Questions tagged [intonation]

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1answer
51 views

Is there a word for wordlessly humming words/phrases? [duplicate]

"Yeah-huh", "Nuh-uh". "Ah." "Oh." "Um." "Ew." "Huh!" "Huh?" "Ehh." "I don't know." Tone and breath are all that separate all of these 'm' sounds. You can say a lot without opening your mouth....
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3answers
1k views

Rising and falling intonation

I have been told that rising and falling intonation can change the meaning of a sentence. For me as a non-native speaker of English this may sometimes cause misunderstanding. In the following ...
4
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1answer
75 views

Young native-speaking males emphasizing deep voices

Recently a possibly new speech pattern has come to my attention and I am wondering whether it is genuine or whether I am mistaken. It is young, male native speakers emphasizing a deep, "rough" voice. ...
0
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1answer
57 views

How would changing the stress position in descriptive phrases change the meaning?

Usually in a phrase composed of an adjective followed by a noun, the noun gets the most stress, and in a phrasal verb like (go on, sit down, stand up) the preposition gets the most stress. However ...
0
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1answer
255 views

intonation affected the meaning

Explain how the changes in intonation affect the meaning of the following sentences: "My brother bought her a red dress." "My brother bought her a red dress." "My brother bought her a red dress." "My ...
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2answers
79 views

Higher pitch on the first few words of a sentence? [closed]

I've recently been watching some streamers on TwitchTV. I noticed sometimes they used a higher pitch at the beginning of a sentence for content/important words. For example in a conversation ...
1
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1answer
414 views

Does word pronunciation change when it's in a sentence?

I’m Chinese and am learning English. When I watch video materials from US and UK, I've noticed a phenomenon: in British, a word may sound much different when it's said in a sentence compared to when ...
0
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0answers
60 views

What kind of English that the narration of the starting part of A.I. movie?

I'm watching the A.I. Artificial Intelligence. And I just realized that the pronunciation and intonation is special. The pronunciation is very strict. Hear the part .. economic link the c ends with k ...
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1answer
118 views

About: intonation_''wh-question''

This is a simple one. Could you tell me what "Carbonara" is? Now. The question is: Which intonation should be used? Is it a yes/no question or a wh-question? -It is a polite request for ...
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0answers
1k views

Differences between American and British question intonation?

In interactions with American and British people, I've noted Americans tend to have rise-fall (↗↘) intonation while I've heard the British having rise-fall-rise (↗↘↗) intonation while asking questions....
0
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1answer
195 views

Is it always necessary to use a falling tone in referring expressions?

Is it always necessary to use a falling tone in referring expressions? I know that it is sometimes used but do native speaker sometimes ignore it?
-1
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1answer
85 views

Which words of this sentence will get stressed and a falling pitch [closed]

The sentence is: I finished high school in 2010. The part I want to stress is the year, 2010. Which words of this sentence will get stressed and a falling pitch? How do you describe the way that ...
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4answers
448 views

Confused about intonation! Will intonation modify the the pronunciation of a word in the dictionary?

This Video at 2:55 said that "when we have a list, we use rising intonation in each phrase until we get the final item of the list... the final item of the list will have falling intonation" Ok, let ...
6
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5answers
5k views

Negative word for someone whose voice pitch varies too much? (opposite of monotone)

The closest word I can come up with is "dynamic", but that has positive connotations. I'm looking for a word for someone whose voice is dynamic to the extreme--overly varied intonation. The best I ...
1
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0answers
242 views

Pronunciation of Who is it?

I heard the question "Who is it?" in a movie. [Person A] knocked on a door. [Person B] came to open the door, but before that he asks "Who is it?" This three syllables question can be pronounced ...
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2answers
557 views

Is it correct to use “no?” after a question to get some kind of confirmation [duplicate]

We are going to the club tonight, no? Is it correct?
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2answers
181 views

How can we distinguish “uptalk” from a real question?

uptalk or high rising terminals is an intonation pattern where declarative statements occur with yes/no question intonation. "It is used when the speaker is establishing common ground with the ...
0
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3answers
806 views

Where should I put stress in these sentences?

I am studying intonation and stress in English, and would like advice on where to put stress on these sentences. "How do you do?" Does it sound like this? HOW do you DO? Where should I put stress on ...
0
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1answer
3k views

Ending a declarative statement with a question mark? [duplicate]

Recently, there was a debate as to when one can legitimately end a declarative statement with a question mark, like writing “I don’t know?” as an answer, and what that could possibly mean. The ...
11
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5answers
2k views

Intention of rising pitches

I have been wondering about the rising pitch used in almost every sentence, by especially young Americans. What is the purpose/intention of rising pitch except in questions? Is it friendly and ...