Questions tagged [intransitive]

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What's the correct form of this verb, “speculated”?

in this sentence, how do you analyse the correct form and meaning of the verb "speculated"? The police speculated that the young elk might have been disoriented.... I thought it was ...
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1answer
364 views

Go Transitive or Intransitive

I'm a little confused by the verb 'go'. I know that it is intransitive. My issue is that I intuitively feel that it may have some transitive uses when used in the context of activities. For example: ...
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2answers
691 views

“Get on”: is it transitive, intransitive or both?

I'm new here (in the sense of asking a question, but I often use the site for reference.) I have a question regarding the phrasal verb "get on", or more specifically when used with "with", eg. "get ...
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2answers
163 views

Using divorce as an intransitive verb

Can I say "I wish to divorce" or "they wish to divorce by mutual consent" etc? In other words can I use the word "divorce" as an intransitive verb (without an object), or is "get divorced" the correct ...
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2answers
121 views

What is the grammar rule that states preference (in this example) between “exceeds” or “is exceeding”

A coworker and I have been discussing the grammar of an error message on a computer when downloading a file that is too big. The debate is between whether it should say "The file exceeds the maximum ...
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2answers
606 views

The intransitive usage of “satisfy”

I lighted upon a sentence in the New York Times: Actually almost any tidbit — notably pigs in blankets — that the bar sends my way will satisfy. This usage of satisfy strikes me as uncommon, if ...
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2answers
122 views

Progress: verbs pronounced differently in transitive and intransitive forms - pro'gress vs progre'ss

uncovered during an informal English conversational lesson today, according to my (1970s) Concise Oxford Dictionary, the vi and vt forms of 'progress' do have separate entries, different pronunciation,...
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4answers
71 views

How do you interpret “we can talk tea”?

On a package of tea I found a sentence as follows: If you have any questions, feedback or are not satisfied with this product, please contact us at our details below and we can talk tea. This ...
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1answer
4k views

Can “wait” be used as an intransitive verb? Why? [closed]

"The man was waiting at the side of the road." Book says that "was waiting" is an intransitive verb but why?
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2answers
602 views

Transitive/Intransitive Verbs: Strive Vs Vow

I'm struggling with some semantics around transitive/intransitive verbs. Let me give one specific example to illustrate. The mayor vowed to reduce crime 1 We must all strive to do better 2 Both ...
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0answers
405 views

Should we always use a prepositional object after an intransitive verb?

I arrived at home. vs. I arrived home. "Arrive" is an intransitive verb and it needs a prepositional object, but 'home' is an adverb of place and I don't think any preposition can be used before ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “He died himself.” a correct sentence?

I've checked Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary and I found that die is an intransitive verb most of the time. I checked other dictionaries as well. I didn't find any usage of "die" as per which we ...
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2answers
235 views

“Unwanted events happened”

"Unwanted events happened" couldn't be an example for passive because there's no objective in the sentence, it's just like this example, "the child cried", because "happen" is an intransitive verb. ...
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3answers
1k views

What is the real difference between direct objects and prepositional phrases?

I'm a fairly new ESL teacher. One of my students asked me recently why "...to comply with the rules of grammar" needs a preposition (with), whereas "...to follow the rules of grammar" doesn't. After ...
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2answers
1k views

Can “abscond” be used as a transitive verb?

BACKGROUND All the online dictionaries that I've consulted, Oxford, Merriam-Webster, etc, list "abscond" as an intransitive verb, a verb that does not take an object. Not unless with the ...