Questions tagged [meaning]

This tag is for questions related to definitions and nuances of meaning of a word or phrase.

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Please Explain "Twisted With" [closed]

I have come across a description of wires hanging from a gaping hole in a ceiling, and the wires are described as being "twisted with" cobwebs. What would be a proper synonym for something ...
Mduara's user avatar
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Dusty, dusty colors, dusty fur? [closed]

I need help with wrapping my mind around the meaning of dusty when used to describe colors. I already know there's a color named dusty rose, and I just encountered a mention of a kitten being white, &...
Mduara's user avatar
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3 answers
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What does "do windows" mean in this passage?

Yet, despite the rhetoric of “common humanity,” Auster already acknowledges sexual difference: “New York can be dangerous, so you must be careful. If you prefer, smile only at female strangers. (Men ...
Chelsea Qiu's user avatar
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I'm terrified of waking people up, would that be classified as phobia? [closed]

To begin with, I have a traumatic background, therefore I had a lot of bad people in my life. However, I live with just my aunt as well as myself, but she's a heavy sleeper and tends to sleep through ...
Zozo price's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

The meaning of "get away with a light sentence" [closed]

I have a question with the meaning of "get away with a light sentence". Does "get away with a light sentence" mean that "the person escaped a light sentence" or mean that ...
Larry 's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
182 views

Is the usage of the verb "intimate" correct in the following passage?

I've looked up the meanings of the verb intimate on a few dictionaries, but none of the meanings of the verb intimate were adequate to the passage from The Shards by Bret Easton Ellis: Debbie took ...
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What's the definition of direct object and transitive verb? [migrated]

The definition of a direct object is being a recipient of a transitive verb, and the definition of a transitive verb is: characterized by having it containing a direct object. Can someone define the ...
sergbot's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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Merriam-Webster definition of "Sheeps"

Sheep is a noun, and the plural of sheep is "sheep". However I recently came across the Merriam-Webster definition of SHEEPS which states it is "present tense third person singular of ...
Dragonel's user avatar
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Meaning of 'To Marx are due X and Y' [duplicate]

This question is about the emphasized sentence in the following paragraph from Proposed Roads to Freedom by Bertrand Russell: Socialism as a power in Europe may be said to begin with Marx. It is true ...
apadana's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
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Is it possible to say: "He swung at something complicated"?

In my language, this phrase will mean that some person is trying to do some difficult thing, which at this moment is either at the limit of his capabilities or even higher. So, is it possible to say ...
Владимир Говоров's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
56 views

What is the meaning of the phrase "leave everything be" [closed]

Does "leave everything be" mean leave things the same or leave everything as it is and don't interfere?
Dean Davidson's user avatar
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0 answers
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Does "hair curling at the edges" mean the hair has a mild curl pattern?

I might be bad at looking stuff up, and if that's the case I apologize, but I will say to my defense that I have checked for the term and asked AI about it. I'm sorry, I just really need to make sure ...
Mduara's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
185 views

Word request: Sensory words

I'm trying to gather a list of appropriate words that relate in analogous ways for 5 classical senses. Right now I think I've got: Eye/sight:ocular:optic:visual Ear/hearing:otic:aural:auditory Nose/...
Sirskip's user avatar
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1 answer
130 views

Do auxiliary verbs have a meaning / an intrinsic meaning?

Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_auxiliary_verbs): English auxiliary verbs are a small set of English verbs, which include the English modal auxiliary verbs and a few others. Although ...
R.J.'s user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
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Meaning of "booked by this history" in Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities"

The passenger booked by this history, was on the coach-step, getting in; the two other passengers were close behind him, and about to follow. The preceding passage is from Dickens' A Tale of Two ...
anjan 's user avatar
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3 answers
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Pull down to something

In a country song by Blake Shelton "Home sweet home", l came across this construction: Pull down to a cane bridge. I looked up most of the dictionaries, but none of them used the phrasal ...
Mohamed Ali's user avatar
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2 answers
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What's the exact meaning of 'Temprist'?

