Questions tagged [irregular-plurals]

For questions about words which have an irregular plural form.

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29 views

The Miss(es) Joneses

Fowler reads The Misses Jones is the old-fashioned plural, occasionally used when formality is required, e.g. in printed lists of guests present, etc.; otherwise the type the Miss Joneses is now ...
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71 views

In Scottish English are all plurals after an “s” sound pronounced as “-seez”?

In English I'm accustomed to the incorrect irregular plural pronunciation used by many educated speakers for the words "processes" and "biases" to end in /siːz/ instead of /səz/ ...
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1answer
34 views

Extremely fast shipping time

Which sentence is grammatically correct: "We can provide extremely fast shipping times" "We can provide extremely fast shipping time" I was arguing the first was correct because ...
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34 views

Analogue to appending “s” to the end of an acronym when plural does not have an “s” [duplicate]

Some acronyms can be naturally pluralized. For example, consider the acronym RTP which stands for regional tax policy -- the plural is regional tax policies and thus the acronym can be written as RTPs....
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31 views

If one presidential term is four years, how do you say two terms in terms of years? Two four years's?

If one presidential term is four years, how do you say two terms in terms of years? Two four years's? Two four years doesn't make a lot of sense but two four years's sounds weird.
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2answers
71 views

How to suggest plurality of a generic word?

There is a basket of oranges kept in the middle of the room. A child comes in and kicks it. I want to describe the action but want to use the generic "fruit(s)" in the sentence. It does not ...
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1answer
195 views

Plural of “beef Wellington”

A colleague asked: what is the plural of "beef Wellington"? (In response to a few comments, I recognise that I am unlikely to be misunderstood in a restaurant no matter how I order ...
1
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1answer
48 views

One troop full of troops? [closed]

A troop is a group of soldiers but when they say 32,000 troops they mean 32,000 soldiers, not 32,000 groups of soldiers. But one soldier is never referred to as one troop. What's up with that?
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1answer
51 views

few/little/some software (in plural) [duplicate]

I would like to say: Available calculation methods are limited to few software. With "few", I mean 3 programs. However, "software" is an uncountable noun. "Some" and &...
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1answer
24 views

Objectives for Plural Subjects

Please have a look at the following example. The shops on the high street see a customer drop. The shops on the high street see customer drops. Which one is grammatically correct? Thanks.
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27 views

Why is the plural of array “arrays” and not “arraies”? [duplicate]

I was always taught that a plural of a word ending in y was slept ies instead of ys. So for example: City => Cities Country => Countries Bakery => Bakeries but with Array the plural is ...
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1answer
134 views

Why did “species” take over the singular?

As far as I know, it is very rare to have a noun in English that is both singular and plural and ends with "s". But "species" is such a noun, and I was surprised to learn that it ...
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14 views

Pluralization of “XX Second Delay”

There is an app that I recently used that had music playback functionality. Among other things, one of the features it provided was that I was able to adjust the speed of the lyrics using two buttons. ...
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4answers
808 views

English plural of “conundrum”

A Physics.SE question had me reading up on D-branes on Wikipedia, where I found the following sentence in the section on black holes: The concept of black hole entropy poses some interesting conundra....
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1answer
41 views

How to add a possessive to a plural that doesn't follow the “add s” rule?

Let us say that I want to talk about the houses that are collectively owned by a set of mice. The phrase "the mice houses" doesn't make sense to me, but "the mice's houses" also ...
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16 views

Plural or singular subject-verb agreement [duplicate]

My question is in regards to the sentence below: Take advantage of free editing tools like Grammarly, which helps pinpoint small typos, or Hemmingway App, which shows you how to increase readability. ...
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1answer
56 views

Can I use shoes as a collective noun as singular?

The only thing I can wear is my shoes. Can I use shoes as a collective noun in singular, as in the example?
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1answer
1k views

Why isn't “giraves” the plural of “giraffe” like “wolves” is for “wolf”? [duplicate]

The plural of giraffe, according to Merriam Webster and some other dictionaries I checked, is "giraffes". Normally when the final sound of an English word is F, its plural ends in V sound. ...
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2answers
166 views

Can the word “fruit” be used as an invariant plural as in “the fruit are” and “two fruit”? [duplicate]

Background: Over here on this forum for English speakers learning Chinese, there is debate on which ones among the following are correct English: the fruit is the fruits are the fruit are *? Other ...
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1answer
75 views

Why is “learnings” considered acceptable? [closed]

In 2020, within Australia, the term "learnings" has become very in-vogue within the media and political set. But why is the noun learnings considered acceptable English, at all? 'Learnings ...
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19 views

The military uses robots? Or the military use robots?

Some comments: I use robots. You use robots. The people use robots. Everybody uses robots. The school uses robots, but schools use robots. So perhaps the military uses robots. I saw a previous thread ...
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2answers
70 views

Is there a term for a compound word such as Sergeant Major, which plural form doesn't modify the last word?

