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Questions tagged [literature]

Questions citing excerpts from works of literature.

7 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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What's the origin of the phrase “fatal dower”?

I recently ran across the phrase "Constantine's fatal dower," which sounded like a quotation, so I googled it. The specific reference to Constantine that started my quest comes from Canto XIX of ...
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As for you, Frodo, in so far as lies in me

It's from The Lord of the Rings: ‘Then I will declare my doom,’ said Faramir. ‘As for you, Frodo, in so far as lies in me under higher authority, I declare you free in the realm of Gondor to ...
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Is “fare you well” still used in Norfolk?

Jean Rhys's story "Till September Petronella" contains the following passage: 'Fare you well,' he said. 'That's what they say in Norfolk, where I come from.' 'Good-bye.' 'No, say fare you ...
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Words that are spoken one way but written another

I was recently involved in answering this question: Renumeration vs Remuneration (reimbursed financially), which is correct? Which asks whether "renumeration" or "remuneration" is correct in terms ...
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Is there a literary device to show how a character or interactions with a character changes as the story goes on?

I'm trying to break down Wilfred Owen's Disabled, and I feel like there should be a device for describing his condition before and after the war. Girls treat him so differently. He used to be a ...
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What did Jane Austen mean by “employ for captivation”?

I read the phrase employ for captivation in Jane Austen’s 1813 Regency novel, Pride and Prejudice: “Undoubtedly,” replied Darcy, to whom this remark was chiefly addressed, “there is a meanness in ...
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Which word can replace “provision” in this excerpt from Pride and Prejudice?

The sentence is: "Without thinking highly either of men or of matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only honourable provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and ...