I look for a word that describes a person who loves music, food, jokes, metaphorically getting high. I mean a person whose MOOD or Temper is usually good and cheerful. And it's better to be a slangy/...
POP POP's user avatar
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2 answers
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Meaning of the expression "beating at an open door"

Please, can anyone help me in explaining the English expression "beating at an open door"? I tried to look on the internet and dictionary to see if I could find an entry that explains it. ...
user497779's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
65 views

Is "I think" unnecessary? [closed]

Is there really any difference between saying "X isn't funny" and saying "I didn't find X funny" or "I think X isn't funny"? To address closing: When I say something isn'...
CrimsonDark's user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
50 views

Is "overnight tonight" redundant?

I use the term "overnight tonight" regularly but also understand how it can be perceived as redundant. For me, "overnight" means passing from one day to another. While "...
Charles Bucket's user avatar
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1 answer
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What did the author mean by "before it became too late" in the following passage?

For context, the character Matt Kellner had been abducted by a serial killer. Matt Kellner did not know he had been targeted for abduction. "What kept weighing me down with fright was that I knew ...
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1 answer
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Can you actually "want a need"? [closed]

I know it's a mouthful, but can you, actually? I ran across this line in my recent reading: For example, in Little Caesar, Rico has power and every material need he could ever want but he has no ...
desmo's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
112 views

Authoritative source for distinction between 'collaboration' vs. 'cooperation'? [duplicate]

The question of how collaborate and cooperate differ (if at all) seems not to have a straightforward answer. It was asked before on this site as What's the difference between "Collaborate" ...
user1362373's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
144 views

Do the commas between these phrases change the meaning?

Do the commas (or lack of) change the meaning between these two sentences: In the beginning, when the house was sold, it didn’t bother me too much. In the beginning when the house was sold, it didn’t ...
AJK432's user avatar
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Difference between the two sentences '... like to swim' and '... like swimming'? [duplicate]

He likes to swim. He likes swimming. What is the nuance hiding behind these two?
vijay hari's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
59 views

Let's assume X+into is a phrasal verb meaning A. X is also used with into again but with a different meaning (B) Can we count it as a phrasal verb?

Let's assume that we have 2 words: X and into. In dictionary the phrase X+into is accepted as a phrasal verb when it means A. We can also use X with the word into again, but then it literally means ...
Melis's user avatar
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0 answers
28 views

Is the word “organization”a synecdoche?

I’m interested in learning the proper term for an entity made up of people—members. Eg an organization is a concept, but is there another word for the whole being more than the sum of its parts?
Marjorie's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
71 views

What do you call a monogram that consists of a single letter?

I am looking for a name for a single letter that is part of a bigger logo, but can also be used stand-alone. Part of my logo uses a standalone "M" (my initial) and I want to use the correct ...
Marijke Luttekes's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
892 views

"Intra": can it be used just like "sub" or does it have extra nuance?

I'm editing a draft academic paper at the moment that distinguishes between the variety that exists between several groups, on one hand, and the varieties that exist within one of those groups, on the ...
James Camien McGuiggan's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
116 views

What's the meaning of "sing'lar"?

And a mighty sing'lar and pretty place it is, as ever I saw in all the days of my life!" said Captain Jorgan, looking up at it. The term is mentioned in the first line of Charles Dickens's A ...
POP POP's user avatar
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What is it called when you mess up or fumble on simple task in front of someone you are attracted to?

For example, most adults can drive well enough it's an unconscious know how to the do's and do nots of the laws of the road. Yet when they have their crush as the passenger they almost crash because ...
Katherine's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
369 views

What was Alexander Selkirk's "flip-can"?

Does anyone know what a "flip-can" is in this particular context? In the Wikipedia article for Alexander Selkirk (one of the sources of inspiration for the Robinson Crusoe story), it says: ...
Anon's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
77 views

When is the phrase "Guest Recognition Expert" from?

I have noticed that some hotels now have jobs for guest recognition experts. Apart from the fact that I find it very hard to understand exactly what it means by just reading its constituent parts, I ...
Simd's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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Doesn't kibbutz also mean to build consensus?

