Questions tagged [international]

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How to deal with currency symbols when combined with other units

It seems that pretty much all documentation I've read is clear on where to place the currency symbol when dealing with currency amounts in English (let us assume English from UK for this example): £...
Peque's user avatar
  • 103
2 votes
2 answers
83 views

Word for a book that functions as a non-travel guide to a country, like "Biography" or "Hagiography" perhaps - but for a nation

So I'm not looking at an Atlas or a Compendium or a Travel Guide - I'm picturing those children's books (though doesn't need to be children's) just titled things like "Nigeria" or "...
Al Jebra's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
109 views

Why dj instead of j?

I have seen multiple times that in English texts there is a dj to sound /dʒ/ instead of just a single j (If J is at the beginning of the word). Even if those aren't native English words, we already ...
Snack Exchange's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

What is the meaning of 'national' as in eg 'Australian national'? [closed]

From here: https://academia.stackexchange.com/questions/115930/career-prospects-for-a-math-phd-student-in-pure-math I am an Australian national and want to live in Australia long term. what exactly ...
BCLC's user avatar
  • 135
-2 votes
3 answers
381 views

Is "green ones" not slang for money? [closed]

I wish I could bring in some green ones. I cannot bring in the green ones. I'm making tons of the green ones. Are these proper English/American English sentences? Can you use "green ones" ...
M Kelzenberg's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

"That Da Vinci kid needs watched your highness."?

I read this today: That Da Vinci kid needs watched your highness. I assume they meant: That Da Vinci kid needs watched, your highness. The part I'm confused about is the "needs watched" ...
C. Kofler's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
305 views

Where and when did the practice of using two spaces in the beginning of each sentence start, and is it still recommended?

For many years (decades at this point), I've noticed that, at least in plaintext environments, "serious" and/or "old-timer" people seem to always type like this: This is a sentence.  And here comes ...
NotExactlyAnExpert's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
55 views

That secondary adjectival form for two-nation matters

In English, we know each country or nation has its own derived adjective. Examples England - English Wales - Welsh Poland - Polish France - French China - Chinese India - Indian Russia - Russian etc ...
icelava's user avatar
  • 151
-2 votes
1 answer
63 views

Using 'the' before a language [duplicate]

Is it right to use 'the' before a language like 'the Japanese', 'the Hindi', etc.?
Kithsiri's user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
4k views

"Foreign students" vs "International students"

An etymological doubt has hit me. To my surprise, the "writing enhancement software," Grammarly flagged the phrase "foreign students" and suggested "International students" in its place. The reasoning:...
Dennis R. Hidalgo's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
8k views

what do you call the person who likes to do things by himself?

what do you call the person who likes to do things by himself ? I mean to say like do everyday life work from cleaning cloths to preparing food... no matter how hard the works become. Having such a ...
Giliweed's user avatar
57 votes
9 answers
20k views

Is "faff" well understood outside Britain?

Google says "faff" is just British English. Is it well understood in other English speaking regions? If not, is there an international alternative? faff BRITISH informal verb: faff; 3rd person ...
callum's user avatar
  • 1,002
5 votes
0 answers
25k views

Is the meaning of **I'll keep an eye out for it** understood outside of the UK ? [closed]

I sometime write in emails : I'll keep an eye out for it OR I'll keep an eye out for your email Im in the UK and i think that the majority on english speakers in the UK would understand this, ...
sam's user avatar
  • 153
3 votes
2 answers
4k views

Difference between 'REVERENCE' and 'DEFERENCE'

MY EFFORT: this a straight-forward question. I was practising for 'SAT' and met a question which required knowledge of difference between the afore-mentioned two words. I have searched the following 2 ...
Shivanshu Gupta's user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
132 views

How will the new Oxford "Academy of English" appoint its members? [closed]

The new Oxford Academy, announced yesterday, we are told will draw members from around the world. Mirroring the Academie Francaise it expects to become the authoritative guide to spoken and written ...
WS2's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
609 views

How does this word sound to English-speakers? [closed]

I want to name my project with a word from Ukrainian language. Transliterating it would be spelled as Ostriv. And I'd like to be sure that it doesn't sound bad for English-speakers or isn't hard to ...
Yevheniy8's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
265 views

Is the word 'Internet' a global word? [closed]

Is the word 'internet' regarded as a global word, meaning that it's been borrowed as-is into every language? And if so, is it the first word to be used globally in every language? Edit: looking at the ...
user3886650's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
495 views

Is rhyming slang used in other parts of the world than London? [closed]

From Wikipedia: Rhyming slang is a form of phrase construction in the English language that is especially prevalent in dialectal English from the East End of London; hence the alternative name, ...
Tushar Raj's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
655 views

Why is English used internationally? [closed]

Why is English so globally prevalent and pervasive on the web? Is this because Britishers ruled the world decades ago, thereby disseminating English to those respective regions?
Shailesh Kumar's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
1k views

How would an English speaker pronounce "valid" with a circumflex over the A?

