Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

41 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
3
votes
1answer
110 views

“The soil is too arid to plant seeds.” Is “to plant seeds” correct here?

I feel something's wrong with the part "to plant seeds", whose logical subject should be a person. I wonder if the sentence is right or how to correct it the other way around.
2
votes
2answers
89 views

Infinitives used as imperatives?

There is a passage in The Moonstone (by Wilkie Collins, 1874) which is full of infinitive forms of verbs. ("To xxx"). What I find hard to explain is that despite the infinitives, this passage clearly ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

“hard to distinguish” or “hard to be distinguished”?

Here is a phrase (slightly modified from the original) that I'd like to discuss. A) targeting small structures that are hard to distinguish I have no doubt that this will convey what it means, but ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence?

Is there a stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence? Or is it a question of style? For example, It is vital for a viewer of this movie to listen for its main character's underlying position,...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

Can you use a 'to' infinitive instead of using 'by ~ing'?

To identify human genes and understand their roles allows researchers to discover the cause of various diseases. To contain the meaning of 'by ~ing' or 'while ~ing', can you use 'to infinite' like in ...
2
votes
1answer
364 views

Can I omit “to be” in passive infinitive?

For example, It's fine for the streets to be winding and the street network varied. (in this case, to be is repeated in both clauses so it's okay to omit to be in second clause) It's fine for the ...
2
votes
1answer
284 views

Position of verbals

In the first sentence, We move the infinitive to the end of the sentence and place a prepatory object after verb. But when we use gerund, we keep it after verb as in second sentence . I was wondering ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

A Inquiry About Infinitive-To and Its Role As A Subordinator or An Auxiliary

If you're interested in grammar, as I am, I am sure you have delved into a thought process about infinitive to, and like me, you have probably questioned what it is, or what it could be defined as. My ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Interrogatives followed by an infinitive

I know these sentences work: We don't know where to put the sofa. (where we should put the sofa) No one could tell me how to start the engine. (how I should start the engine) The rules didn't ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Are two (or more) to-infinitives treated as singular?

A friend said to me that two (or more) to-infinitives are treated as singular (whereas gerunds can be treated as plural depending on the situation). Is it true? Or, in this example sentence, which ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Passive or Active (Infinitive construction)

The task is to open the brackets: I don't want these rumours (to spread) around. As far as I can see, both "to spread" and "to be spread" are possible. What sounds more natural to you? Does "around" ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

Infinitive verb as the main verb

I have seen this usage on Twitter and wonder what it exactly means. Is it just an informative exception or a common usage? Thresa May to take her Brexit roadshow to the north-east (https://i.stack....
1
vote
0answers
119 views

omission of infinitive marker: i.e., He'll come, if he wants (to)

To me, these He'll come, if he wants He'll come, if he's able He'll come, if I allow him are simply variants of He'll come, if he wants to He'll come, if he's able to He'll ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

adjective+for someone to do something

I know that we can normally use the combination "adjective+to do smt". He is close-minded to talk to. That topic is very hard to argue on. How about adding "for" to those sentences? He is close-...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Comparing infinitives and nouns

I'm wondering whether it's grammatically correct to compare an infinitive with a noun using 'than'. For example: "Does he like to play in band better than gym?" she asked? I don't hear much usage of ...
1
vote
0answers
67 views

Is “You were going to <noun> and <verb>.” grammatical?

In the song "An English Teacher" from the musical "Bye, Bye Birdie," Rosie sings to Albert You were going to NYU / and become an English teacher. I would parse this as You were (going to NYU) and (...
1
vote
0answers
131 views

Parsing a sentence with a causative verb

I am an ESL teacher trying to help a student prepare for a test that will have a lot of sentence parsing. We are both stumped by the second verb in causative sentences. For example: She asked the ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Is it redundant to add implied words after infinitive (eg “to share” vs “to share together”)

I wanted to write something in a message to my department that essentially says "I am thankful for this home we share"...however I initially thought that I would emphasize the cohesion of the group by ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

What Types Of Infinitives Are These?