Born out of a lighthearted comment I made earlier today, stating that the plural form of Mini Cooper would be Minis Cooper, I've been curious if there is a specific name for this type of plural. My ...
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2answers
184 views

English nouns whose plural form differs from singular

The singular of people is person. For example, if there are three people in a room, you would refer to one of them as a person. There other English nouns of this type, e.g. cattle vs cow/bull. Is ...
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71 views

“Series” – a noun of multitude similar to “lot”, “majority”, “percentage”, “proportion”– verb agreement

According to Garner's fourth edition Though serving as a plural when the need arises, series is ordinarily a singular noun. But it is also a noun of multitude, so that phrases such as a series of ...
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2answers
14k views

Is it “men's” or “mens'”? And what's the rule? [duplicate]

Why is it that men's eyes always drift toward females? I mean, "men" is the plural form of "man". So it's "mens'"... but it looks very strange, and maybe this only ...
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2answers
66 views

Six foot tall, a herd of elephant: special use of the singular in certain syntactic contexts

CambridgeGEL, page 1588 reads Examples like She’s six foot tall involve a special use of the singular form rather than a base plural: the difference between this and How many feet are there in a mile?...
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2answers
153 views

Why is seraphim a plural of seraph? [closed]

This pluralization pattern is highly unlike those I found in English, such as those ending in -(e)s and ones that were technically borrowed from Latin and Greek, thus following different patterns that ...
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4answers
4k views

Why is stigmata a plural of stigma?

When I first looked this word up on Dictionary.com, I found entries not for it, but instead stigma. I was baffled. Words in the English language usually follow the -(e)s pluralization pattern, but why ...
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1answer
494 views

What is the proper written plural possessive form for nouns that do not take -s, -es, or -ses upon pluralisation?

For most English words, the rules for construction of possessive forms are fairly simple. Singular nouns are possessivised by adding -’s to the end (even if the word already ends with an S):1 cat → ...
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1answer
103 views

What is the plural of Easter Bunny? [closed]

Is the plural for the Easter Bunny "Easter Bunnies"? Or because it's a proper name, is it "Easter Bunnys," much like the plural you see written on the welcome mat for a family whose last name is "...
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14 views

which one is more appropriate among the two mentioned below?

Roles of private defence firms in developing a domestic military-industrial complex or Role of private defence firms in developing a domestic military-industrial complex
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2answers
149 views

Can French/British be used as plural nouns?

Neither British nor French can be used as a singular noun. For example, (a) is ungrammatical. a. *A French/British is dancing. Although the French/British can mean 'French/British people' ...
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52 views

New words with Apophonic plurals

I was wondering if new words or neologisms have been formed with apophonic plurals such as; foot->feet mouse->mice goose->geese I am not searching for nouns that were influenced by the i-mutation ...
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1answer
32 views

Is the word 'result' as a singular noun grammatically correct? [closed]

Take ownership of your tasks, see them to completion, and then take pride in the result.
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1answer
41 views

Is the usage of plural correct in this sentence? [closed]

Articulate an idea or a concept so that your content preempts questions
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545 views

How do I refer to multiple people with the same name

My daughter now has her own bedroom. She doesn't want her sister to come in. She has made a sign. "No Paiges Allowed!" What is the correct apostrophy use on "Paiges" when I want to refer to ...
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1answer
73 views

Can the word 'child' be pluralised : 'childs two, three and four'? [duplicate]

The question "Can 'childs' ever be the plural of 'child' in standard English ?" produced answers which agreed that it could not. However, I notice today that, in Court, children, who had been named ...
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142 views

the plural of the name of the letter e is ees [duplicate]

According to the wikipedia article of letter e The plural of the name of the letter e is ees (the plural of the letter itself is rendered E's, Es, e's, es). Therefore, is ees then a regular ...
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1answer
179 views

Is this sentence correct? It seems wrong, but I can’t pinpoint why!

I am proofing work for someone and this sentence seems incorrect, but I'm not sure why I think that. Is it truly incorrect? I feel like 'comes' should be 'come'. He stumbles back downstairs to the ...
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673 views

What is the plural of “remittance advice”?

The most common plural of “remittance advice” — a note sent by a customer paying a supplier, indicating that payment is on its way — seems to be “remittance advices”. However, I find that to be ...
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2answers
422 views

How to pronounce plural of “corps”

According to all dictionaries I've seen the plural spelling of "corps" remains "corps". I guess the plural of "corps" is pronounced the same as the singular, meaning: (Military) a military ...
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2answers
130 views

Words whose plural has a plural

I'm working on an app that works with inflections and realized "person" has three levels of plurality: person -> people -> peoples Are there any other words in English that act this way?
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155 views

What is the plural of “+1”? [duplicate]

What is the best plural of "+1" in casual American English writing? Possible ideas I've considered include: +1s +1's
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22 views

“Two sum problem” - why not “sums”? [duplicate]

Why in the name "Two sum problem" there is "sum" and not "sums"?
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2answers
296 views

Is housewares a double plural?

Of all the words ending in 'ware', housewares is the only one that gets an ending 's'. cookware earthenware flatware glassware hardware shareware silverware software stoneware tableware tupperware ...
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1answer
393 views

Of sweet tooths and black sheep: when does the plural of a compound turn regular?

According to many dictionaries, the plural of sweet tooth is sweet tooths, and not *sweet teeth (see e.g. here and here; the OED doesn't address the issue explicitly, but one of the examples it ...
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1answer
66 views

What would be the correct term for a single instance of a multiverse?

I am trying to write (some fiction) about how the (singular) universe got shattered into a multiverse (collective noun?) I tripped up when I wanted to refer to one of the instances (or branches if ...
3
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1answer
429 views

What is the plural of platinum?

In the card game Dominion, I always thought that the “Platinum” card, in the plural form, would be “Platinums”. However, Dominion Online lists the plural form as “Platina”. Is this correct, or is ...
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2answers
231 views

The pural opi for opus is a joke, right?

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/opus attests that some people in the classical music world use "opi" as a plural for "opus." I think this is just a joke, giving a pseudo-learned false-Latin form for ...
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1answer
73 views

Countable noun with irregular plural form [duplicate]

How can I express a countable noun together with its irregular plural form? For example, we may have the following sentence: Find all critical point(s) of this function. Since we do not know if ...