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Questions tagged [inversion]

Questions about reversing the order of a clause’s subject and verb, including subject–auxiliary inversion in questions and normal subject–verb swap in locative, directive, copular, and quotative inversions.

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2answers
69 views

Which “not” is not in the proper place: “Not only does (not) she (not) know, but also …” [closed]

I know that whenever we bring "not only" at the beginning of a sentence, what comes after it has to be in question form. Now, I'm having a problem with the negative form of this question. Which one ...
0
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0answers
13 views

place of “also” in “Not only …, but also … .”

Good day! Construction: "Not only ..., but also ..." By which rule can we place "also"? "Also" is before a subject: (1): Not only was it later, but also it was raining. (2): Not only would I not ...
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2answers
1k views

How does the “reverse syntax” in Middle English work?

I was reading the Romance of Tristan and I came across the passage: "Therefore did Tristan claim justice and the right of battle and therefore was he careful to fail in nothing of the homage he owed ...
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1answer
29 views

Interchanging “if” and “then”

AFAIK, normally one would write: "If c is zero and b nonzero or b2=4 a c, then and only then there exists a unique solution of 0=a+bx+cx2." Is it possible to interchange the if and the ...
10
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1answer
690 views

When “be it” is at the beginning of a sentence, what kind of structure do you call it?

I think it is kind of inversion and I'd found some info on Wikipedia, but I cannot recall what term this structure is, I even remember some examples from Wiki, say, "be it ever so humble, there's no ...
1
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1answer
65 views

If only had I known it! / If only I had known it!

Could you help me, please? A question for the native speakers (desired) of British English or American English. Which variant is correct and why? Or it's possible to use either of them)? If only ...
0
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1answer
18 views

Should “is…” be always considered as question sentence?

Should this always be considered as a question? or there is exception? In figure A: is the frame bigger then in the figure B.
2
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0answers
23 views

Inversion with adverbials: when do I need the auxiliary?

I'd like to know why some inversions need an auxiliary and others don't need one. For example: "Little did I know about her" auxiliary + subject + verb Why not "Little knew I about her", which is ...
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0answers
11 views

Grammatical error in a sentence [duplicate]

Which one is the correct sentence? I want to know where my weakness is I want to know where is my weakness
1
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1answer
22 views

Unsure if my inverse order compound sentence makes is correct

I am working on a college essay and I have one sentence that may have a grammar issue. I was successful in my goals for the program, but even more so was the program successful in its goals for ...
1
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2answers
117 views

Subject in “Over there is where I'll be.”

Here's a conversation between a receptionist of a hotel and a man wanting to meet a girl living in the hotel: Man: Is she in? Receptionist: Just missed her, actually, but you're welcome to ...
1
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1answer
52 views

Is there an inversion in the clause? [closed]

The noise was like an English fox-hunt only better because every now and then with the music of the hounds was mixed the roar of the other lion and sometimes the far deeper and more awful roar of ...
0
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2answers
90 views

Especially + verb + Subject

I have just found the following sentence: Especially is this true in the field of psychology. I know the rule that says that whenever a sentence begins with an adverb that expresses negativity, it ...
1
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2answers
45 views

Stylistic Inversion

This book titled "EcoJustice Education: Toward Diverse, Democratic, and Sustainable Communities" has this sentence: On the positive side of this system is the seemingly infinite variety of produce ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Position of 'was' at the end of a nominal clause

Can somebody help me categorise the meaning/purpose of the following sentence, and explain why the verb 'was' is at the end of what I hope is a nominal clause? I was shocked by how blue the sky was. ...
3
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1answer
164 views

A question about the sentence “And boy, have we patented it.”

In 2007, Steve Jobs announced the first iPhone. During the presentation, he introduced a feature called Multi-touch; he said, "And boy, have we patented it!" What I am wondering about is the ...
2
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1answer
76 views

Is a dummy pronoun missing in this sentence? What is this grammatical phenomenon?

This sentence from Walden by Henry David Thoreau strikes me as unusual. I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not; and ...
2
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1answer
180 views

''Should you have decided'' Inversion

In an email I received from my university, the following is stated: ''Should you have decided to do the assignment, please send us an email.'' My question is whether the inversion and usage of should ...
4
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3answers
154 views

English Subject-auxiliary inversion

In normal declarative English sentences, let's call them 'canonical' sentences, the verb comes after the subject. Bob is walking the Great Wall of China. Bob likes elephants. But in other types of ...
2
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0answers
28 views

inversion: From this hardship emerged a country

I'd like to know how to analyze the inversion structure below. Has the prepositional phrase from this hardship exchanged its position with the subject a country that is more capable of coping with ...
1
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4answers
112 views

“Is there” or “there is”?

Do I need to use "is there" or "there is" in the following sentence? It is natural to ask under which conditions is there a subtype relation between two given arrow types. If I change "is" to "...
1
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1answer
40 views

Grammatical rule used in “change it will” in the following sentence

The sentence is: That's why the future Internet will have to change, and change it will. This looks like a kind of an inverted sentence but I didn't see such a structure before in the ...
1
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0answers
109 views

Is the sentence, “What I can tell you is that, hidden within the question, lies the answer,” correct?

Here's the sentence: "What I can tell you is that, hidden within the question, lies the answer." It makes sense, but I don't really know it's it right. I figured that the "hidden within the question, ...
1
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1answer
37 views

What construction or classification is “Come what may”

Is this an example of inversion, an idiom, archaic usage, or just incorrect?
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1answer
500 views

Is “Have you some water?” a grammatically correct sentence? [duplicate]

I believe it same as saying "Do you have some water?" Is it?
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2answers
80 views

How do you use “which” when asking a question

I am wondering how to state this question and do not know which one is correct so is #1 correct or #2 correct or are they both grammatically fine? Ferrous metals contain which element? Which element ...
1
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1answer
64 views

What is the structure in the sentence: “The reason scientists believe that…”

I have this sentence from one of my IELTS books: One of the reasons scientists think that there is a link between stress and cancer is the idea that there may be a cancer-prone personality At ...
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1answer
51 views

Can subject–auxiliary inversion in conditionals be used with non-auxiliary (arbitrary) verbs?

