foods that “insult” the body

How common is the word insult in the sense "[cause] bodily injury/trauma" in modern day English? Is it chiefly medical speak, or has it spread into general print that even the layperson knows what it ...
0
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2answers
13k views

How to refer to someone who has depression(A noun for someone who has depression)?

What do we call a person who is suffering from depression? Usually I hear "X has depression" but can I say *"X is a 'depressive'"? I have heard the word depressive used as a noun before; but I'm ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Acronym within an acronym, academic writing

I'm preparing a manuscript for publication in a medical journal about Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). I understand that I have to define the acronym IBD once, when first used in the text (...
3
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4answers
3k views

Alzheimer disease or Alzheimer's disease? [closed]

What is the proper spelling: Alzheimer or Alzheimer's Disease?
2
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2answers
3k views

What do you call a “schizophrenia attack”?

Attack as in panic attack. I don't know the term for it.
1
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1answer
963 views

“First aid kit” or “medicine box” for home use? [closed]

What term is more widespread and suitable when we speak about box with medicines you keep at home on a regular basis? Every family has such box, where you store necessary medicines, bandages, syringes ...
0
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5answers
2k views

What do you call the first doctor that a patient meets?

Usually when a person is infected by a disease, they will first visit a nearly hospital or dispensary. In medical terms the first doctor he meets is called something specific. I remember this word ...
0
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1answer
254 views

The meaning of the phrase “to delay the time to occurrence of mood episodes”

I'm not exactly sure what this phrase mean: "the purpose of _ is to delay the time to occurrence of mood episodes ..." My guess is that it means that _ increases the amount of time between episodes.