My branding department (read my friend from work) has suggested the word "vâlid" with a circumflex over the A as a way to brand my product. He just likes the way a lowercase a looks in typography. ...
makerofthings7's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
1k views

Does plantation have a negative context outside the US?

In the United States, the word plantation almost always conjures up images of Southern slave plantations (sorry, Rhode Island). Is a similarly-negative context associated with the word in other ...
Amory's user avatar
  • 1,283
2 votes
2 answers
504 views

US English vs UK English [closed]

Of course, I am not a native English speaker nor a good one (or at least not as good as I would like to be). I know there are some differences between UK and US English, but, from my perspective, they ...
Paul92's user avatar
  • 182
2 votes
3 answers
1k views

"right of say" -- legal term? poor translation?

I'm looking at a political document where Country A is saying Country B has no right of say over Area C. A cursory search did not turn up a legal term but I do not have an adequate legal dictionary ...
cmcf's user avatar
  • 175
8 votes
5 answers
4k views

What is the best term in (global) copywriting: "sticky tape", "tape", "scotch tape" or "sellotape"?

Perhaps "sticky tape" is childish? Sellotape is British? It should be general and indicate the transparent, adhesive tape. Thanks for your input.
Tintels's user avatar
  • 81
6 votes
2 answers
2k views

Recommended pronunciation of international English for foreigners

There are some differences in the pronunciation of English in USA and in UK. Furthermore, there are differences in the pronunciation in different areas of the same country. Examples: "go" is ...
Squall's user avatar
  • 195
8 votes
4 answers
41k views

"Named for" vs. "named after"

As a Brit, I'm used to the phrase named after being used to say how something got its name. For example, in Wikipedia's List of eponymous roads in London, we read that Addison Road is named after the ...
Reg Edit's user avatar
  • 602
2 votes
1 answer
386 views

Looking for a list of "english words" that exist in other languages, but with different meanings

I had a terrible misunderstanding with a semi-conservative Turkish woman who was offended when I said "Let's have brunch, and I'll bring some platonic female friends" I'm told that in Turkey, "...
makerofthings7's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
562 views

What is Mongolian Trait ? when referring to medical scores of a newborn child in USA [closed]

What is Mongolian Trait? I have been unable to find the meaning to this My Niece was classified as having Mongolian Trait ..
user57879's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
789 views

How to write in English for international readers? [closed]

How to write in English for international readers? I'm not a native English speaker but I've been learning the language for many years in many fields (Mathematics, Physics, Mechanical Engineering and ...
Francisco Presencia's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
5k views

Is English considered a trade language/lingua franca?

English is used in commerce around the world. Is it officially considered a "lingua franca/trade language? If yes, is there a way to find out what percentage of non-English populations that have ...
Sarah's user avatar
  • 217
28 votes
8 answers
25k views

Languages understandable to English-speakers without learning

There are groups of languages that are mutually intelligible. For example, as a Russian, I can partially understand what is said to me in Ukrainian, Belorussian, Bulgarian, Czech, and some other ...
Highstaker's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
2k views

Reversing name order [closed]

My current task is to create a (programming) algorithm which reverts a name's order. This since my country's formal name-listing order is different from international ones. The standard is often: ...
Zar's user avatar
  • 117
4 votes
4 answers
47k views

What's the correct way to write the general location of someone in the USA? [closed]

I'd like to write where someone is from, on a website with an international context. The objective is to balance style, brevity and correctness. I only need country-level resolution, so if someone is ...
Yaniv Aknin's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
624 views

How is "World English" difficult for native speakers of English? [closed]

There is a newly used term, World English (WE). It is nobody's mother tongue. It is spoken across the world, for example, at check-in desks, airports, international trade fairs, world cup football ...
betül's user avatar
  • 39