Questions tagged [journalism]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Media writing: beginning sentences with coordinating conjunctions

I understand that in many contexts it is appropriate to begin a sentence with a coordinating conjunction, and I am aware that variations of this question have been asked here many times. Mine, however,...
4
votes
3answers
95 views

The proper name for a “story with photos”?

What is the proper English word that means a publication (e.g. in a paper or online) consisting of a series of photographs along with short author’s comments? Here is a live example of such ...
13
votes
2answers
449 views

Origins of the 'editorial we' and its counterpart, the 'editorial I'

In researching an unrelated EL&U answer, I came across this commentary in an item titled "Hobart Town" in the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (November 10, 1829): These three ...
2
votes
1answer
121 views

Origin of the interjection “shock horror”!

I am familiar with the phrase Shock Horror! which is usually used ironically to announce something that is not, in fact, at all surprising. I believe it derives from the style of tabloid newspaper ...
2
votes
0answers
213 views

The origin of the current use of 'readout' in reporting political news

The word ‘readout’ has recently started appearing in various U.S. news reports in a sense that seems to be relatively new: a public summary of a meeting, or a phone conversation, which was not itself ...
15
votes
2answers
545 views

Wolff ’s sweetening the beat

In an interview on Late Night with Seth Meyers, the CNN journalist, Jake Tapper, said the following about the author of Fire and Fury Jake Tapper: Oh, yeah! I mean, I, I think Michael Wolff very ...
33
votes
7answers
9k views

Is there a word for a question asked despite knowing the answer, but meant to elicit a response for the sake of the audience?

In journalistic writing I often see writers, correspondents, and interviewers use questions in non-literal ways. Of course there are rhetorical questions designed to make a point and not meant to ...
1
vote
1answer
316 views

Strange Omission of “to be” in The Onion Headlines

So I've noticed a pattern lately on the TheOnion.com of omitting 'is' from their headlines. I get shortening headlines but I can't say this pattern is familiar to me. It strikes me as obtuse and ...
2
votes
2answers
63 views

Are there any style guides that dictate the use of “on/at Amazon” (and other web platforms). If so, what are they and what's the reasoning behind it?

I've been doing some really basic copywriting for various books that I've seen on various reading lists and I occasionally refer readers to Amazon. Here's a simple example: You can get a good ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Conventions of abbreviations of pages (pp.), for academic/journal purposes

I am asking about the conventions of abbreviations of pages, for academic/journal purposes. For example, if one submits a paper on arXiv, you will see that some renown physicist/mathematician uses the ...
2
votes
1answer
209 views

What effect is the writer trying to create with the use of “bigly?”

This is from the same paragraph that sparked my question about pratfall a few minutes ago. What is the origin of "pratfall?" The full paragraph is here (highlighting is mine): But the ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

What is the origin of “pratfall?”

I came across the word "pratfall" in this journalistic piece: eHuffington Post: Donald, you are not in Manhattan anymore But the first pratfall ― cancelling the vote on the bill after insisting it ...
4
votes
2answers
153 views

Term a 'sheet something' to prove you are a published journalist/writer?

Sometime back, I read somewhere that if you want to cover an event, the event organizer may ask to see a 'sheet something'. I don't remember what this terminology or the phrase is. The phrase ...
2
votes
3answers
994 views

Journalistic term for front-page promotional strip [duplicate]

The Financial Times, like many other newspapers, has a strip under its title on the front page, split into several items (three in today’s paper — see illustration) promoting articles on internal ...
-1
votes
1answer
186 views

What does DLRS Mean as the 4th Most Common Word in ~10,000 News Articles?

I just conducted a frequency distribution of ~10,000 news articles and removing punctuation and stop words (common words like "the", "a", "an", etc.) I Found that the top word after "said", "man", and ...
6
votes
3answers
162 views

Is there a word that describes when an editor sends some copy back to be altered?

In a publishing context, if a writer submits some copy (eg. an article) to an editor and the editor sends it back to be amended in some way, is there a word to describe that? Not 'reject' but ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

The meaning of “did not immediately respond to requests for comment” [closed]

This expression is included in many news stories but to me, it's frustratingly vague. I see these as "weasel words" - some journalist leaves a voice mail for someone, waits 10 seconds for a callback ...