Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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0answers
165 views

“Helping you do something” or “Helping you to do something”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? In the phrase "Helping you to master Russian", is it correct to ...
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1answer
284 views

Position of verbals

In the first sentence, We move the infinitive to the end of the sentence and place a prepatory object after verb. But when we use gerund, we keep it after verb as in second sentence . I was wondering ...
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4answers
758 views

Is “go on +verb root” grammatically right?

I came across the line, "he went on explain (a metaphor) in the clip," at the end of the following sentence of the article, "How to insult your political opponents" appearing in New Yorker magazine (...
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5answers
2k views

Is it “to be left free to do something” or “to be let free to do something”?

I know "to leave someone alone" and "to let someone be on their own". What happens when the adjective is followed by a verb (in the infinitive)? Is it "*Leave me free to do whatever I want." / "*I ...
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4answers
9k views

It is very difficult to solve. vs. It is too difficult to solve [closed]

'It is very difficult to solve.' Is this sentence above grammatically correct? Or does it have to be corrected as 'It is too difficult to solve.' ?
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3answers
5k views

Do I need to add “to” in every clause in this sentence?

Working in the field helps us to learn how to apply theories to solve real-world problems, to apply […], and to […]. Are the "to" after each comma necessary?
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2answers
243 views

“We do is to complain” or “We complain about it”?

I was just reading a News paper. and found this sentence: Our impatient host could not understand that our security personnel are under so mush pressure in such tense red alert situations. They ...
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2answers
271 views

fun to make and fun to eat

“These cookies are fun to make and especially fun to eat.” (source) Semantically, these cookies is both to-infinitves’ object; and to-infinitves seems to be the semantic subject of both funs, as is ...
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4answers
214 views

Which object is modified by the infinitive in this sentence?

The sentence is like this: Governments must ensure that their major cities receive the financial support they need in order to thrive. I'm not sure about the to thrive. Does this sentence mean: ...
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6answers
563 views

“Plan not to retire” or “Plan to not retire”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Order of “not” with infinitive Someone edited my post on another StackExchange.com site to change the former to the latter. Which is better? I wrote the phrase ...
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1answer
981 views

Not sure if this is correct or not: “the ability to be able to”

The sentence: Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them. Is it to be able ...
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1answer
144 views

“No one is born hating…” vs. “No one is born to hate…”

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, ...
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2answers
117 views

“He is said to have known peo­ple” vs “He is said to know peo­ple”? [closed]

I came aross a ques­tion like this: As a pub­lic re­la­tions of­fi­cer, he is said ________ some very in­flu­en­tial peo­ple. to know to have known There are two avail­able an­swers ...
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1answer
2k views

Why is the sentence “I go to the US for studying English.” wrong?

I heard the sentence "I go to the US for studying English." is wrong. Can the preposition "for" as purpose be used in this case? Could you teach me the reason why this sentence is wrong?
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2answers
2k views

the best thing to do is (to) concentrate on

The best thing to do is to concentrate on something else. I've known in the sentence like that 'to' should be omitted. So, I wonder if the sentence is grammatical. *The source of the information was ...
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3answers
2k views

“Attempts to acquaint” vs. “attempts at acquainting”

The research study is an eye-opener and attempts to acquaint/attempts at acquainting us with the problems of poor nations. For me, attempts to acquaint sounds more apt. But I am not sure about ...
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4answers
1k views

“thanks to (command)”

A friend who works in business says that she has been hearing a lot of polite commands worded as e.g. "thanks to ask any questions at the end of the presentation" (she has also seen this written a few ...
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2answers
203 views

Is this usage of “know to be” correct — “They want to eat food they know to be good for them”?

In the following sentence, is the construction know + to + infinitive grammatical? They want to eat food they know to be good for them. The dictionary says that "know to do something" is a ...
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2answers
10k views

To use “to” or not to? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Gerund or infinitive: When to use which? You like to read books. You like reading books. The second second sentence seems to be better than the first. Why is that? ...
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2answers
2k views

Bare infinitive and gerund participle

I saw him kick the stone. According to my reference book this sentence is grammatically correct even though the verb 'kick' is in present tense while the action has already happened. If I write like ...
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2answers
699 views

Infinitive form of helping verb

I had a confusion between Infinitive form of the verb and the base form of the verb. But this LINK explains the difference between infinitive and base form of the verb. Base form: be, have, ...
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1answer
265 views

To do something is something - what use of the infinitive is this?