Do you want to live to be a hundred? I know him to be an honest man. I assumed him to be a thief. What types of infinitive are these? As we know that these are not the infinitive of purpose. Are ...
1
vote
0answers
176 views

Be + Perfect Infinitive

I was wondering if I could use this construction: The President is to have visited Italy by today I know that if I typed The President was to have + p.part. it would mean he should have but He didn'...
1
vote
0answers
197 views

Infinitive Verbals versus prepositional phrase

I am working through sentence diagrams and continue to have trouble determining when a construction is an infinitive verbal or if it is simply a prepositional phrase. Example 1: "Stephanie likes to ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Can an infinitive noun phrase be used as the subject of a question?

It is fine to say: To get the details is very important But is it OK to say: Is to get the details very important?
1
vote
0answers
314 views

I have a question of whether or not it is correct to begin with “to infinitive” in a sentence

In my country, I learned to-infinitive has three kinds. I am not sure these terminology, so I will introduce usage of . One is usage of noun. For example, it is difficult for you to solve. Another is ...
1
vote
0answers
91 views

Is “to say” in Hamlet's “and by a sleep to say we end” an infinitive or an adverb?

I was trying to identify the word classes of Hamlet's famous monologue "To be or not to be", and I'm really having trouble deciding what word class "to say" in "and by sleep to say we end the ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Ing form as infinitive at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use the ing form as infinitive at the beginning of a sentence? E.g. learning extracurricular Software to improve personal training. This is a sentence I put in brackets in my ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

I made him laugh vs I made him to laugh

Why dowe use a bare infinitive after let, make, bid etc.? And if we use a to infinitive before them as in the second sentence written above, then what does that now mean? I am very, very, very ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

In grammar terminology, what sentence structure terminology is used to describe the infinitive-looking phrase after the verb “told”?

BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The sentences below prove that the infinitive form of verbs as well as the gerund form can be used in the object position of the sentence structure S-V-O. I like toys. (...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

“To be reviewed and approved”

Does the phrase "to be reviewed and approved by [someone]" indicate that the actor must take the specified actions (i.e., review and approve)?
0
votes
1answer
240 views

“For + subj. + to” infinitive to indicate purpose

I would like more information about this type of construction. Good examples escape me at the moment, but it would be something along the lines of: These conditions need to be satisfied for this ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

“doomed to” + noun or infinitive?

I know the phrase "doomed to failure" exists. I also found someone here who suggests that both, "doomed to failure" and "doomed to fail" can be used for a specific situation: "I'm doomed to failure"...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Can I say that the 'to-infinitive which is part of predicative is an object?

The infinitive as object as in "He asked me to come in." & the to-infinitive as part of predicative as in 'The house of Jane was not easy to find' both act as noun. Both of these 'to come & to ...
0
votes
0answers
65 views

“To travel is to live” is this sentence correct?

I got a bottle as a present and it is written "To travel is to live" I supposed that should be written something different but I don't know how to say this in English, somebody tried to say that when ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

“How to we categorize appropriation”

I cannot grasp the sentence structure of this: What incites my curiosity even further is how to we categorize appropriation in the case when Japanese people say that there is nothing offensive ...
0
votes
1answer
396 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
0
votes
1answer
347 views

Likely to be found

Orbitals are the regions of space in which electrons are most likely to be found. According to Cambridge dictionary, "likely" refers to something that will probably happen. I am confused here. Does "...
-1
votes
1answer
53 views

How to use 'fly'?

There is your sky Break your cage You meant for fly Not for staying in a range "You meant for flying" Or "You meant for fly" Which one is correct?
-1
votes
0answers
44 views

Structure with to+infinitive or participle

What's the difference in meaning between these two phrases? It was the beginning of an artistic career devoted to the oneness of art and life. It was the beginning of an artistic career to devote to ...
-1
votes
0answers
152 views

infinitive functions : adverb or direct object?

we were given the following questions by our teacher and the answers didn't make sense. hope you guys can explain. They needed to have a degree in engineering, physics and mathematics. - adverb was ...
-1
votes
2answers
350 views

Why do we call the verb in the first sentence in the infinitive form while we don't in the second one?

http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/infinitive_form.htm The sentences were taken from the link above. I must run every day. I run every day. As far as I know, they both have the verb 'run'. ...
-1
votes
1answer
103 views

The usage of infinitive (supine) in the sentence

Consider this sentence: He carried the taxed grain in large ship in 1863 to pass the water channel with the sea men and officials to leave the daily situation as the record in simply ways like ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

Is this a valid construction using the the perfect infinitive

Is it correct to say " In order to have been". I understand that without context the general meaning may be difficult to interpret, but could this even be used as a valid construction with the ...