Questions tagged [mathematics]

This tag is for questions about the usage and meaning of mathematical terminology and the names for mathematical entities in English.

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Contradicting Logic Question

I was asked to write a simple pseudocode based on the scenario below. "The conditions set are; if webcam X and webcam Y are switch on, the input system can enable the recording input and the live ...
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35 views

Early references for 'given' in the sense of 'granted'

Etymonline gives me the following information: given (adj.) [...] From 1560s as "admitted, supposed, allowed as a supposition." [...] It seems to me that this is essentially a dialectical ...
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31 views

Is “till” inclusive or exclusive? [duplicate]

I just want to know whether till is exclusive or inclusive, like if someone says count from 1 till 5, should I say 1,2,3,4,5 or 1,23,4
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82 views

Why is linear interpolation called lerp?

In the field of computer graphics, linear interpolation is called 'lerp'. This is very widely used. I'm curious about why it is called so. I know it is listed in the Jargon file. The file says it is ...
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3answers
99 views

“df.” as an abbreviation

I'm reading a book and I stumbled upon the following paragraph, in context of doing a conceptual analysis, to quote: Ml: Motherhood is the conjunction of femaleness and parent-hood. M2: To be ...
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1answer
26 views

Is it incorrect to omit the “to” after the object after “round” like “Round your answer one decimal place”?

I came across a math homework assignment that said, "Round your answer one decimal place." Interestingly, they decided to not omit the "to" in another phrasing: "Round your ...
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2answers
56 views

“Specialize” as a transitive verb and an antonym for “generalize”

In mathematical writing, I would like to find a transitive verb that means to "apply a general theory to a special case in order to get a theory for this special case". In other words, it ...
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3answers
58 views

A term for a set of which at most one element has to be selected

I'm looking for a term to describe a set of which at most one element can be selected. Example We have the set {0,1,2}. As shown earlier, this is a [insert word here], so we have to select at most one ...
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37 views

cross-condition meaning in medical section text?

I read this article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5362694/ author says "Walraven and colleagues [11] developed the “LACE” index, a cross-conditions tool that predicts early death ...
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2answers
42 views

What are the possible meanings for the word “range” in Math [closed]

On the mathematical website with some problems, there is a statement. "The range of my tiles is a prime number". tiles are just some squares with numbers or a set of numbers. For example, I ...
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1answer
38 views

Why do people say “find the integral” instead of “evaluate the integral”?

"find the integral" contextually implies it is some variable in some equation tucked away and you are isolating for the object somehow, which doesn't make sense for antiderivatives, since ...
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4answers
80 views

“yields” vs “yields that” in math context

I have learned that a commonly mistake in math papers is the phrase by ... we have that ... instead it would be correct to just leave the that. Now I am wondering how to correctly use yield. In ...
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2answers
68 views

What do you call two functions that go together (i.e. as opposites), especially in programming

I'm looking for a word to describe the relationship (or perhaps paradigm) wherein two functions go together and are meant to act as opposites to one-another, or to reverse each-other's behaviour - ...
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3answers
99 views

Mathematically correct expressions for basic operations

There are several similar questions out there, but there is no systematic approach to the problem. So I will try to put all four operations together: c = a + b c = a * b c = a - b c = a / b What are ...
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1answer
16 views

article - absolute value

Is the article before the absolute value? I know that there is always an article in phrases like the absolute value of sth but I saw the sentence below without any article. Is it right? Thank you A ...
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144 views

Should there be a comma before “such that” in this context?

In mathematical papers, one often encounters "such that". I was wondering in what contexts you would need to place a comma before that. An example sentence is the following: Take an element ...
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2answers
71 views

Word meaning one “half” of a dyad

I'm searching for a word that identifies one of the two "halves" of a dyad. The word "half" seems inappropriate because it suggests a whole that has been sundered. I've also considered "element," "...
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1answer
28 views

In reference to the calculation, should one use “mean” or “mean of”?

I am writing a scientific paper and am unsure if I should be using "mean" or "mean of" each time I refer to a calculated mean number. For example, should it be: A) The samples had a mean of 54.1 ...
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45 views

Ambiguous formulation with respect to “minimal”

To my understanding each of the following sentences Let x be a minimal foobar containing baz. Let x be a minimal foobar which contains baz. Let x be a minimal foobar such that x contains baz. can be ...
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1answer
59 views

what is the ed version of times? is it timesed [closed]

i am doing my maths revision and i was wondering how to write down the 'ed' of times. e.g. I timesed it by 5 and it equaled 10.
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25 views

capitalization of the word section, theorem,… if refering using both number and adjective/name

I have a question related to Capital letters in "Theorem", "Conjecture" etc, Capitalization of "Theorem 1" in mathematics papers, https://mathoverflow.net/questions/27693/...
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28 views

Counting numbers

I’ve been noticing more questions on math.SE recently that want to “count the number” of something, e.g. count the number of arrangements of a certain type. My initial reaction to ...
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1answer
60 views

Conjunction after “such that”

I am writing a mathematical paper. Consider a sentence like the following: "we choose a function F such that formula (1) holds and the quantity F(x) is complex" It seems to me that the sentence is a ...
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9answers
2k views

How to say “a<b<c”? [closed]

In the mathematics, a < b I think it should be said as "a is less than b" So, does can I say the title ("a < b < c") as b is larger than a and less than c or is there a better way to say?...
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1answer
85 views

Why is natural logarithm abbreviated to ln? [closed]

In mathematics, the natural logarithm operator is abbreviated as ln. There is no letter n in the word logarithm, so why do we abbreviate in this way?
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1answer
151 views

Assume by/by way of /toward contradiction

What is the correct/best way to start a proof by contradiction? The following three ways are quite common: Assume by contradiction that... Assume, by way of contradiction, that... Assume toward ...
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1answer
178 views

Serial comma in academic papers in mathematics and computer science [duplicate]

Is there a predominant style in academic papers in computer science concerning the usage or the omission of the serial comma? What do ACM and IEEE do in general? I failed to find it out on my own. Is ...
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2answers
432 views

Where does the mathematical use of the word 'root' come from?