I teach English and a student of mine recently came out with the following sentence: She thinks that to become a marketing manager is the opportunity she seeks for. I thought this was a curious ...
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1answer
3k views

Infinitive in news headlines

I'm a little bit confused with understanding news titles. I recently started to read news in English willing to improve my language skills, but there is one thing that I totally can't understand (and ...
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3answers
448 views

“It takes” + infinitive vs. present participle

Is it grammatically correct to say "It took me five hours travelling to the US"? Most people would say "It took me five hours to travel to the US." I wonder if the infinitive is always the only ...
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1answer
4k views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is more ...
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1answer
276 views

Retire Vs Retirement

I am confused between the two: My father is due to retire/retirement in a few months and is restless. According to my understanding, retire sounds more appropriate. But I am not sure. Could anyone ...
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1answer
706 views

Is “What I'm doing is” followed by an infinitive or gerund form? [closed]

Title says everything. American English please (but if it's different in British English, please point that out as well)
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2answers
207 views

Correct usage of phrase “about + to”

I'd like to know whether the usage of 'about to' is correct in these sentences: I'm about to hate you. and I'm about to start hating you. Are either, or both, of these examples wrong?
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2answers
8k views

active voice and passive voice in the infinitive construction

Here are two sentences: That is an interesting question to answer. It is an easy sentence to translate. I am very confused about why we should use the active voice rather than the passive ...
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2answers
648 views

what's the meaning when “be” is followed by an infinitive

"If two Weeping Angels were to look at each other at the same time, they would be trapped in stone form until an outside force moves them apart." My questions are about the phrase "were to look": ...
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1answer
651 views

Should I factor-out “to” in a series of infinitives?

Which of the following two forms of the sentence is better? "Managers can use these findings to bound estimates, to assess the realism of road maps, to recognise unsustainable growth, to judge the ...
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1answer
3k views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
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2answers
5k views

Infinitive or Gerund for celebration of an event?

Which of the following sentences would be correct in a baby shower invitation. My grandparents are looking forward to celebrate my arrival in February. My grandparents are looking forward to ...
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2answers
1k views

Can a verb in the -ing form take a direct object?

Here is the example: We condemn such behavior that can risk damaging a company’s brand and reputation. I think, the 'a company's brand reputation' is the object of 'damaging'. And the whole phrase ...
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1answer
46 views

Gerund or infinitive and WHY

WHY is this sentence incorrect? "All that they can do is preparing as much as they can." I know it should be "All they can do is (to) prepare as much as they can." But, for the life of me I can't ...
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1answer
41 views

help someone (to) do with DIFFERENT MEANINGS

I have gone through (almost?) all the posts pertaining "help somebody (to) do" to find the two forms (with "to" or without) are the same in meaning. It came to my attention that bare infinitives in "...
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1answer
59 views

What does this question ask? What is the meaning of “for the law” in this sentence?

The sentence is: "Is it ever justifiable for the law to treat some people as inferior to others?" Can anyone explain the meaning of this question? I am confused about especially the "for the law" ...
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3answers
433 views

When should I add “to” before an infinitive in a parallelism sentence?

Here is a sentence I wrote: All he can do, as it turns out, is to stay by her side, take her to wherever he goes and hope someday she will wake up. I added to ahead of take... in the first place, ...
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1answer
17k views

“dedicated to helping people ” or “dedicated to help people” [closed]

I have this sentence: I'm a volunteer in an organization that is dedicated to helping people find answers about life in the Bible. or it should be I'm a volunteer in an organization that is ...
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1answer
325 views

“After taking a rest, I get ready for job”

Is the following sentence grammatical? After taking a rest, I get ready for job. I think the statement above sounds informal. I'm also unclear as to what it means. Would English native ...
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1answer
171 views

participle phrase or to-infinitive phrase

In response to the long-term measures recommended by the School Board, the then Principal initiated the Pledge Day on “Clean LA", to encourage all schools to make the “Clean LA” commitment on that ...
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2answers
911 views

What is the meaning of “ I was only to do that”? [closed]

I am a non-native English learner. Does the sentense "I was only to do that" mean "There was nothing I could do"? Gramatically what is "only" here? Is it an adjective or an adverb to modify " be to"?...
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2answers
92 views

“We have to be hard on you, you have to be cured”

"We have to be hard on you, you have to be cured," is grammatically correct? Shouldn't it be "We have to be hard on you; you have to be cured," as these are two independent clauses. I've seen it in ...
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2answers
606 views

Ellipsis in “can and have occurred”

The side effects can and have occurred. The omitted verb is an infinitive (occur) but the written verb is a past participle (occurred). Is this sentence grammatically correct and suitable for formal ...
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1answer
6k views

“I hope I enjoy myself very much” is this correct?

I hope I enjoy myself very much I came across the above expression when I was reading something, the writer wasn't a native English speaker. She was talking about visiting a place she wanted to go, ...
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1answer
185 views

Pres. perfect + going to + past infinitive

I have seen the following sentence: For four months now John has been going to have finished his novel by today. I hope I understand it (I assume it says that he has been trying to finish his ...
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1answer
441 views

usage of infinitive after feel [duplicate]

What is grammatically wrong with the sentence, "I feel to eat."? After the verb feel, can the infinitive of another verb be used?
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1answer
766 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.? [closed]

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
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2answers
5k views

What is the difference between “so to do” and “to do so”

I believe that both are correct. I.e. I have got the Christmas Eve off this year but my partner has failed so to do. is equivalent to I have got the Christmas Eve off this year but my partner ...
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1answer
8k views

Is 'thought it to be' grammatically correct?

Does If man continues to scathe all of Earth and its seas, then this isn’t the world I thought it to be make sense? Or should I just replace the 'to' with 'would'?