Questions tagged [mathematics]

This tag is for questions about the usage and meaning of mathematical terminology and the names for mathematical entities in English.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
2 answers
31 views

Terms for aerial versus ground surface area

Are there accepted area terms that concisely distinguish aerial area (e.g., from a Google Earth satellite photo) from ground surface area? (For sloped ground, the ground surface area is larger than ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
73 views

What is the word to describe a variable whose value does not relate to any absolute unit of measure?

What the title says. I know there's a word but can't remember it. To explain in more detail, I'm trying to state that while the variable is quantitative, the quantity is not referring to an ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
48 views

Articles before names of theorems

there was a similar question but sometimes you cite theorems just by of authors, e.g. you don't say by the Hopkins-Levitzky theorem we conclude but you just say it follows from Hopkins-Levitzky. and ...
user avatar
  • 203
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

How to use commas in these particular situations [closed]

I am a mathematicians, and there are some "sentence structures" that constantly appear in my work. I have some doubt about how "commas" behave in them. I am well aware of the comma ...
user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
3 answers
65 views

What is an antonym for 'one-to-one'?

I am writing a perspective for a general medical science audience. The following adapted figure will be included in the publication: The figure title appearing in the legend includes the following ...
user avatar
  • 3
5 votes
2 answers
205 views

Proper use of articles in mathematical expressions

I am having trouble using articles correctly, especially in mathematical expressions. I made two sentences: Consider the family C of subsets of a set X. Consider a family D of subsets of a set X. It ...
user avatar
  • 161
-1 votes
1 answer
59 views

When defining the median for an odd number of measurements, should we use [(n+1)/2]th or [(n+1)/2]nd?

When defining the median for an odd number of measurements, should we use [(n+1)/2]th or [(n+1)/2]nd? I am aware of a related question but I am nor sure if having the number 2 in the denominator ...
user avatar
  • 265
0 votes
1 answer
76 views

How to read the mathematical expression “xʸ”(or “x^y”) in English, which x and y are any of the complex numbers or algebraic expressions? [duplicate]

For example, x=1, y=2, it is 1², how to read the expression?
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

What is an unambiguous expression for 3 3 3 3 3? [closed]

In some country there is a unit for countable quantity. 3 3 3 3 3 For example, they say "5 count-unit of 3". But in English we just say "five threes". But then 3 3 3 3 3 and 5 3 ...
user avatar
  • 177
2 votes
2 answers
98 views

Is there a term for numbers like 0.5, 9.15, 4.22? [duplicate]

I know that in some country, there is a term for numbers like 0.5, 9.15, 4.22 I mean number with dot(.) in its expression. I sought for the term in English. It was Decimal Number But the term "...
user avatar
  • 177
0 votes
2 answers
62 views

Usage of English articles with mathematical equalities

I was curious about how English articles work with cases such as: For all of the simulations, the B = 15 mT, the f = 10 kHz. The B and f are of course defined earlier in the text and are used in the ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Name for the argument of the mathematical absolute-value function

Some arguments of common mathematical functions have names, like addend, minuend, subtrahend, dividend, divisor, numerator, denominator, and radicand. A colleague recently asked me: does the argument ...
user avatar
  • 387
2 votes
2 answers
66 views

How do you pronounce "over the complexes"?

Is there an agreed-upon way to say "complexes" in the sense of "the set of complex numbers" (as in "solve over the complexes")? Do we keep the stress on the first ...
user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
137 views

Use of "hence" in mathematical English

In math, particularly in plane geometry, there are lots of simple statements that one implies another, and that implies another, and so on. So, "hence" is frequently used. For example, let's ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

“from now” vs “from now on”

In scientific writing, I sometimes introduce variables in the introduction section as follows: The number of gizmos is expoinential in the number of hickeys (for which we write ℎ from now on). […] We ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
137 views

A word to describe sets of something divided into three equal parts as per "quartile" (fourths) or "quintile" (fifths)

I am looking for a word that describes a set of numeric values divided into three equal, ordered parts. For example, "quartile" refers to subsets of a set that has been divided into four ...
user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
1 answer
97 views

