Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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2
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3answers
18k views

Determining main verb of a sentence which match with subject + verb + to + verb pattern

If I have sentences Member is allowed to change himself back I want to go to school He needs to stop What are the predicate of these sentences? Are they allowed - want - need, or change -...
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2answers
1k views

which is correct “to be as flexible as possible” or just “as flexible as possible”

On our website's homepage we have the following sentence: We make our software to be as flexible as possible so you can maintain and visualize the data that is important to YOU. One of my friends ...
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1answer
1k views

“can't do anything except eating” vs. “can't do anything except eat”

My dog is so lazy. It can't do anything except eating food. My dog is so lazy. It can't do anything except eat food. Which one is right? We asked this question in two different forums but we ...
2
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1answer
3k views

Using too many 'to's in a sentence?

This may be more of a stylistic question than anything else, but I'm hoping for some general rules about using the word 'to' in a sentence and when it might be used too many times. For example, I'm ...
2
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1answer
295 views

Is the infinitive at the end of “I did whatever I wanted to do” necessary?

In a statement such as "I did whatever I wanted to do," or "I wore whatever clothes I wanted to wear," are the infinitives "to do" and "to wear" necessary? Is it improper to say "I did whatever I ...
2
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2answers
860 views

Force someone to do what you want [to] [do]

1) Don't force your friends to do what you want to do. 2) Don't force your friends to do what you want to. 3) Don't force your friends to do what you want. I think 1) is 'Don't force your friends ...
2
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2answers
95 views

“This video shows a heart transplant take place” or “taking place”?

Which is the correct version of this sentence: This video shows a heart transplant take place. This video shows a heart transplant taking place. I have a hunch that both are correct, but ...
2
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4answers
7k views

How do I identify “infinitive clauses/phrases” and “subjects”?

In sentences such as the following, there is (as I understand it) an infinitive clause and an infinitive phrase. Which part is the infinitive clause and which part is the infinitive phrase? And what ...
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1answer
2k views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
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2answers
985 views

Can object complements make any difference to sentences?

I'm reading a grammar book, and I have some questions. A. We ate the fish raw. I want Sue drunk. I prefer the music soft. I like coffee black. We drank the beer cold. This type of ...
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1answer
1k views

Grammatically correct form of “Way <infinitive phrase>”

There's a reasonably common idiomatic phrasing in the form "Way <infinitive phrase>!" that denotatively means "You did a good job of <whatever>", but is almost always used ironically. ...
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2answers
529 views

Usage Difference between to-infinitive and participle

I came across this question today. Q: the correct expression for blank. The documents ____ immediate attention are on top. 1. Requiring 2. To require I know the answer is ...
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1answer
330 views

Important to learn is this stuff

This song is fun to sing. This pizza is too hot to eat. Is the infinitive there considered a complement of the predicate adjective?
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2answers
378 views

Infinitive or gerund [duplicate]

So, I've got this phrase: ''Far from fleeing monotony, animals crave it, and what they most dread is to see it end.'' Can someone explain me why it is written ''to see it end'' rather than ''to see ...
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2answers
1k views

Why can't I use the word 'to' after the verb 'helped'?

I know it is incorrect to say, "They helped to her" and that it should be, "They helped her", but why is the word "to" not needed? And yet the word to is in this sentence: "They helped to get her free....
2
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1answer
175 views

A question about “to becoming” [duplicate]

Would this sentence be correct? Being scared is the first step to becoming free. The more I look at it, the less clear it becomes.
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1answer
1k views

Apart from + infinitive

A piece of news from the BBC reads as follows [emphasis in the original]: The UN has said very little on the matter, apart from to insist it is immune from legal proceedings. Now, I knew that ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Under what circumstances can the word “be” be used directly without any change? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use the subjunctive mood? 2 examples first: 1.It is announced that the accounting class of the 3rd and 4th hours on the morning of this Wednesday be cancelled ...
2
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1answer
5k views

Causative verb using have/has

I can understand the causative form (quite less frequently, we simply say causal verb) with make and get but when used with have/has, it sometimes makes me think differently. Of course, I can ...
2
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1answer
46k views

“Prefer to do something” vs. “prefer doing something” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive? What's the difference between the two: What materials do they prefer working with? What ...
2
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2answers
7k views

“Ambitious to [infinitive]” vs. “ambitious about [gerund]”

What is the correct preposition to use with ambitious? I am ambitious to achieve success. I am ambitious about achieving success.
2
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1answer
51 views

Identifying parts of sentences with infinitive phrases

To help others is important. In this sentence, 'To help' is the infinitive (being used as noun subject) and 'is' is the verb. What is the object ? 'Others' ? And is 'To help others' an infinitive ...
2
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1answer
149 views

Which should I use, infinitive or participle? [closed]

I found this description in Wikipedia on infinitive. As a modifier of a noun or adjective. This may relate to the meaning of the noun or adjective ("a request to see someone"; "keen to get on"), or ...
2
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1answer
336 views

“even to” and “to even”

Going off this question, where the sole answer put forth a rule of thumb: Grammatical reason: it is considered best for clarity's sake to place the emphasizer ("even," here) closest to the entity ...
2
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1answer
616 views

Gerund or infinitive in : “… but to do that” vs. “… but doing that”

What is correct form in between these sentences: He had no choice but doing that or He had no choice but to do that. When I googled "but doing that" I found 388,000 results, whereas "but to ...
2
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1answer
127 views