Merriam-Webster only defines kibbutz as a settlement. I'm familiar with a usage that means to meet with a smaller group as part of a consensus building process, similar to Japanese nemawashi Am I ...
David W's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Is there a phrase "a carry-and-top"?

I've encountered a phrase that I can't find out in spite of my attempts to look up in several dictionaries and browsing online. I've tried Ludwig too, but still can't find satisfying answer. It's ...
Hana Nabila's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Can something be a premonition?

Would it be correct to say that something "serves as a premonition" or "is a premonition"? According to Webster's dictionary, a premonition is 1: previous notice or warning : ...
smallpepperz's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
88 views

What is the origin of the phrase "Into thin air"

The meaning of the phrase is well known and can be found in several online dictionaries including Cambridge and Merriam Webster. To disappear without a trace. It appears in Shakespeare's Othello and ...
Peter Jennings's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
86 views

What could expender mean in the following context? [closed]

I recently encountered the following text in a web page specification sheet: Most tables have expenders in each line and There should be new tree named Item that is expended above type of Items ...
dbatno's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
66 views

"Remember of Majesty" - is this title correct?

There is a game, called "Remember of Majesty", but using a verb without any pronoun looks unfamiliar to me. Is this a correct construction? What's the meaning of the title? Is it like "...
Vladislav Rastrusny's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
128 views

What is the difference between 'share to' and 'share with'?

Should I use 'share with' or 'share to' when I want to share a great page I've seen on a social networking site with a friend?
Yue YAN's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

What is the glass circle in a door called? [duplicate]

Some doors have a glass circle near eye level that you can look through to see what's outside. They have a fisheye effect when you look through them, with the image being most accurate in the center ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
92 views

Are there any differences between ‘evolutionary’ and ‘evolutional’? [closed]

I heard the word evolutional quite recently and I’d like to know whether this word has the same meaning as evolutionary has. Do they have different connotations? My gut says that evolutionary is like ...
fresnir's user avatar
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8 votes
5 answers
2k views

In H. P. Lovecraft's work - how is "The Prolonged of Life" understood when it comes to meaning?

I'm translating one of the stories into my mother tongue and I'm struggling with the name of one of the elder gods - "The Prolonged of Life". I do not really understand how this is meant to ...
Petr Ro's user avatar
  • 91
4 votes
2 answers
76 views

Inure: are there degrees of inurement? [duplicate]

Is it correct to write that someone is MORE inured to something? The question is, are there degrees of inure - can you be more, or less inured?
Russell Thomas's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
78 views

Does "breathe in the light" have any colloquial meaning?

I have noticed that the phrase "breathe in the light" is used in several seemingly unrelated pieces of music, for instance, it is the name of a "Stellardrone" track, and in the ...
Daigaku no Baku's user avatar
11 votes
11 answers
4k views

What is the word for the resentful feeling you experience when being accused of something you intentionally avoided doing?

For example, I always put conscious effort into only asking questions that I can't find the answer to for myself and not wasting people's time. In light of this, say I ask person a question, and the ...
Jesse Downing's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

What is the origin of the idiom "get your shorts in a knot"? [duplicate]

I got this idiom from my English homework and still can't wrap my head around why this means "to become over upset over something, especially something unimportant." Does anyone know where ...
Thảo Phạm's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
126 views

Explain: "You never think you're as old as you're ever going to get."

Can somebody explain the meaning behind this comparison? : You never think you're as old as you're ever going to get. I end up here: you're as old = your current age as you're ever going to get = ...
Cornelius's user avatar
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5 votes
0 answers
111 views

Geographic Reasons for Phatic Expression "What's new?"

Quite a while back I had a language instructor tell me that the English phatic expression "What's new?" could be traced back in America to the fact that people lived very far apart from each ...
ChicagoShane's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
130 views

Minus vs less (in math)

We used to talk about subtractions employing the word minus as a preposition like "10 minus 5 is 5... "what is 5 minus 3?" .... Is it OK to replace the word minus by "less" ...
Selfie geoupie's user avatar

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