Verb for mathematical induction [closed]

The development of mathematics unfortunately chose "induction" as a name for a proof technique -- mathematical induction is not inductive, but a kind of deductive reasoning! I have seen in ...
user avatar
  • 111
-1 votes
1 answer
90 views

Em dash next to displayed equation

I want to use an em dash to set off a parenthetical text for emphasis. However, the text in question is adjacent to a displayed mathematical formula. What is the proper way to do so? I am aware that ...
user avatar
  • 109
0 votes
2 answers
84 views

Squared edge lengths [duplicate]

Can I also say: The energy is based on edge length squared. Adjectives usually go before a noun, but maybe here 'squared' can be treated also as a verb or a postpositive adjective?
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
379 views

"With probability", "with a probability", "with the probability"?

As a mathematician, I often write and read about probabilities. In the literature, I've seen versions of all the sentences below. Which one is correct? This happens with probability (of) 30%. This ...
user avatar
  • 131
9 votes
2 answers
666 views

Confusion about articles before unique objects in math

I am a graduate math student, English is my second language but we have some courses taught in English. I often see sentences like There exists *a* unique map/morphism f such that... (for example, ...
user avatar
  • 203
-2 votes
1 answer
44 views

Must sentences that declare truth be declarative syntatically? [closed]

I'm reading a book about discrete math written by Kenneth H.Rose and in it he states that in mathematical logic, A proposition is a declarative sentence (that is, a sentence that declares a fact) ...
user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
84 views

Why does standard usage of "percentile" vary from other _iles (quartiles, deciles, etc.)?

In my experience, the standard usage of "percentile" is as given by OED (September 2018): Each of the 99 intermediate values of a variate which divide a frequency distribution into 100 ...
user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
114 views

Sequential/continuous/continued/parallel addition [closed]

I would like to know what's the standard way to say sequential/continuous/continued/parallel multiplication or addition for calculation like 3 * 5 * 10 * 2 * 11 and 1 + 5 + 3 + 2 + 4 + 100. PS: Glad ...
user avatar
  • 777
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Relative pronoun "in which" vs. relative adverb "where" II

I am confused by why the following sentence is connected with "in which". The term "applied mathematics" also describes the professional specialty in which mathematicians work on ...
user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
125 views

Is counter example a valid form of counterexample?

In student writing about math, I see the term "counter example" instead of "counterexample" too often. Does anyone have good ideas about why people think "counterexample" ...
user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
3 answers
167 views

How to indicate that a function is exponential?

This may be a very specific question and honestly I am still unsure whether I should be asking this here or in the Math Exchange. Maybe it is something very specific to mathematics, I don't know. So ...
user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
1 answer
370 views

What is " x– direction " and " y-direction "? [closed]

It is related with mathematics and cartesian plane.I want to know what " x-direction " and " y-direction " is .it will be better if you explain it with an example.
user avatar
  • 17
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Word for a guess that turned out to be correct? (Ex-conjecture)

In mathematics we have a problem. Unproven guesses are often referred to as "conjectures" - for example, the Poincaré conjecture, or the Tait conjectures. (Notable exceptions: the Riemann ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
119 views

What is the process of finding the remainder in division called?

Is there any one word for the process of calculating the remainder (division)?
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
34 views

Set of functions whose

I am confused while writing a mathematical definition. Do we say A set of functions whose derivative is equal to 1, or A set of functions whose derivatives are equal to 1? I would prefer the first ...
user avatar
  • 614
-1 votes
1 answer
201 views

Is "equals to," as in "one plus one equals to two," ungrammatical? [closed]

I study mathematics alongside many Chinese students. They will often use the phrase "equals to," as in "one plus one equals to two." Is this usage incorrect?
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
128 views

Use of "whenever" or "when" instead of "if" in logical sentences

The conjunction "if" is used a lot in scientific writing. I wonder if it is correct to replace it with "when" and/or "whenever". For example, instead of writing: (1) a · ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

Matrix A of shape (5, 9) or with shape(5, 9)?

