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Questions tagged [intensifying-adverbs]

The tag has no usage guidance.

3
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2answers
82 views

How recent is the use of “so” as in “I'm so full”, and did it originate in US or UK English?

On another site somebody has claimed that "so" in constructions like "I'm so full" is "modern California-style young people's colloquial English". But is it? I'm over 50, I'm a native English speaker,...
0
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2answers
49 views

Is using the word “very” always allowed or is it better to limit the usage?

I noticed that I'm using the word very quite often. I'd say: I use it very often. For example: I find search engines very helpful. I'm very happy for you. Your are very good at that. He's very sad ...
1
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0answers
43 views

Can 'too much tired' replace 'much too tired' in this construction? [closed]

In the following clause of result, would it be possible to use 'too much tired' in place of 'much too tired'? She is much too tired to go out.
1
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0answers
12 views

Can an increase be negative? [duplicate]

I'm working on an email to my supervisor with feedback about department meetings. I want to say: Our meetings have been increasingly less productive recently. I could probably re-word it to say "...
0
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3answers
62 views

“Typical liberal bulls-t” or “typically liberal bulls-t”?

My liberal friend wrote that he's gonna do some research soon. I asked, "Into what?" "[Redacted.] Typically liberal bullshit," he replied self-depricatingly. Then he corrects himself: "*typical" But ...
-2
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1answer
118 views

Doesn't “I may/might possibly do something,” sound pleonastic?

The question is to do with the expression of degrees of certainty: modal auxiliary will expresses certainty, whereas modal auxiliary may/might expresses uncertainty, doubt; "Someone may/might do ...
2
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2answers
252 views

Well as an adverb modifying an adjective

I notice that there has been a change in the word well. Examples are: She's well nice. It's well good. Is this a West of England term (I lived there for a while), or has it just entered the ...
3
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2answers
80 views

difference between “remains only” and “only remains”

I wrote the following in an article. It remains only to eliminate the intersections which can be proven to be empty. My proofreader corrected to the following by changing the word order. It ...
1
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2answers
178 views

Can intensifiers intensify nouns?

So from what I've gathered intensifiers intensify either adjectives (modifiers) or adverbs (or adverbial phrases) but can they intensify nouns? eg. "A long time ago your heroic grandfathers helped ...
3
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1answer
2k views

what word class do the words 'so' and 'really' belong to? (intensifiers or adverbs)

Some sources say that 'so' and 'really' are intensifiers and the dictionary says 'so' and 'really' are adverbs, which leaves me confused. Are they intensifiers, adverbs or both? Are intensifiers a ...
0
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2answers
67 views

What do you call when you offer someone to help but they don't know that your intention for helping is for your own motive [closed]

Suppose i tell you i will help you in something. Or i offer you something as a gift. You are delighted. But you don't have any idea that i am not ingenuously helping you. I have some sole-purpose ...
2
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1answer
332 views

Why is “extremely longer” not correct (according to the ACT)?

The sentence that included the question was: In addition, LEDs last far longer than standard bulbs. Question: Which of the following alternatives to the bolded portion would NOT be acceptable? ...
1
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2answers
820 views

What's the dinstinction between these intensifiers, such as very, quite, rather, pretty, extremely, etc.? [closed]

Word choice and usage: I'm always curious about the the usage of intensifiers, such as very, quite, rather, pretty, extremely, etc.. I also remember my teacher told there was a turn of tone when using ...
0
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1answer
943 views

'Just' as adverb and…?

"If you would just listen for a moment…" "If you would listen just for a moment…" Subtly different meanings, but in both cases 'just' is adverbial. In the first sentence, 'just' modifies listen. In ...
3
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1answer
569 views

Contradiction of “only so much”

I was taught that so means very. "You are so busted," means, "You are very busted". Now because of people saying things like, "I can only do so much," I thought they were saying, "I can only do ...
1
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2answers
196 views

Can medium intensifiers be ranked by the strength of intensification?

