Questions tagged [is-it-a-word]

Questions about the perceived legitimacy of would-be words.

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11
votes
2answers
3k views

What does “adorkable” mean? How popular is this word? To what kind of objects and occasions can I apply “adorkable”?

I happened to find the paperback book titled Adorkable, by Sarra Manning, on the GoodReads site. There is no entry for adorkable in the Cambridge, Oxford or Merriam-Webster dictionaries, or in ...
8
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3answers
6k views

Why isn’t “hermeticity” easily found in the dictionaries?

The word hermeticity as (for the lack of better definition, hence the question) “the quality of being hermetic” (not to be confused with mathematical hermiticity, which is also absent from the general ...
2
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2answers
4k views

Is “contentual” a proper word?

Is contentual a proper word? I saw in Wiktionary that it is considered to be a proper word: contentual adjective Relating to content (as apposed to context) However, I have not seen it cited in any ...
14
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5answers
20k views

Is “embiggen” considered a formal or slang word?

If my memory serves me correctly, I first encountered the word embiggen a year or so ago. I thought it seemed odd, but in context, the meaning was quite obvious. Since that time I've seen this word ...
12
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3answers
37k views

Is “laser-focused” a new word?

I found the word “laser-focused on the bottom line” in the following sentence of the New York Times (August 6) op ed titled, “Dream, Baby, Dream!” “We also know – look at Syria – dictators who have ...
11
votes
7answers
78k views

Is “baddest” a proper word?

I just came across this documentary: The World's Biggest & Baddest Bugs by Animal Planet Is "baddest" a proper word? Shouldn't it be "worst"? What is going on here?
8
votes
4answers
4k views

Isn’t “Eye-glazing” a popular word? Why isn’t it included in major English dictionaries?

I came across the word eye-glazing in the article of today’s Time magazine (Sept 9) titled ‘Slow Down! Why Some Languages Sound So Fast?’, which I'm sure will interest 'language buffs'. It begins ...
5
votes
3answers
544 views

Is “demonstratee” a legitimate word?

Is demonstratee a legitimate word? None of the usual sources think so, but it seems like -ee should be a productive suffix. If it isn't, is there another word that can be used in reference to the ...
4
votes
3answers
35k views

Is “disclude” a word and what authority says a word is a word or isn't?

So far this is what I found from Wiktionary and Merriam-Webster except the latter doesn't have disclude. Exclude — To keep something out. From Latin excludere, from ex-, “out”, + variant form of the ...
3
votes
3answers
12k views

Is “irritance” not a word?

I thought the word irritance was a word — but it isn’t one according to Google and my dictionary. It sounds correct; what is the word I should use? By irritance I mean something that’s being ...
2
votes
4answers
6k views

Is “inbuilt” a word? Is it alright to use it or should I use “built in”?

I searched and found this: “Built-in” or “In-built”, which says inbuilt is fine. But in a reddit comment, I was told that I should use built in instead of inbuilt. Which is correct? I am using the ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Is “rewirings” a word?

Is "rewirings" a word? I recently found myself at need for its use and every location I search says it's spelled incorrectly / doesn't exist, yet I'm fairly certain this would be the correct word to ...
1
vote
2answers
7k views

Is “revelationary” a word in the English language? [closed]

Is "revelationary" a word in the English language?. If it isn't a word in proper English, then which word, if any, can be used for something that leads to a revelation?
0
votes
1answer
328 views

Is ‘affinative’ a word?

The Microsoft .NET Framework API¹ has a curiously named interface ILogicalThreadAffinative. According to their naming standard, namely concatenating capitalized meaningful English words into a single ...
12
votes
5answers
28k views

Is the word “representativity” possible?

I found natural to use the word "representativity" (with regard to a sample population of a survey), but my dictionary does not agree with me. Is "representativity" a valid construction?
9
votes
7answers
28k views

Can “rentee” be used to refer to one who rents an item?

I am working on a project where I need to be able to distinguish between one who is offering something for rent, and one who is renting from someone. The phrases used need to be short and concise. ...
8
votes
1answer
101k views

Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How obsolete is the word “overmorrow”? Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? Perhaps a term that has fallen out of modern English usage. ...
7
votes
1answer
8k views

Is “submittable” a valid word?

Is "submittable" a valid word to describe something that is eligible to submit?
6
votes
4answers
8k views

Is 'uniquer' a word?

My spellcheck doesn't complain about 'uniquer'. Is it a valid word? Since unique means "one of a kind", 'uniquer' has no valid definition, but that doesn't prevent it from being a valid dictionary ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Is ‘Bash-a-thon’ a received English phrase or just a combination of words?