When a matrix has a shape (5, 9), is it of shape(5, 9) or with shape(5,9)? As the shape is an attribute of the matrix, I suppose it is with? Or something else e.g. having? Which one is appropriate? a ...
user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
1 answer
22 views

Term to describe how much something has changed from its original configuration

Is there a term that describes how far removed or how many change steps are between two given states or configurations? Complexity is a term to describe that something is intricate or complicated, but ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
27 views

Term for the unit of grouping large numbers?

I asked this on mathoverflow but I guess it's not so appropriate there so... In English and probably most (if not all) western languages, we group numbers by powers of 1000. So we have: ones, tens, ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Capitalize new construction introduced in mathematical proof

Let's say that I am trying to prove a mathematical theorem. As part of that proof, I may want to introduce a construction that I will use repeatedly throughout the proof (and potentially combine many ...
user avatar
  • 103
-1 votes
1 answer
101 views

How are these mathematical expressions read? [closed]

Hi, can you please help me with reading of these expressions? The first one could be: sum of n plus one above the sum of k plus one? The second: five above two equals five factorial divided by the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

how to describe a set of strings with various types of format [closed]

In my scientific experiment, the measurement of equipment may appear as follows 1’’-2’’, 3”:4”, [1”, 2”], or (1”:2”), etc. I would like to describe this fact in an article. What is the best way to ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
121 views

Is "till" inclusive or exclusive? [duplicate]

I just want to know whether till is exclusive or inclusive, like if someone says count from 1 till 5, should I say 1,2,3,4,5 or 1,23,4
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
338 views

Why is linear interpolation called lerp?

In the field of computer graphics, linear interpolation is called 'lerp'. This is very widely used. I'm curious about why it is called so. I know it is listed in the Jargon file. The file says it is ...
user avatar
  • 129
1 vote
3 answers
304 views

"df." as an abbreviation

I'm reading a book and I stumbled upon the following paragraph, in context of doing a conceptual analysis, to quote: Ml: Motherhood is the conjunction of femaleness and parent-hood. M2: To be ...
user avatar
  • 129
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Is it incorrect to omit the "to" after the object after "round" like "Round your answer one decimal place"?

I came across a math homework assignment that said, "Round your answer one decimal place." Interestingly, they decided to not omit the "to" in another phrasing: "Round your ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
78 views

"Specialize" as a transitive verb and an antonym for "generalize"

In mathematical writing, I would like to find a transitive verb that means to "apply a general theory to a special case in order to get a theory for this special case". In other words, it ...
user avatar
  • 101
2 votes
4 answers
138 views

A term for a set of which at most one element has to be selected

I'm looking for a term to describe a set of which at most one element can be selected. Example We have the set {0,1,2}. As shown earlier, this is a [insert word here], so we have to select at most ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
150 views

cross-condition meaning in medical section text?

I read this article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5362694/ author says "Walraven and colleagues [11] developed the “LACE” index, a cross-conditions tool that predicts early death ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
76 views

What are the possible meanings for the word "range" in Math [closed]

On the mathematical website with some problems, there is a statement. "The range of my tiles is a prime number". tiles are just some squares with numbers or a set of numbers. For example, I ...
user avatar
  • 453
-2 votes
1 answer
46 views

Why do people say "find the integral" instead of "evaluate the integral"?

"find the integral" contextually implies it is some variable in some equation tucked away and you are isolating for the object somehow, which doesn't make sense for antiderivatives, since ...
user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
641 views

"yields" vs "yields that" in math context

I have learned that a commonly mistake in math papers is the phrase by ... we have that ... instead it would be correct to just leave the that. Now I am wondering how to correctly use yield. In ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
198 views

What do you call two functions that go together (i.e. as opposites), especially in programming

I'm looking for a word to describe the relationship (or perhaps paradigm) wherein two functions go together and are meant to act as opposites to one-another, or to reverse each-other's behaviour - ...
user avatar
  • 696

1
2 3 4 5
10