Here are the examples of adjectival intensification: It's quite cold here in March. It's pretty cold here in March. It's fairly cold here in March. It's rather cold here in March. To ...
7
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3answers
787 views

“Stories are so much a part of our lives that many people seldom think about them.” : The use of 'so' and 'so much' as intensifiers

There are 176 hits in COCA for [be] so much a part of, including the title and: 1- It actually is so much a part of life. 2- Law is so much a part of me, I don't think I'll ever be able to let ...
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1answer
326 views

What are the rules to use “so”, “Such” or very [closed]

Why do I say "such a Jerk" and I Can't say "so Jerk" or "very Jerk"?
11
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3answers
8k views

Why are things often “very tasty”, but rarely “very delicious”

When I saw this ELL question it struck me that very delicious didn't sound vary "natural" to me. Checking Google NGrams, I find that relatively speaking, toothsome food is five times more likely to ...
2
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1answer
816 views

Past progressive with “always”

I am a student learning English. I learned in a class that either present or past progressive can be used to express a negative reaction to a situation. The explanations on the lecture note the ...
1
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3answers
530 views

Legality of sentence involving the word “real” [duplicate]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? I bought a real heavy book. I feel it should have been a really heavy, but I heard people use a real heavy all the time.
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2answers
2k views

Near-universally vs nearly universally

Concerning style, usage, and correctness: what is the difference in meaning (and therefore usage & correctness) between these two phrases? A quick search reveals both are in use. Also, what ...
0
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1answer
510 views

Use of “If you really want to”

If somebody says, "If you really want to leave me, then let me know," which reply would be correct in the English language—"Yes I do" or "Yes I really do"?
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2answers
3k views

A question on 'full' Vs 'fully', both as 'adverbs'

In order to modify an adjective or adverb, we use an adverb in English, as in "completely insane" or "It went completely out of hand". Now 'full', though mainly used as an adjective, occurs in English ...
4
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1answer
875 views

We did it at exactly the right time vs We did it at the exactly right time.

I know the first example is correct and I'm pretty sure the second is incorrect, but I wonder why. So, we can say "I saw an extremely angry dog", but not "I saw extremely an angry dog." When do we ...
3
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3answers
2k views

The day started off incredibly terribly?

Is it grammatically correct to say: The day started off incredibly terribly. My reasoning is that it is, since this is correct: The day started off terribly. The manner in which the day ...
1
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2answers
302 views

“Thirty times weaker”: Using a multiplier to describe the lack of something [duplicate]

I was watching CNN's coverage of the earthquake that struck northern California this morning, and I heard the following exchange between the CNN anchor and a seismologist, Walter Hays: ANCHOR: ...
1
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1answer
307 views

Using “So” Followed by a Noun Phrase to Express Boredom, Disgust, Tediousness, Dullness, Banality

In the BBC TV series Sherlock’s episode two from series three, “The Empty Hearse", John Watson waxes maudlin over being left out of the loop for two years regarding Sherlock’s faked death. Sherlock ...
3
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1answer
3k views

Why do we use “awfully” as an intensifier?

First, consider this sentence: We lost the game because we played awfully. Since "awful" means "very bad," it makes sense that "awfully" means "very badly." Now, consider these two sentences: ...
1
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2answers
4k views

Is “further strengthen” or “further bolster” redundant?

For example, To further strengthen my graduate school application, I studied Spanish in Argentina for a semester. The wording seems redundant and awkward to me, but it's common and I'd like some ...
1
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2answers
3k views

Shall I use 'thus' or 'thusly'? [duplicate]

Which is correct? ...others are compensated thus. ...others are compensated thusly. This page says 'thusly' is incorrect: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thusly However without the 'ly' is ...
1
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2answers
4k views

How do you modify an adverb with another adverb?

This is the case I have in mind. I wish to express that impact acted in a way that was severely adverse. It impacted her severely adversely. The proposed text above doesn't feel right at all, ...
2
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6answers
10k views

Is there a way to intensify “blooming” in “The flowers are blooming”?

In some languages, for example, in Korean, it is possible to intensify the act of blooming. For example, using the phrase 핍니다 would imply blooming, for example, simply "The flowers are blooming". ...
19
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7answers
1k views

Is there an acceptable corresponding negative to “well off”?

When we wish to refer to people who are living an affluent lifestyle or simply enjoying favorable circumstances in any particular area, we often say they are well off. So far so good. But ...
4
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2answers
25k views

Adverb placement: “There is still” vs. “there still is”

I believe the following sentences are grammatically correct and that perhaps the latter has an emphasizing effect on still in certain contexts. There is still some time left. There still is some ...
5
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1answer
636 views

When and how did “pretty” enter English as an intensifying adverb?

Today I saw an idiomatic road sign: "Pretty Muddy". I found this lack of strict English on a road sign unusual (on par with my "Dead Slow" official speed limit sign in Leeds, pic below), but as it ...
26
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5answers
561k views

“Thank you very much” vs. “Thank you so much”

Some people used to say: Thank you very much. Where others say: Thank you so much. Could anybody please explain what differences there may be between those, whether of correctness or ...
3
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5answers
1k views

Placement of 'Little'

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, 'little' as an adverb could mean: not much; only slightly Is there a preference among these sentences? He little helped his ...