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Questions tagged [is-it-a-word]

Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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1
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1answer
470 views

Permittee and Permitter? [closed]

According to Wiktionary, permittee is the one who receives a permit. May I call the one who permit something as permitter?
8
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1answer
57k views

Is “pidgeon” a correct alternate spelling of “pigeon”? [closed]

Is "pidgeon" a correct spelling for the grayish fowl scientifically known as Columba livia domestica? Pigeon appears to be the more common spelling, but it looks strange to me. For comparison, words ...
12
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3answers
122k views

Is “pronunciate” a word?

Is "pronunciate" a word? At first it doesn't seem to be, but why not? "Pronunciation" and "pronunciative" seem to be words, so it would seem natural that "pronunciate" would be. After Googling, I ...
5
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2answers
2k views

Is the word, “kinda-sorta” accepted as a normal word to be used in writing?

I was drawn to the word, “kinda, sorta” which appeared in the article of Time magazine (April 27) under the headline, “The Clippers Should Have Boycotted Game After Owner’s Racist Remarks”: The ...
0
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1answer
2k views

Does “it'll've” exist? [duplicate]

From what I can glean, it'll and I've exist as standard contractions, but I am unsure of whether it'll've either exists or is acceptable. "It will have" should be able to be reduced to "it'll've", ...
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2answers
1k views

Ataraxis or/and ataraxia, a quandary. A question over their existence and usage?

The Oxford dictionary has ataraxia (ataraxy) as a valid word but not ataraxis. however, I've seen and heard the ataraxis being used once in while. But it happens that the guys at Oxford do not ...
1
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4answers
5k views

“corollarily” or equivalent?

A corollary in mathematics is a useful side-effect (with other related meanings, but as it pertains to this question, that's the relevant definition to keep in mind). I want to use the word ...
3
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3answers
15k views

Is 'biasedness' a real word?

I am curious about the usage of word biasedness, I am unable to find it in Oxford's advance learners dictionary but on the internet. When tried to consult some expert, he said that it's a colloquial ...
0
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1answer
3k views

Is reusal an English word? [closed]

Is the word "reusal" part of the English language? For example, given this sentence: ROS tries to facilitate the operation, development and code reuse of robot systems by organizing the parts of ...
11
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5answers
35k views

What's the antonym of “prioritize”? [closed]

If someone is asked to do something important, they might say "I'll prioritize that". But if someone is asked to put something aside to work on something else more important, what could they say? In ...
-1
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1answer
3k views

Is “narcotraffic” a real word?

I know the meaning but does this word actually exist in English? Should I use it in a formal paper?
0
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1answer
7k views

Is “annoyedly” a word? [closed]

I want to say: "Michael annoyedly turned to face his brother." I haven't found any solid evidence that the word "annoyedly" is an actual word, but I like the way it sounds for some reason. How wrong ...
33
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5answers
18k views

Is “legit” a legitimate word?

Is legit an actual word, or is it a slang word that has been shortened from legitimate?
0
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1answer
5k views

“Umbrella” as a verb? [duplicate]

One of the meanings of umbrella is a term for other things. So, is it possible (yet) to use umbrella as a verb? To umbrella something? Perhaps an umbrella'd issue? I saw someone used "umbrellered" ...
0
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2answers
8k views

Is “orientate” a word? Does it matter where you are when using it? [duplicate]

Is orientate a word and if so how is it different than orient? I found this definition of it says "Generally considered an error in American English." does this mean it is not wrong for British ...
-1
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1answer
1k views

Adverbial form for a common swear word

Is shittly a word (and if so, how many t’s does it have?) or do I have to use shittily?
1
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4answers
34k views

Has anyone here ever used the word “professionality”? (Or is it even a word?) [closed]

I've heard the owner of our school say the word twice. Urban Dictionary even has a definition for it: Professionality: The art of maintaining a professional appearance and attitude while projecting a ...
-2
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1answer
3k views

Does the word “googling” exist? [closed]

I wonder if the usage of googling is proper in the following sentence. I've done a bit of googling and review walkthroughs about this product X available in the market. I have seen this word ...
5
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2answers
2k views

Is subaccount one word?

I looked at the Cambridge and Oxford dictionaries online and they don't contain this word. But typing it into google takes me to the Merriam Webster definition. So does this just come down to taste? ...
2
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2answers
4k views

Is 'acronymise/ze' a word? Is it used only colloquially, if at all?

I just sent a text to a friend, who didn't understand an acronym I used for a game: "Ah, I said it in a previous text so thought it was ok to abbreviate it." Though, since it was an acronym I ...
3
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2answers
9k views

Is “kekeke” considered an English word?

"kekeke" is somewhat of an alternative to "hehehe" or "huehuehue". From Urban Dictionary: This is an onomatopoeia for laughter. Its origin is the Korean onomatopoeia ㅋㅋㅋ, in which ㅋ stands for the "...
0
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1answer
3k views

Is “grammered” a word?

Can I get any details about the word grammered? Is there any relation between it and "grammatically corrected" or "grilled and hammered"?
5
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5answers
5k views

Is “yearslong” a word?

The New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
1
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2answers
33k views

Can you say “unconfident”, as in the opposite of being/having confidence? [closed]

Can you say unconfident? I heard it mentioned in Top Chef recently, where a chef mentioned she was unconfident with her cooking skills in a certain area. Is this the correct way to describe the ...
11
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5answers
43k views

Minimize vs Minimalize

First, is minimalize a word? If so, what is the difference between the two words minimalize and minimize, and when should each be used?
9
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5answers
115k views

Is funner a word? [duplicate]

I am constantly told "funner" is not a word. Even Google auto corrects. Yet "funner" is used very often in spoken English with people I meet. Is funner a word? If not why? What causes it to not be ...
4
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6answers
10k views

Is there a word “issual”?