Is there any connection between the mathematical and biological meanings of the word root? Where does the mathematical use come from?
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1answer
243 views

What does “assume by contradiction that a<=-2” mean?

I want to prove the following statement. If a+2>0, then a>-2. What does "assume by contradiction that a<=-2" mean?
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2answers
94 views

“infinity more of square roots” and “infinity of square roots”

I have two texts in one mathematical book: And its matrix counterpart I does indeed also have -I and I as square roots (we call a matrix S the square root of A if S^2=S*S=A). But I also has an ...
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1answer
291 views

How to read apostrophe in math [closed]

For example, I have one function called f. Now I make some change to f and create a new function called f'. But how do native people read the "f'"? Like "f apostrophe"?
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1answer
158 views

Are there words like “Percent”, but for other quantities?

If "Percent" is based off of the pseudo-latin "per centum", then it stands to reason that one could use numbers such as ten (decum) or thousand (mīlle) to construct similar words as "perdec" or "...
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1answer
303 views

Saying “into” instead of “times” when talking about multiplication

I'm studying a series on algorithms taught by "Abdul Bari" on youtube Here is when he says "A into B" to talk about multiplying A by B I know why some say "a times b" when talking about ...
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1answer
59 views

Writing equations in line with text

I'm not sure if this belongs on math.stackexchange, but If I were to write: We know a > b, c > d, e > f, and f>g. without the extra space, We know a > b, c > d, e > f, and f > g ...
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1answer
85 views

“by induction hypothesis” or “by THE induction hypothesis”

One of the techniques for proving statements in mathematics is "mathematical induction" (wikipedia entry). Very informally and not precisely speaking, when conducting a proof using this technique, (1) ...
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1answer
34 views

How to write arithmetics inline in a sentence?

I'm trying to wrap my head around the following sentence (this is about maritime and ports): If you are fixing a 10 days port call in a month having a 0.5 ratio would result in (10 x 0.5 = 5 days) ...
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37 views

Term for a value that is not equal to one, but can be a zero or positive value

While we can use the term 'non-zero' to identify a value which is positive or negative but not equal to 0, I need a word or a term to identify a value which can be zero or more, but not equal to ONE. ...
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1answer
139 views

How to describe two numbers are different and has difference of 2?

For example, I want to describe that 2 and 4 has a difference of 2. Is this a correct sentence? What about "2 and 3 is different by 2"?
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98 views

Word for very long and/or very complex mathematical expression?

In some Latinamerican countries (Spanish speaking) the word "chorizo" is sometimes colloqualy used to refer to a very long and/or very complex mathematical expression. This use is almost slang and it ...
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0answers
328 views

Using “respectively” in parenthesis in mathematical writing

In general, I know how to create a correct construction using respectively. But in the specific case when respectively is used together with double parentheses, I'm a bit lost. Which of the following ...
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2answers
137 views

Is there a name for numeric bias?

In the national lottery 6 balls are drawn with numbers 1 to 49 on them. My father could never believe that the numbers 1,2,3,4,5 and 6 had exactly the same odds to come out as any other set of six you ...
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2answers
268 views

Understanding “what fraction of” in a math problem

I am faced with a very problematic wording of a math problem. I can infer what the author meant from the solution, though, I was wandering for the correct linguistic interpretation of the sentence. ...
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1answer
61 views

'Then are equivalent' (followed by a list) in mathematical writing

In mathematical writing, I've often seen people use the expression 'Then are equivalent' to introduce a list of conditions that are logically equivalent to each other (and I've used it myself a few ...
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1answer
251 views

Apostrophe to indicate the plural of a mathematical object [duplicate]

I have a question on the use of apostrophe to indicate the plural of a mathematical object. Consider the sentence: "There are many values of X such that the statement is true". In math, often we re-...
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1answer
43 views

The use of conjunction “and” to avoid repetition

I apologize if my question seems trivial for people who study literature and English language in depth. My question is basically related to the following statements: The existence of X The ...
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3answers
108 views

Is there a better alternative for “remainderless”?

I want to express in one word whether a number has a remainder or not. as an example: 3.5 is not remainderless 3 is remainderless It might seem that something like "3 is whole" or "3 is an integer" ...
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1answer
92 views

French: “triangle rectangle” in English? [closed]

How could I say "triangle rectangle" in English? For non-french people, it's a triangle which has an angle of 90°.
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1answer
101 views

Comma before 'if' in maths definition

I wonder if there is clear guidance about the following construction: We say that a foo admits a bar, if baz is quz. I feel that the comma before if breaks the structure of the sentence, and ...
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1answer
90 views

Function defined on/over/from A to B

how should one read in plain English? In the following sentence, for example: "let f be a function defined on/over/from/(other) A to/(other) B"? edit: This post has been tagged as a possible ...
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1answer
3k views

“There exist” vs “there exists” for universal objects in mathematics

When stating the existence of universal objects in mathematics, one often has to write something like: For every object X there exist an object Y and a map f : Y -> X such that [...] holds. Here, ...

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