I saw the word ‘Bash-a-thon’ in the headline of the Time magazine article (August 3) - ‘Palin Joins in Romney Bash-a-thon’ followed by the lead coy: “In an interview with Hannity, Palin takes Romney ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Is subaccount one word?

I looked at the Cambridge and Oxford dictionaries online and they don't contain this word. But typing it into google takes me to the Merriam Webster definition. So does this just come down to taste? ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

Are all officially recognized Scrabble words English?

Looking at the official complete two-letter Scrabble word list, I cannot help but wonder whether they are even based on real English words. Are they? Note: I realize the answer to this question may ...
4
votes
4answers
11k views

Is “uncollaborative” a word?

I am describing a process as being antithetical to collaboration. To clarify, I'm referring to its quality as being "not naturally collaborative", not "actively anti-collaboration" Is "...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Is ‘Yes-ish’ a perfect alternative to Yes, or is it 'Yes ‘on condition’? Is it received English?

I found a word ‘Yes-ish’ in the answer (from PLL) to my question about the meaning of ‘Stuck to the script’ I posted today. As it is quite new to my ear, I consulted with Wikipedia before logging out ...
4
votes
3answers
805 views

Is “Prewin” a well-received English word?

I find Maureen Dowd’s article in November 24 NY-Times titled “But can they eat 50 eggs?”amusing. She compares the leadership and charm of character between President Obama and Robert Griffin III, the ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

Is 'quiescing' a valid word? What does it mean?

What does quiescing mean in the following context? Quiescing a Database http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14231/start.htm
2
votes
4answers
13k views

Is 'disabilitated' a real word?

I think not, but look at this Wikipedia link about parental leave in different countries, scroll down to the large table and look under Romania. I don't think this is a real word, I tried doing an ...
2
votes
1answer
403 views

Local : Global :: Localite :?

Context: I want to indicate people who keep travelling around the world (sometimes as part of their jobs and sometimes to volunteer during a crisis) without settling down at a single country. I came ...
2
votes
2answers
771 views

Is there a common abbreviation for “with or without”? e.g. _w/wo_ or _w/w/o_

Is there a common abbreviation for "with or without"? e.g. w/wo or w/w/o Obviously, something this complex is best written in full form, but I'm looking for something to use in space ...
2
votes
2answers
16k views

Opposite of subpar… superpar?

If something can be "on par", and "subpar", can something be described as "superpar"? Is there an accepted way to describe something as extraordinary with this term?
2
votes
1answer
72 views

Word for being aware only of oneself [duplicate]

I'm looking for a word that describes an entity having only knowledge of its own existence, but no one else's. The closest I have now is autognostic, auto being "self" and gnostic being "having ...
1
vote
1answer
411 views

Can I use “linkography” instead of “bibliography” when referring to web links?

I’m writing a piece of documentation and I want to add the links I'm referring to at the bottom of my document. Since they are links and not books, I think the section title should not use the word ...
1
vote
3answers
17k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
1
vote
2answers
314 views

Could “mismodify” be a word?

I've never seen it in any dictionary, and searching on Google gives fairly few, almost irrelevant results, but it seems like it could potentially be a word, albeit perhaps a technical one at that. It ...
1
vote
1answer
271 views

Term for organization being sponsored — “sponsee”? [duplicate]

I have seen a few sponsorship agreements and in one of them the term "sponsee" was used to define the organization being sponsored. The context was a company who sponsors a local team. The agreement ...
0
votes
1answer
6k views

“Umbrella” as a verb? [duplicate]

One of the meanings of umbrella is a term for other things. So, is it possible (yet) to use umbrella as a verb? To umbrella something? Perhaps an umbrella'd issue? I saw someone used "umbrellered" ...
0
votes
3answers
514 views

Word that describes a 'noun that can be used as an example'?

In my native language, there is a word that is usually said to exceptional people. It is an adjective that means, for example, that you are so great, you could be made an example for others. To make ...
0
votes
2answers
12k views

Is “orientate” a word? Does it matter where you are when using it? [duplicate]

Is orientate a word and if so how is it different than orient? I found this definition of it says "Generally considered an error in American English." does this mean it is not wrong for British ...
-1
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3answers
1k views

ORIENTEE, a word or not in Scrabble?

I am confused why I cannot use 'ORIENTEE' as a word in Scrabble. It should mean 'someone who is attending orientation, as in a new employee (and the word is formed analogously: 'someone being ...

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