Infinitives in compound setence

I have a sentence: In order to quickly search for relevant information among them, it is necessary to structure and to categorize them. Would you use the infinitives twice (to structure and to ...
2
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1answer
156 views

Passive of infinitive objects

I am reading Micheal Swan's English Grammar. There is a point in passive section: We hope to make a profit this year (active) But it cannot be made passive as: *It is hoped to make a profit this ...
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1answer
2k views

Shall: In Present Tense

http://webstersdictionary1828.com/Dictionary/Shall Shall is primarily in the present, and in our mother tongue was followed by a verb in the infinitive. I've been doing some research to figure ...
2
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1answer
242 views

Is `limited to viewing` correct in this context? Your account is `limited to` viewing only the first 100 pictures

As the title says, is limited to correct in that context? Let's say for instance that Facebook offers free and paid account and Facebook only allows free account to view the first 100 pictures of ...
2
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1answer
907 views

Omitting verbs, is it correct?

I wonder if I could omit the second 'visit' in such sentence: You have to visit all the places, which she wants to (visit) Would it be correct? Thanks in advance :)
2
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1answer
355 views

Is there a difference between an adverb and an adjectival complement?

Consider the example: I am happy to wait. In some publications, the function of the infinitive is called 'adverb'. In others, it is 'complement of adjective'. Is there a difference in the naming of ...
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1answer
391 views

He happened + infin

I happened to see... In sentences like this, is the infinitive the object of happen? Can happen be transitive?
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2answers
3k views

{To verb 1 + verb 2} or {to verb 1 + **to** verb 2}?

How to have two "to + verbs"? Is it to verb 1 + verb 2 or to verb 1 + to verb 2? Lead a team to integrate two systems and increase the accuracy of report. Lead a team to integrate two systems and to ...
2
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1answer
253 views

What does the perfect infinitive mean?

I came across a sentence recently: Before I turn 40, I want to have written a book. Could someone explain to me what does it actually mean? I'd rather say: Before I turn 40, I want to write a book. ...
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2answers
198 views

About Infinitive

I know that this sentence is correct: "He is not a man to tell a lie." Is it also correct if I say "He is not a man tell a lie." If it's correct what is the difference between these ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Is it grammatical to say of some potential meaning that it is “able to be said” or “trying to be said”?

A recent commenter on a recent word-search question nominated a term as “an even better word for what is trying to be said.” This seems to me to attribute intention to something—a ...
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3answers
2k views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree with your ...
2
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1answer
598 views

Is the second “to” grammatical in “I plan to help build and then to start”?

I wrote this sentence: I plan to help build a strategic vision for Arabic digital content and then to start implementing that vision. I want to produce value-added information in a specific context ...
2
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1answer
4k views

How can I identify the role of an infinitive in a sentence?

Infinitives may function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs. Since infinitives are derived from verbs, they do express actions or states of being. However, there is some difficulty in identifying the ...
2
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1answer
629 views

Is it customary or grammatical to drop ‘to’ in “I’m not going to go look for it”?

There was a scene a thirty-something wife refuses to go looking for the wedding ring her husband lost in a courtyard when she was asked by her husband over the phone, in the fiction titled “The Lost ...
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2answers
89 views

Infinitives used as imperatives?

There is a passage in The Moonstone (by Wilkie Collins, 1874) which is full of infinitive forms of verbs. ("To xxx"). What I find hard to explain is that despite the infinitives, this passage clearly ...
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0answers
54 views

“hard to distinguish” or “hard to be distinguished”?

Here is a phrase (slightly modified from the original) that I'd like to discuss. A) targeting small structures that are hard to distinguish I have no doubt that this will convey what it means, but ...
2
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1answer
68 views

stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence?

Is there a stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence? Or is it a question of style? For example, It is vital for a viewer of this movie to listen for its main character's underlying position,...
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0answers
53 views

Can you use a 'to' infinitive instead of using 'by ~ing'?

To identify human genes and understand their roles allows researchers to discover the cause of various diseases. To contain the meaning of 'by ~ing' or 'while ~ing', can you use 'to infinite' like in ...
2
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1answer
365 views

Can I omit “to be” in passive infinitive?

For example, It's fine for the streets to be winding and the street network varied. (in this case, to be is repeated in both clauses so it's okay to omit to be in second clause) It's fine for the ...
2
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1answer
856 views

Can you include two to + infinitives in a sentence [closed]

When you're writing a list of actions in the form of infinitive verbs, do you include "to" before each of them? For example, "Ann wants to learn to read and to knit." I tend to think you'd only ...
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1answer
4k views

In order to Verb and (to) Verb [duplicate]

In order to address traffic jam and reduce carbon footprint In order to address traffic jam and to reduce carbon footprint Which one is correct?
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0answers
50 views

'that' + (pro)noun + infinitive: what grammar is behind such construct? [duplicate]

While reading a technical book, I stumbled upon the following sentence: It is important [that all Java programmers be fully versed in, and comfortable with, the traditional approach]. For me, it's ...
2
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2answers
588 views

Why do 'get' and 'have' work similarly in 'get/have sth done" but differently in 'get sb to do sth' and 'have sb do sth'

Why do 'get' and 'have' work similarly in I got/had my car repaired. but differently – that is are not complemented in the same way although they still mean the same – in I got someone to ...
2
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1answer
10k views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is the ...