Can I say something like Come you there, I'll get you. ? Or should I only say something like Should you come there, I'll get you. ? I understand that it looks like I must use an auxiliary ...
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1answer
38 views

“I wonder, if I pushed the top of her head, would aerosol spray out of her mouth.”

In Kathryn Stockett's The Help one of the main characters Eugenia "Skeeter" Phelan speculates about mate's hair: I wonder, if I pushed the top of her head, would aerosol spray out of her mouth. ...
1
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1answer
43 views

About inversion in a title [closed]

Usually we would say 'the making of XXX' to describe the production process of something. Like, the making of a car...etc. But I just heard somebody said 'XXX making of' as an activity title. The ...
7
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1answer
199 views

Can we have inversion with temporal expressions?

Is it correct to say: "On Friday is a concert at Trafalgar Square." or do we have to say: "On Friday there is a concert at Trafalgar Square." I know that inversion can occur with locative ...
3
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3answers
420 views

“more so than is the case”

Before my question, let me show you its context: A restaurant is a destination in itself as a place to eat, rather than (as with an inn) a place of local gathering or traveler's shelter that ...
8
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4answers
1k views

What is the predicate in “Is he happy?”

In most theories of grammar, sentences can be broken into smaller chunks called phrases and these phrases can be broken into smaller chunks, smaller phrases still. So in the sentence: He is happy. ...
2
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2answers
271 views

What is the VP in a subject-dependent inversion?

A canonical declarative clause consists of a subject and a predicate, the former normally being a noun phrase (NP) and the latter mostly a verb phrase (VP). Therefore, a canonical declarative clause ...
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0answers
427 views

Verb before subject

Is it possible to put a verb before the subject in an ordinary sentence, one that doesn't require inversion? For example: "On the armchair, like a huge petal, withers a bright-red kerchief." Note ...
0
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1answer
47 views

Only through Christ are we saved? [duplicate]

I know this is biblical, my question is whether this is correct or not. Can it be used in modern day? Example : Much like our lives, only by dedicating undivided attention to our people can we teach .....
0
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1answer
57 views

Usage of “Can” as a sentence [duplicate]

I have seen the following paragraph in a sample IELTS writing test but don't understand its grammatical structure. Why is it in question format but affirmative? To conclude, some say that we can ...
0
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1answer
78 views

How would I not know anything

I am not able to frame a question, but here is the situation: in your family your father is doubting your knowledge and he is asking you very simple questions. I want to reply him by saying why ...
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1answer
243 views

“Sitting with Mike is/are the parents of the boy who died”

For the sentence: Sitting with Mike is the parents of the boy who died. Should it be is or are? My instinct says it should be Sitting with Mike are the parents of the boy who died. But ...
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0answers
352 views

Inversion when using “not only ~ but also.”

Is the following sentence correct? Not only can the coverage be easily increased, but the topology can also be more robust.
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4answers
1k views

“Here comes the Queen” versus “Here the Queen comes” [duplicate]

What's the correct one of the following sentences? Here they come. or Here come they. Consider for example: Here comes the sun. This is the title of a famous Beatles song....
2
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2answers
188 views

Conditional clause

Yo, is this sentence correct? It's hard to find a guide that speaks directly to this use of the subjunctive: I realized that this issue needed more active contemplation, were I to find any closure. ...
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0answers
71 views

so ~ that ~ structure vs. inversion of sentence

My colleagues (who are teachers) are divided about the exact structure and meaning of the bolded sentence in the following sentence: Improvements in diet, hygiene and medical science have led to ...
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0answers
196 views

Inversion should happen only once or multiple times in a single sentence?

In a longer, complicated sentence where one repeats the subject, verb and object, does one invert only the first svo or all of them to create a question? Or maybe both cases are correct with a ...
1
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1answer
72 views

What's the inverted form of 'If we had LeBron on our team too, we would’ve won'? [closed]

I have a question regarding a sentence, which goes: If we had LeBron on our team too, we would’ve won. Context: Reporter: “Coach said that, maybe if you guys had a little more time things ...
1
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1answer
295 views

Inversion of word order in a clause beginning with “hardly”

I wrote a sentence: 1." True, a pretty simple model was used, one involving 300 neurons of a creature that hardly anyone would like to have as a pet - a worm, for goodness sake! Then I re-wrote it: ...
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0answers
40 views

Inversion with two clauses?

a) Only after I had explained everything, did he stop blaming and did she stop crying. b) Only after I had explained everything, did he stop blaming and she stop crying. c) Only after I had explained ...
0
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1answer
48 views

How to use an inversion

The following passage comes from a Washington Post article: It was a moment eight months in the making: "Melania Trump bounding down the White House lawn to the vegetable garden made famous by her ...
0
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1answer
97 views

Is inversion correct after “I asked how old…”? [duplicate]

Being curious about the tractor, I asked how old is that tractor? Being curious about the tractor, I asked how old that tractor is? The grammar checker ...
3
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2answers
134 views

Why is inversion used in “The bigger the European Union gets, the more inevitable WILL BE DIFFERENCES between the member countries”?

I saw this sentence in the Cambridge English Advanced Grammar in Use book for teaching grammar: The bigger the European Union gets, the more inevitable will be differences between the member ...