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votes
1answer
1k views

Is recepted a word?

I have been saying this for years, I think. I also thought I had heard it used before. However, today I used it in a sentence, and my spell checker under lined it. The sentence(fragment) I wrote was: ...
1
vote
3answers
169 views

Usage of the word “interimly” [closed]

I have a quick question: I used the word interimly talking to someone today. It went something like - 'I give you (someone) pat on the back for interimely filling someone's else shoes'. I am strongly ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Working Culture vs Work Culture

I've seen both usages in articles published by reputable media like NYT and the Entrepreneurs. I've seen both being used to refer to what seems to me to be the same thing. It's so puzzling to me. An ...
3
votes
1answer
127 views

What is wrong with the word “motorsporting”?

I was reading a book where the author is discussing the BBC buying the rights to show Formula 1. He quotes the press release by the BBC announcing the acquisition. The book's quote is "the biggest ...
6
votes
1answer
462 views

Meaning/Origin of word “Nixie”

In the area of which I live, there is a certain word we use to describe somebody that is naughty, or bad, in a joking/lighthearted manner. I do not know how to spell the word, and every attempt to ...
0
votes
2answers
549 views

Why dispute Efficate as a word [duplicate]

Not a "formal" word, but most of our current day mobile texting is not formal, a whole new evolving language... I use "Efficate" as: "... What can I do to best efficate Laura's desired outcome?"
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Why is “seldomly” not a word? [closed]

It feels like "seldomly" could be a very useful word. For instance, I often get the urge to say "It is seldomly discussed that the world is a messed up place". "seldomly" here would mean something ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a word to describe a feeling of devotion or love to or being a fanatic to a country that is not my own?

Patriotism is the word that describes a love or devotion to a person's own country. I'm looking for a similar word except one that describes this same feeling when it is not your own country you’re ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

“Predication” — the logicians' usage

There are several distinct ways to differentiate men and women — chromosomal analysis, self identification, and visual inspection — we review each predication below… Here predication is referring to ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Is “rewirings” a word?

Is "rewirings" a word? I recently found myself at need for its use and every location I search says it's spelled incorrectly / doesn't exist, yet I'm fairly certain this would be the correct word to ...
3
votes
2answers
975 views

Is there a valid English word for “playability”?

I edit a lot of writing on the topic of cue sports, like pool and billiards. The word "playability" comes up a lot. For example, if one is trying to explain that a pool cue is excellent in feel and ...
6
votes
3answers
9k views

Is there a word “dramaticness”?

I want to write the following: This is due to the dramaticness of the day. What other word can I use?
4
votes
7answers
8k views

What word means both “advantages and disadvantages”?

So I am writing an essay and I can't find the word I want to use. The sentence says: When I travelled to England there were pros and cons. The sentence doesn't sound right and if I change it to: ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Can I use the word “grabbable”?

I intend to describe something possible to be held by hand. I want to use the word in this fragment: Flat 3-dimensions and grabbable 2-dimensions. I'm trying to express in my paper that the ...
4
votes
3answers
514 views

bemustached versus mustached

I’ve just read an article in The Huffington Post in which the phrase “bemustached 26-year-old” was used: Sex and sword swallowing beg some pretty obvious comparisons, but the similarities aren’t ...
2
votes
2answers
716 views

Could `impliant` be a proper word, meaning opposite of `pliant`?

We have the word impliable meaning the opposite of pliable, but there is no dictionary opposite of pliant. (Shorter OED, Apple Dictionary on Mac, dictionary.reference.com, www.merriam‑webster....
7
votes
1answer
10k views

Is there such a word as staticness?

I want to use the word staticness but can't find it on a dictionary. I've seen it though been used in my google search.
1
vote
1answer
9k views

Is 'efficate' a word in English? [closed]

I routinely hear the word "efficate" being used. For example, "The most powerful way to efficate a change in the system is to participate." I do not find entries for this word in common English ...
-1
votes
3answers
9k views

What is the meaning of unhighlight [closed]

What does the word "unhighlight" mean? Alternately, is it even a word? What would be its usage? I can't find it in my dictionary or on the internet. I am using it in the context of if you highlight ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

“handy” instead of “mobile phone” (non-Germans) [duplicate]

Does anybody (non-German) ever use the word handy instead of mobile-phone in English?
12
votes
3answers
120k views

Is “pronunciate” a word?

Is "pronunciate" a word? At first it doesn't seem to be, but why not? "Pronunciation" and "pronunciative" seem to be words, so it would seem natural that "pronunciate" would be. After Googling, I ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Ataraxis or/and ataraxia, a quandary. A question over their existence and usage?

The Oxford dictionary has ataraxia (ataraxy) as a valid word but not ataraxis. however, I've seen and heard the ataraxis being used once in while. But it happens that the guys at Oxford do not ...
3
votes
3answers
15k views

Is 'biasedness' a real word?

I am curious about the usage of word biasedness, I am unable to find it in Oxford's advance learners dictionary but on the internet. When tried to consult some expert, he said that it's a colloquial ...
-1
votes
1answer
3k views

Is “narcotraffic” a real word?

