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Questions tagged [intransitive-verbs]

Intransitive verbs do not take a direct object or complement.

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Swear in vs sworn in

Someone elected to office is sworn in and the event is called a swearing-in ceremony. Mr X has been elected chief minister. I saw a public announcement in a newspaper saying Mr X 'will swear in as ...
Ramkay's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
418 views

Is the verb 'come' transitive or intransitive—or, both?

According to Oxford Advanced Learner's dictionary (10th edition), 'Come' is a transitive verb. Here are the following examples: [transitive] come to do something used in questions to talk about how ...
Salman's user avatar
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1 answer
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What is the object of this sentence?

In Modern Family (S06E05), the following sentence is spoken: Lily's parents were wrong about Mrs. Plank. What is the object of this sentence? Is Mrs. Plank the object - because Mrs. Plank is the ...
John Smith's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
675 views

Does using a preposition phrase instead of a direct object change the transitivity of a verb?

A textbook I'm using to refresh some basic grammar states that indirect objects can be identified by it's answering of questions such as 'to whom', 'to what' etc. (fair enough) and they always come ...
Jos's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
743 views

Can "stagnate" be used as a transitive verb?

I know that some verbs can be used either transitively or intransitively. Is it acceptable to use a verb transitively that is generally not used that way? As in: "I can't continue to stagnate ...
Catherine Bares's user avatar
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1 answer
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Would the verb in this sentence be used transitively or intransitively? [closed]

In the following sentence is "painted" being used transitively or intransitively? The sunset painted the sky with a tapestry of fiery colors. I asked ChatGPT about this and it gives ...
Chris Young's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
83 views

With adjective uses of the to-infinitive like 'a place to live in', is the preposition 'in' necessary?

a house to live in a place to live in Does the second example essentially need the preposition 'in'? In the first example, the noun 'house' is a specific place, so I've known to use to-infinitive it ...
Eunjin Park's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
152 views

To dance oneself

LCD Soundsystem sings about Danc(ing) Yrself clean, Sesame Street's muppets sing about Danc(ing) myself to sleep, Alice Cooper about Danc(ing) yourself to death and on its website the British Royal ...
Contactomorph's user avatar
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0 answers
14 views

Intransitive verb + prepositional phrase vs Transitive verb + direct object [duplicate]

What is the difference between them beside their syntax? For example, He (subject) + climbed (intransitive verb) + up the mountain (prepositional phrase) He (subject) + climbed (transitive verb) + the ...
A S's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
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"I might do too"

Today I came read someone write "I might do too" and it struck me as non-idiomatic – but I was unable to identify the offending aspect. Near variations all sound acceptable to my ear: "...
Unrelated's user avatar
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"Doctors often work very long hours": intransitive verb followed by a noun?

I spotted something iffy in "work". Oxford Learner's Dictionaries has A1: [intransitive] noun Doctors often work very long hours. Oxford English Dictionary has b. intransitive. With ...
Gqqnbig's user avatar
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7 answers
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What is a verb for "to be identical"?

What is a verb for the meaning "To be identical"? identical adjective Things that are identical are exactly the same. Collins For instance, instead of saying "Diamonds are never ...
ARGMAN's user avatar
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1 answer
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What’s the meaning of ‘stand hacking‘? [duplicate]

I'm trying to understand this sentence: For hours I stood hacking at the icy ground. Which is in this excerpt of Viktor Frankl’s 1947 book, Man's Search for Meaning: Another time we were at work in ...
William8964's user avatar
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2 answers
408 views

Infinitive as direct object [duplicate]

Merriam's dictionary defines "eat" as an intransitive verb and provides the following definition followed by an example: "to bear the expense of : take a loss on" the team was ...
Eric1982's user avatar
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Are "go into," "come into," and "get into" transitive?

