Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5
votes
2answers
122 views

Question on what role this infinitive plays in the sentence?

I am going to study. Does "to study" act as an adverb, a direct object, or something else? My gut feeling says adverb. Thanks for your help.
0
votes
1answer
343 views

“I like hear good news”

I'd like to know whether it's common in informal speech to delete the infinitive particle "to" in the construction 'to hear sth.' This video shows an example at 6:36; I've analysed it at 0.5 speed, ...
2
votes
1answer
149 views

Infinitives in compound setence

I have a sentence: In order to quickly search for relevant information among them, it is necessary to structure and to categorize them. Would you use the infinitives twice (to structure and to ...
0
votes
2answers
43k views

Which expression is correct? “I've already started working on it” or “I've already started to work on it” [duplicate]

today i attended an interview. The employer told me that I should know some skills about the job. Today I am going to start to work on those skills. Now, I am writing a "thank you for the interview" ...
0
votes
3answers
601 views

Splitting an Infinitive [closed]

I was watching an episode of Psych today, where they made a grammar joke that referenced a term I hadn't heard before. The quote in question that apparently splits an infinitive is: (Karen Vick) ...
0
votes
1answer
147 views

Gerund vs. infinitive: are both forms acceptable for the following examples?

It is a lesser evil to have x than to have y. Having x is a lesser evil than having y. Which of them are incorrect?
1
vote
0answers
179 views

Be + Perfect Infinitive

I was wondering if I could use this construction: The President is to have visited Italy by today I know that if I typed The President was to have + p.part. it would mean he should have but He didn'...
3
votes
1answer
63 views

What is the role of the “to have the” in the sentence

He's been ordered to have the dog destroyed because it's dangerous but he refuses to comply. What is the role of the "to have the" in the sentence and how it is separated from he's been ordered to ...
1
vote
1answer
766 views

Is “What I'm doing is” followed by an infinitive or gerund form? [closed]

Title says everything. American English please (but if it's different in British English, please point that out as well)
1
vote
0answers
59 views

What is the meaning of “be it”? [duplicate]

Your carbon footprint is the total carbon sum of your actions, be it when you travel, when you shop, when you eat, when you bathe - any action that uses up fossil fuels such as oil, coal or gas. [...
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Does “to” as an infinitive marker require the subject to relate to the following verb?

I've looked at quite a few questions here but I've been unable to figure this out. In the following: She came to bring us food. She is performing the act of "bring." BUT, in this one: Many ...
2
votes
2answers
579 views

Usage Difference between to-infinitive and participle

I came across this question today. Q: the correct expression for blank. The documents ____ immediate attention are on top. 1. Requiring 2. To require I know the answer is ...
0
votes
1answer
655 views

continuous infinitive or bare continuous infinitive [duplicate]

Why is in this sentence used bare continuous infinitive? It is important that the focus of training courses be towards enabling employees to competently perform tasks.
2
votes
1answer
163 views

Passive of infinitive objects

I am reading Micheal Swan's English Grammar. There is a point in passive section: We hope to make a profit this year (active) But it cannot be made passive as: *It is hoped to make a profit this ...
1
vote
0answers
206 views

Infinitive Verbals versus prepositional phrase

I am working through sentence diagrams and continue to have trouble determining when a construction is an infinitive verbal or if it is simply a prepositional phrase. Example 1: "Stephanie likes to ...
103
votes
12answers
12k views

Why does “I was happy to do my homework” work, but “I was tired to do my homework” doesn't?

I'm teaching ESL, and I came across a question from one of my students that I don't know how to answer. Using the form "{subject} {verb} {adjective} {infinitive phrase}" we've been going over ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Can an infinitive noun phrase be used as the subject of a question?

It is fine to say: To get the details is very important But is it OK to say: Is to get the details very important?
1
vote
3answers
458 views

When should I add “to” before an infinitive in a parallelism sentence?

Here is a sentence I wrote: All he can do, as it turns out, is to stay by her side, take her to wherever he goes and hope someday she will wake up. I added to ahead of take... in the first place, ...
0
votes
1answer
133 views

Usage of “to” in the mentioned sentence

The first sentence on this page: https://www.wired.com/2015/02/powerspy-phone-tracking/ says SMARTPHONE USERS MIGHT balk at letting a random app like Candy Crush or Shazam track their every move via ...
2
votes
1answer
947 views

Can you include two to + infinitives in a sentence [closed]

When you're writing a list of actions in the form of infinitive verbs, do you include "to" before each of them? For example, "Ann wants to learn to read and to knit." I tend to think you'd only ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Shall: In Present Tense

http://webstersdictionary1828.com/Dictionary/Shall Shall is primarily in the present, and in our mother tongue was followed by a verb in the infinitive. I've been doing some research to figure ...
-1
votes
1answer
104 views

The usage of infinitive (supine) in the sentence

Consider this sentence: He carried the taxed grain in large ship in 1863 to pass the water channel with the sea men and officials to leave the daily situation as the record in simply ways like ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

In order to Verb and (to) Verb [duplicate]

In order to address traffic jam and reduce carbon footprint In order to address traffic jam and to reduce carbon footprint Which one is correct?
1
vote
2answers
729 views

Infinitive form of helping verb

I had a confusion between Infinitive form of the verb and the base form of the verb. But this LINK explains the difference between infinitive and base form of the verb. Base form: be, have, ...
2
votes
1answer
287 views

Position of verbals

In the first sentence, We move the infinitive to the end of the sentence and place a prepatory object after verb. But when we use gerund, we keep it after verb as in second sentence . I was wondering ...
0
votes
1answer
210 views