I know the meaning but does this word actually exist in English? Should I use it in a formal paper?
0
votes
2answers
8k views

Is “orientate” a word? Does it matter where you are when using it? [duplicate]

Is orientate a word and if so how is it different than orient? I found this definition of it says "Generally considered an error in American English." does this mean it is not wrong for British ...
-2
votes
1answer
3k views

Does the word “googling” exist? [closed]

I wonder if the usage of googling is proper in the following sentence. I've done a bit of googling and review walkthroughs about this product X available in the market. I have seen this word ...
5
votes
5answers
5k views

Is “yearslong” a word?

The New York Times just published an article where they use the word "yearslong": Federal agents charged 18 current and former members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on Monday, ...
1
vote
2answers
33k views

Can you say “unconfident”, as in the opposite of being/having confidence? [closed]

Can you say unconfident? I heard it mentioned in Top Chef recently, where a chef mentioned she was unconfident with her cooking skills in a certain area. Is this the correct way to describe the ...
4
votes
6answers
10k views

Is there a word “issual”?

I have used and come across the phrase "issual of tickets" but when recently writing something my Word dictionary tells me that "issual" is not an actual word. Is that the case?
3
votes
1answer
577 views

Using pond as a verb to describe the formation of puddles

"The tenant complained that water is ponding in the parking area." or, "Due to the ponding of water in the lower lying areas, mosquitoes became a nuisance." "ponding" is not accepted by spellcheckers ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Are we using “Aswaddumization” word? [closed]

"Aswaddumization" is a derived word from Sinhalese language(Sri Lankan native language ) and gone to English (as I heard), the meaning of "Aswaddumization" is cultivation of land. However, I cannot ...
3
votes
2answers
8k views

Is “workflow” a word? [closed]

I'm trying to reference a business process in which a document has to be approved by several different people before it is finalized. I want to be able to say things like: We've modified the ...
-1
votes
2answers
4k views

Is “unmissable” a valid word?

I noticed an advert on TV advertising "unmissable" shows coming up. MS Word marks it as a spelling mistake, but the Mac OS is OK with it. I don't particularly like it.
-2
votes
1answer
261 views

Is 'promptus' a valid word? [closed]

I did a Google:define on Promptus and think it has Latin origin. But since I don't see it in the English dictionaries, I am not sure if I can use it at all in my conversation.
6
votes
2answers
6k views

Is “outstaffing” a real word?

In Russia a lot of companies provide "outstaffing" services , but I am not sure whether it's used outside post USSR countries. Is "outstaffing" a real word? Update: "Outstaffing" is when one company "...
11
votes
2answers
3k views

What does “adorkable” mean? How popular is this word? To what kind of objects and occasions can I apply “adorkable”?

I happened to find the paperback book titled Adorkable, by Sarra Manning, on the GoodReads site. There is no entry for adorkable in the Cambridge, Oxford or Merriam-Webster dictionaries, or in ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “scopperloit” a real word?

Bysshe, Bysshe, Bysshe! What are we going to do about you? I hope you'll pardon this mesonoxian and inaniloquent lamprophony from a nihilarian pronk; it is not so much a phenakist scopperloit as ...
7
votes
7answers
1k views

Is the word “throwee” acceptable?

I wanted to have a word to refer to the thing being thrown, so I decided to use the word "throwee". I can't find this word in online dictionaries, so I guess this word does not exist in the English ...
6
votes
1answer
436 views

Is “postchoice” a well-used word?

I came upon the word postchoice in the following sentence of Time magazine’s (May 28) article titled “The optimism bias,” dealing with the benefits of positive thinking: According to social ...
3
votes
2answers
15k views

Opposite of subpar… superpar?

If something can be "on par", and "subpar", can something be described as "superpar"? Is there an accepted way to describe something as extraordinary with this term?
3
votes
3answers
721 views

Is “prepper” a word that an average English speaking person understands?

Is prepper a word that an average English speaking person understands (and also uses)?
11
votes
3answers
10k views

Is there a verb “refactor” meaning “doing refactoring” in English?

Code refactoring consists of changing the structure of the code without changing its functionality. The term refactoring is currently used by software development industry to refer to this process. ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is the word “encomprise” used in modern English? [closed]

If one googles the word encomprises, there are 5K+ pages, that have this word. I personally have heard people in the USA use it with a meaning of include. Official dictionaries, on the other hand, ...
19
votes
2answers
12k views

If I can say “videos”, may I also say “audios”?

Audio and video seem to me very similar words by usage. I often hear the plural form for video, but is there a plural form for audio? Can I say audios? I've never heard it being used.
179
votes
13answers
128k views

What is wrong with the word “performant”?

I keep getting the red underlining in Word whenever I write the word "performant". Here I intend to refer to something that performs well or better than something else (i.e., it's more performant). ...
35
votes
9answers
210k views

Is “receival” a valid word for the act of receiving something?

In the course of reviewing a standard operating procedure, I came across the subheading: "Receival, Costing and Charging of Work". I immediately began to doubt whether the word "receival" was a ...
22
votes
4answers
66k views

Using “seldomly”

I'm not a native English speaker. If at all possible I try to use spell checkers while writing anything on the web hence using one in Firefox as well. Whenever I try to write "seldomly" it highlights ...
17
votes
6answers
28k views

Is “kinda” a word?

I've used "kinda" as a word basically meaning "kind of" just run together. I wouldn't use it formally, but I noticed that Microsoft Word's spellchecker says that it isn't a word. I searched some and ...