As the subject says. Note the following sentences: "I got into a taxi." "He came into the room." "We went into the store." For some reason, I have always been under the ...
Alex's user avatar
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1 answer
117 views

Is a verb transitive when used only with an indirect object? [closed]

I am learning about indirect objects and transitivity in French, but I believe that my question is also valid in English. Therefore, I'd like to sort this out in English. If a verb is used only with ...
user2153235's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
176 views

In what sense is the “call" in “call for" intransitive

Oxford English Dictionary (www.oed.com) lists “call for" as an intransitive phrasal verb, while other dictionaries such as Macmillan and Longman list it as a transitive phrasal verb. I see that “...
Exp's user avatar
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3 answers
846 views

Verbs that can be used as both passive and active in the same form - how to determine if a verb is a such one? [duplicate]

Some English verbs can be used in the same form in both active and passive meaning. E.g.: (active) I change the world - (passive) the world changes (i.e is being changed). (active) I open the door - (...
whyer's user avatar
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0 answers
110 views

Is it possible to put an intransitive verb in passive voice? [closed]

My teacher told me that we can't convert intransitive verbs like 'walk' into passive voice when there is no object present. For example: He walks every day. But I think we can convert this by saying:...
Righter's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
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What makes be intransitive? How to tell one meaning from the other? [closed]

The STATEMENT MADE BY NATIVES: be is not transitive, that’s why “Whom can he be?” and “Who can be him?” are wrong. If it’s true, why is this correct? I don’t want to be him. My first language is ...
user1425's user avatar
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Forgot in this sentence: Transitive or Intransitive?

"Today is Friday, but Adae forgot." Hi everyone, so I encountered this sentence in a writing book . I believe "forgot" in this context is intransitive since there is no object in ...
meepyer's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
710 views

Enjoy- Intransitive / transitive verb

I know that Enjoy is always used as a transitive verb and only as an intransitive in imperative sentences in some specific context. However, as native speakers, do you think enjoy is correctly used in ...
Lala's user avatar
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1 answer
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Transitive and Intransitive verbs: is 'eat' transitive in 'Don't eat much'?

I do know the definition of transitive and intransitive verbs. But I have a doubt with respect to a specific example which is as follows: Don't eat much. I want to know whether in this sentence, the ...
Kaarthik Ananthanarayanan's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
420 views

Passive Voice with intransitive verbs?

With a sentence like, "He sat on the couch," is sat still being used as an intransitive verb since, in general, prepositional phrases cannot act as direct objects? To me, the prepositional ...
Eric1982's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
2k views

Go Transitive or Intransitive

I'm a little confused by the verb 'go'. I know that it is intransitive. My issue is that I intuitively feel that it may have some transitive uses when used in the context of activities. For example: ...
Timmy's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
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Can 'optimise' be intransitive verb?

Gans calls these ‘prediction machines’, because these algorithms make forecasts about the outcomes of decisions and optimise accordingly (based on definable trends in behavioural data). In this ...
Seulgi So's user avatar
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1 answer
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TO and FOR after transitive Verb

In the below two sentences, how intend(verb) has been used? Transitively or Intransitively? Dictionary is saying that it is used as a transitive verb. But my question is there are TO and FOR after the ...
Bharath Reddy's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
1k views

Put something out to tender

TENDER: (intransitive) followed by for: to make a formal offer or estimate for (a job or contract). noun: the act or an instance of tendering; offer. What does tender mean in put something out to ...
GJC's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Are the infinitives that follow catenative verbs considered object?

I am confused to find objects of catenative verbs , for example i was looking for the verb refuse and it's transitive and intransitive when i found some examples from oxford dictionary but still not ...
samir nour's user avatar
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1 answer
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Which sentence is grammatically correct lay or laid in this situation?

She lay on the beach while her son splashed at the water's edge. or She laid on the beach while her son splashed at the water's edge. Grammarly is indicating that both are correct, but Word Power says ...
Neil's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
41 views

Doesn't need anything between be-verb and to one's advantage?

I saw a sentence with idiom "to one's advantage" in my textbook. After that, It was obviously to my advantage. When I saw this, I thought "why isn't there any complement after was?"...
SG K's user avatar
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2 answers
153 views

Are YouTube creators using "enjoy" in a new intransitive sense?

Many YouTube creators end their videos with a statement similar to If you enjoyed, please remember to click the thumbs-up button! Invariably, there is no explicit direct object for the verb "...
Spencer's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
28 views

Was 'offer' in "(...) that no way of reaching that place would offer, till (...)" used as an intransitive verb?