Question about a sentence by Graham Swift in “Waterland”

I still have a question about the sentence "whose need of stories is matched only by the need adults have of children to tell stories to" from the novel "Waterland" that was written by Graham Swift. ...
1
vote
0answers
332 views

I have a question of whether or not it is correct to begin with “to infinitive” in a sentence

In my country, I learned to-infinitive has three kinds. I am not sure these terminology, so I will introduce usage of . One is usage of noun. For example, it is difficult for you to solve. Another is ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Use of infinitive form of verb with another verb [duplicate]

As a native speaker, this sounds incorrect to me: The company does not permit to distribute the modified materials. But, I can't explain why it is not so to a non-native speaker. To me, it should ...
1
vote
0answers
92 views

Is “to say” in Hamlet's “and by a sleep to say we end” an infinitive or an adverb?

I was trying to identify the word classes of Hamlet's famous monologue "To be or not to be", and I'm really having trouble deciding what word class "to say" in "and by sleep to say we end the ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Infinitive's Part of Speech in “Scientists have struggled for so many years to find them.”

Is "to find them" an adverbial of purpose or an adverbial of result? In other words, which of the following two sentences is closer to the sentence in the subject line: Scientists have ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

When to use a gerund or an infinitive after “is”?

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive? states a 90% rule, but I'm more interested in the remaining 10%. This British Council page states Sorry, there isn’t a rule. You have to ...
1
vote
3answers
239 views

Infinitive verses present participle

I often come across this type of thing and wondered if anyone could tell me the correct usage. I have a sentence that reads "As you go through various settings, you will have the option to allow ...
3
votes
3answers
200 views

A question regarding the following usage of the perfect infinitive?

In regards to the usage of the perfect infinitive I've been wondering if it can be used simultaneously with verbs of perception by way of expressing your notion or belief involving either a person or ...
1
vote
2answers
653 views

'Expect to' as an expression of excitement?

In a recent test we asked students to write a sentence expressing their excitement at a future activity. We gave an example sentence using 'looking forward to'. One student wrote "I'm expecting to ...
2
votes
1answer
256 views

Is `limited to viewing` correct in this context? Your account is `limited to` viewing only the first 100 pictures

As the title says, is limited to correct in that context? Let's say for instance that Facebook offers free and paid account and Facebook only allows free account to view the first 100 pictures of ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Using too many 'to's in a sentence?

This may be more of a stylistic question than anything else, but I'm hoping for some general rules about using the word 'to' in a sentence and when it might be used too many times. For example, I'm ...
2
votes
1answer
955 views

Omitting verbs, is it correct?

I wonder if I could omit the second 'visit' in such sentence: You have to visit all the places, which she wants to (visit) Would it be correct? Thanks in advance :)
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Can an infinitive be used as an indirect object?

Is it possible to use an infinitive as an indirect object? For example, in the sentence 'I persuaded him to go there,' I guess that 'him' is the direct object and 'to go there' is an indirect object....
0
votes
1answer
550 views

To + verb, bare verb or verb + ing in noun phrases [duplicate]

I've asked this around and I'm RACKING MY BRAIN trying to figure it out. Which one is the correct verb form in the following sentence? The craziest thing I've ever done is go / to go / going ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Infinitive instead of gerund, specifically after 'require' [duplicate]

I use Grammarly Chrome extension to validate my texts in English. And with some sentences I keep seeing the error message "Infinitive instead of gerund". I'm not sure if this is an appropriate error ...
0
votes
1answer
304 views

Difference between using a gerund and using to + verb root

As an objective (or subjective). "Being a teacher" vs "to be a teacher". What is the difference between gerund and 'to' + verb root ? My dream is being a teacher. My dream is to be a teacher.
-1
votes
1answer
44 views

Is this a valid construction using the the perfect infinitive

Is it correct to say " In order to have been". I understand that without context the general meaning may be difficult to interpret, but could this even be used as a valid construction with the ...
3
votes
1answer
113 views

Can an infinitive phrase be equivocal in its function in a sentence?

I have found the following sentence as an example of an infinitive phrase used as an adjective, however, it seems to me that it could also be taken as an adverb of purpose. Jane bought a radio to ...
4
votes
2answers
444 views

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself

I have a bodyguard in order to protect myself. I was told that I cannot have a stative verb in the required condition: I have a bodyguard But I don't understand how "I need to study in order to ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Correct verb patterns for the verb 'recommend'? [duplicate]

Which of the last three verb patterns apply to the verb 'recommend'? I recommend that you wait. (present subjunctive, American usage) I recommend that you should wait. (substitute for present ...
1
vote
1answer
270 views

To do something is something - what use of the infinitive is this?

I teach English and a student of mine recently came out with the following sentence: She thinks that to become a marketing manager is the opportunity she seeks for. I thought this was a curious ...
2
votes
1answer
334 views

Important to learn is this stuff

This song is fun to sing. This pizza is too hot to eat. Is the infinitive there considered a complement of the predicate adjective?
0
votes
1answer
281 views

I want to know usage of infinitive as adverb

for example. she lived to be ninety what does that sentence mean? Is it meaning of "she lived in order to be ninety" or "she lived and just became ninety"? I have learned it as she lived and ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Not sure if this is correct or not: “the ability to be able to”

The sentence: Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them. Is it to be able ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

“It is better to X than to Y” - the structure of a difficult comparative sentence

Take the following sentence: It is better to underestimate your abilities and overestimate your risks than to go in a direction that actually involves more uncertainty than you can justify. For ...