I have used and come across the phrase "issual of tickets" but when recently writing something my Word dictionary tells me that "issual" is not an actual word. Is that the case?
3
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1answer
584 views

Using pond as a verb to describe the formation of puddles

"The tenant complained that water is ponding in the parking area." or, "Due to the ponding of water in the lower lying areas, mosquitoes became a nuisance." "ponding" is not accepted by spellcheckers ...
0
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1answer
898 views

Is “ignorably” a word?

I would like to use ignorably as the adverb of ignorable but I am not sure whether this is correct. I did not find ignorably in any online dictionary. To give the context: Normally, you cannot ignore ...
2
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2answers
3k views

Can “conversant” be a noun?

Googling amongst the world's online dictionaries produces conflicting results, but on the whole indicates that the answer is "no". However, it feels so natural to say: The conversants conversed. ...
1
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1answer
375 views

Can I use “linkography” instead of “bibliography” when referring to web links?

I’m writing a piece of documentation and I want to add the links I'm referring to at the bottom of my document. Since they are links and not books, I think the section title should not use the word ...
4
votes
2answers
403 views

“Prolers” is in no English dictionary and yet it's in several online Scrabble dictionaries. Is it an English word?

Is the word prolers an English word or just rubbish/noise added to the Scrabble dictionary? If it's a real English word, what does it mean? (Not a general reference question by virtue of this word ...
1
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2answers
105 views

Could 'otwards' or even 'hotwards' ever be accepted into the language?

I've just woken early from a vivid dream. (must be the local ale - we are in Yorkshire at the moment). I was in an inferno of an industrial kitchen where they were manufacturing 'ready-meals'. One ...
3
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4answers
5k views

Is “inbuilt” a word? Is it alright to use it or should I use “built in”?

I searched and found this: “Built-in” or “In-built”, which says inbuilt is fine. But in a reddit comment, I was told that I should use built in instead of inbuilt. Which is correct? I am using the ...
4
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3answers
30k views

Is “disclude” a word and what authority says a word is a word or isn't?

So far this is what I found from Wiktionary and Merriam-Webster except the latter doesn't have disclude. Exclude — To keep something out. From Latin excludere, from ex-, “out”, + variant form of the ...
0
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2answers
16k views

Is “hayway” an English word? [closed]

I thought I had heard and seen this word being used. For example, If you do this, things will go hayway. Meaning that things will go out of order in a mess/berserk, something like that. Now I ...
0
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4answers
390 views

Is 'handshaking' a legitimate word? [closed]

In microprocessors, handshake signals are issued by a microprocessor in acknowledgement of a request by another device. This process has been repeatedly referred to as 'handshaking' in my lectures. ...
3
votes
1answer
269 views

Is 'somelike' a word?

Never mind the laconic title. It's incontrovertibly a word. What I'd like to know is whether the little bugger has ever been recorded by lexicographers. I've ruffled a dozen dictionaries to no avail, ...
1
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2answers
4k views

Are we using “Aswaddumization” word? [closed]

"Aswaddumization" is a derived word from Sinhalese language(Sri Lankan native language ) and gone to English (as I heard), the meaning of "Aswaddumization" is cultivation of land. However, I cannot ...
5
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3answers
2k views

Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word?

Usage: "I would not like to eat that pie as it looks all festy since you dropped it on the ground." Is the colloquial Australian term 'festy' actually a word? Also, is it used elsewhere in the world?
1
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2answers
6k views

Is “revelationary” a word in the English language? [closed]

Is "revelationary" a word in the English language?. If it isn't a word in proper English, then which word, if any, can be used for something that leads to a revelation?
1
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3answers
4k views

Is “restructuralization” a word?

I found this word restructuralization on a project report and was wondering whether this word exists in the English language.
5
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3answers
518 views

Is “demonstratee” a legitimate word?

Is demonstratee a legitimate word? None of the usual sources think so, but it seems like -ee should be a productive suffix. If it isn't, is there another word that can be used in reference to the ...
1
vote
1answer
805 views

?thesaurical, adj

The adjectival form of thesaurus does not seem to have been listed on (all) standard dictionaries. However, thesaurical occurs in literature1 and is also defined in Urban Dictionary. Do we have an ...
45
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7answers
449k views

Are “w/o”, “w/”, “b/c” common abbreviations in the US?

I remember when staying a few months in the US years ago that I saw some people using the abbreviations below. However, I can't exactly remember in which contexts I encountered them, (whether I saw my ...
5
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1answer
2k views

Is “teh” an English word?

I remember being told that "teh" (a common misspelling of "the") is actually a proper (though very old and no longer in common usage) English word. Teh was used as an example that if every single ...
5
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3answers
8k views

Is “Plannable” an English (UK) word?

Is plannable, (e.g.: this task can be planned, it is plannable) an actual word in UK English? It's one I see used quite often (mostly in business scenarios, both spoken and in emails) but haven't ...
1
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2answers
962 views

Is “mainstream” an acceptable verb?

I recently read the word "mainstream" as a verb and doubted whether it was the best choice in the sentence. Can you say you want to "mainstream" something? Perhaps it is grammatical but just ...
13
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3answers
48k views

Speeded vs. Sped [closed]

I think "speeded" may have been the appropriate past-tense form for "to speed" in the past, but I wonder if it is still considered the correct form. In spoken English, one usually hears "sped" to ...
4
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1answer
8k views

Does the word “simpleness” actually exist? [closed]

I always thought the word "simpleness" didn't exist and this was even confirmed by some American friends of mine. However, I tried to look it up on some online dictionaries and I was surprised to find ...