Questions tagged [irregular-verbs]

Irregular verbs are verbs whose basic forms are not of the regular type as open/opened/opened.

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If the past participle of “say” is “said”, and “lay” is “laid”, why the one of “stay” is not “staid”?

I know about the word "staid". Does the past participle of "stay" is "stayed" to avoid confusion with this word? Or the "staid" past participle existed at some time, but it was supplanted by "stayed",...
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2answers
209 views

Why is “builded” an archaic variant of built, given that usually the language evolves the other way?

In one of the Nature articles related to Google n-grams site [1], as well as in the book [2], the authors describe (and quantify the rate of) the process of regularization of English irregular verbs. ...
11
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3answers
4k views

The ambiguity of: “resent your message” [closed]

I am not a native English speaker. Thus I am not sure about the meaning of an email I received. Since the writer is important to me and I depend on his good will, I am afraid to ask him what he wanted ...
2
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1answer
6k views

Is someone “casted” or “cast” in a film role? [duplicate]

Can the word 'casted' be used in this headline? Michael Fassbender Casted In Upcoming "Kung Fury" movie
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2answers
840 views

Is a software loop “breaked” or “broken”?

In software development there are code loop constructions, which you can BREAK. foreach(i in integers) ... break If I break the cycle, it becomes broken or breaked? Which sentence is correct ...
2
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1answer
265 views

Using participial adjectives [closed]

Is this grammar just for regular verbs? Or we can use irregular verbs, too.
8
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2answers
784 views

Why does the past tense form of sleep have a weak suffix?

Meaning: to sleep is a strong verb in the Germanic languages. While I'm quite aware that strong vs weak anything has very little bearing on modern English, this is still something that puzzles me. ...
12
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4answers
1k views

Irregular verbs in English - why do so many end in D?

This might just be availability bias on my part, but it seems to me that if a verb ends is a "d" sound then it's a lot more likely to have an irregular past tense than an average verb picked out at ...
3
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1answer
50 views

Coherence on regular vs irregular verb spelling [closed]

I have been confused by this for quite some time. I have always used learnt as past forms of the verb learn. However, I have always used the regular spelling of the other verbs which follow the same ...
2
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3answers
5k views

Glided, Glid or Glode [closed]

Dictionaries say that the past tense of glide is glided. ‘a few gondolas glided past’ But in my dialect, I say glode and sometimes glid and most people I know also do but apparently glided is ...
8
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2answers
15k views

Does anyone really say “SAYS” rather than “SEZ”?

I've just heard Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn, at 10:13 here (about a quarter of the way through Prime Minister's Questions, UK Parliament, Thurs 27 Oct) saying... Amnesty International SAYS, ...
2
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0answers
241 views

Which form to use when a verb has an irregular and an regular form? [closed]

This list of verbs given at English for students.com shows that some verbs, as to blend (blent/blended), to broadcast (broadcast/broadcasted), to bide (bode/bided),... have irregular and regular past ...
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1answer
1k views

The sun has shined/shone its shine? [duplicate]

I'm working on some lyrics here, and I'm not sure what would be correct/best: After the sun has shined its shine After the sun has shone its shine Google returns more results for the latter, ...
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2answers
11k views

A second past-form: “dig” / “digged” / “digged”

I've been digging through the Internet and I can't find any legit answers to this question, even in English dictionaries. Probably because this particular usage is rarely used in the past tense. ...
0
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2answers
381 views

the use of seeks and sought

I will like to know the various uses of seek and its past participle sought. for instance, is it right to say; It is advisable the secretary seeks clearance from her boss before issuing permit. OR ...
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4answers
45k views

How common is pronouncing the past tense of beat as /bet/?

Personally, I pronounce the past tense of "beat" (to win at a game) as /biːt/, to sound identical to the infinitive. However, I have heard a few people under the age of 30 and from either the west or ...