Is offer used as an intransitive verb in the following passage from Moby-Dick? Much was I disappointed upon learning that the little packet for Nantucket had already sailed, and that no way of ...
John Smith's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
143 views

Confusing incorrect question in my grammar book

The workers _________ $1,000 to plant the trees in the garden. A) paid B) to pay C) paying D) were paid Can you tell me which answer is right and explain why? If here is not the right place for ...
Cetin Sert's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
113 views

'She looked incredible. Then she looked at me'

Am I correct in saying that the verb 'looked' is intransitive in the first phrase, transitive in the second phrase? Is there a name for this type of rhetorical technique playing on the two senses of ...
cunning linguist's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

"Get on": is it transitive, intransitive or both?

I'm new here (in the sense of asking a question, but I often use the site for reference.) I have a question regarding the phrasal verb "get on", or more specifically when used with "with", eg. "get ...
Alex Bennett's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
154 views

be headed: adjectival -ed vs past participle

(Intransitive) go in particular direction: He headed toward the station. (Transitive) cause something to go somewhere: The pilot headed the plane on a northeasterly course. -ed2 (suffix): ...
GJC's user avatar
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22 votes
3 answers
5k views

When to bemoan and when to moan

I've tried looking this up and I've read somewhat unhelpful advice like "to bemoan something is to moan about something". I am mostly aware when one feels correct, and when one does not, but I'm not ...
Dave's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
3k views

"Say" and "said" as transitive and intransitive verbs

I have an interesting question. Is "say" a transitive verb in the case of direct/reported speech? I understand that it can be a transitive verb in cases like "She said the phrase." or "She says the ...
AJK432's user avatar
  • 420
1 vote
2 answers
137 views

This market was finished rebuilding - correct grammar?

On one of the corners of Spitalfields market in London, there's a sign that reads: "This market was finished rebuilding by R. Homer 1893" Is this a clumsy sentence? Is it grammatically correct? ...
user2474226's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
430 views

She wrote to/ him a letter in France

She wrote him a letter in France She wrote to him a letter in France The second sentence is found in Oxford Learners Dictionary. I think there is some ambiguity in the sentences. ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
2k views

Does a transitive verb always require a direct object?

If a verb is only listed in the dictionary as a transitive verb, can it be correctly used without a direct object, i.e. as an intransitive verb? We can use the verb "force" as an example, which is ...
thinkpad22 's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
559 views

Why can go take a gerund? (eg: go shopping; go fishing, go dancing)

I am trying to figure out why go can take a gerund, which is a verb doing the job of a noun, as an object yet the verb go is always intransitive and therefore cannot take an object. I need to make ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 39
-1 votes
2 answers
231 views

Using divorce as an intransitive verb

Can I say "I wish to divorce" or "they wish to divorce by mutual consent" etc? In other words can I use the word "divorce" as an intransitive verb (without an object), or is "get divorced" the correct ...
SR Bhaskar's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
165 views

"impute" as an intransitive verb

I came across a sentence in a Wikipedia article that went like this (MEMRI stands for Middle East Media Research Institute): In 2006, Finkelstein accused MEMRI of editing a television interview he ...
Zebrafish's user avatar
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1 vote
8 answers
2k views

How to use "allow to do something" without mentioning a person?

Instead of the probably correct structure: Our software XYZ allows the user to resize and modify PNG images. I'm looking for a way to do it without specifying a person (or people): Our software ...
Basj's user avatar
  • 171
6 votes
2 answers
847 views

How is transitivity defined in CGEL?

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
JK2's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
435 views

Is "start" used with "fire" as a transitive or an intransitive verb?

Should I say The fire is reported to have started by accident. or The fire is reported to have been started by accident. P.S:Someone told me to use the former because "by accident" implies that no ...
Abdelrahman Eltaher's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
636 views

In the sentence "The wallet has fallen." Is the verb "fallen" being used in the passive form and is it grammatically correct?

I feel like it is grammatically correct, but as a native speaker I am aware that I will say and write things that are not "by the book" when it comes to grammar. I also know that you can have a ...
David McGowan's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
189 views

Verb transitivity in sentences with dummy subjects or with prepositions that look like dummy subjects

Suppose we put in play the rule that lay is used transitively and lies is used intransitively. How do you analyze constructions such as – Where the responsibility (lies/lay) has yet to be ...
Phil Sweet's user avatar