Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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152 views

infinitive functions : adverb or direct object?

we were given the following questions by our teacher and the answers didn't make sense. hope you guys can explain. They needed to have a degree in engineering, physics and mathematics. - adverb was ...
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67 views

Is “You were going to <noun> and <verb>.” grammatical?

In the song "An English Teacher" from the musical "Bye, Bye Birdie," Rosie sings to Albert You were going to NYU / and become an English teacher. I would parse this as You were (going to NYU) and (...
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1answer
42 views

Help straighten OR help straightening

Like it will help straighten your hair OR it will help straightening your hair Which is correct? Thanks,
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2answers
2k views

Make somebody to do something

I know this verb does not take "to" after the direct object. Although, I spot T.L. Short in his "Peirce's Theory of Signs" always inserting "to" in this construction. What happens? Is it some formal-...
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1answer
110 views

“The soil is too arid to plant seeds.” Is “to plant seeds” correct here?

I feel something's wrong with the part "to plant seeds", whose logical subject should be a person. I wonder if the sentence is right or how to correct it the other way around.
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3answers
281 views

base verb or V-ing?

Can anyone tell me why a V-ing is used after the infinitive 'to'? There are four stages on the road to becoming a scientist, and I remember them all. (to become?) There are now a number of routes ...
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2answers
7k views

I would prefer + (to infinitive) + rather than + (bare infinitive) or (to infinitive)?

I've found this during my studies: I would prefer to die in a car crash rather than to die in my sleep. Is this correct? Shouldn't it be: I would prefer to die in a car crash rather than die in ...
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129 views

Parsing a sentence with a causative verb

I am an ESL teacher trying to help a student prepare for a test that will have a lot of sentence parsing. We are both stumped by the second verb in causative sentences. For example: She asked the ...
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1answer
63 views

What is the infinitive form of a possessive adjective?

I want to create flashcards (French <-> English) about idioms like "to put all your eggs in one basket". Those idioms have to be written in the infinitive form but I don't know what do to with ...
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1answer
4k views

What is the difference between “It's sad to see you leave.” and “It's sad seeing you leaving.”?

"It's sad to see you leave." "It's sad seeing you leaving." I know the first one has a infinitive, and the second one a gerund. But I'm not sure about the difference of the meaning. or these two ...
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1answer
60 views

Infinitive as an adjective

Please tell me what sentence is right: 1) There was so much to read; 2) There was so much to be read. Thank you
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3answers
1k views

Difference between “help + [infinitive]” with and without “to”

Englishgrammar.org has an article discussing cases where an infinitive does not use the word "to." One case is with many causative verbs like "make" and "let." I want the water to run *I want ...
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Regarding whether to add a preposition in infinitive phrase served as attributive [duplicate]

The two sentences I encountered when I read grammar book are as follows: I had no place to live in. A good place to eat is the Sichuan restaurant around the corner. Regarding the 1st sentence, the ...
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2answers
644 views

Uses of to-infinitive in passive sentences

First, I would like you to look at these two sentences: 'I used scissors to cut it.' 'I wore glasses to read a book.' And I am going to form passive sentences from the two. 'Scissors were ...
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1answer
5k views

“Try and get some rest” OR “Try to get some rest”? [duplicate]

Which sentence is grammatically correct? Try and get some rest (or) Try to get some rest
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35 views

Is it redundant to add implied words after infinitive (eg “to share” vs “to share together”)

I wanted to write something in a message to my department that essentially says "I am thankful for this home we share"...however I initially thought that I would emphasize the cohesion of the group by ...
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2answers
2k views

What is going on grammatically in the opening line of One Hundred Years of Solitude?

The opening line of One Hundred Years of Solitude in the English translation reads: Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon ...
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1answer
59 views

What does this question ask? What is the meaning of “for the law” in this sentence?

The sentence is: "Is it ever justifiable for the law to treat some people as inferior to others?" Can anyone explain the meaning of this question? I am confused about especially the "for the law" ...
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2answers
1k views

What is the grammar in: “in the year to come”?

Could you please explain to me what grammar is this "…many blessings in the year to come". I mean I'm having difficulty to understand why there is "to" before "come". They teach us here that ...
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1answer
364 views

Can I omit “to be” in passive infinitive?

For example, It's fine for the streets to be winding and the street network varied. (in this case, to be is repeated in both clauses so it's okay to omit to be in second clause) It's fine for the ...
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3answers
596 views

“How to not be seen” vs. “how not to be seen”

I understand the following phrase as follows: how to not be seen – how to avoid being seen altogether how not to be seen – how to avoid outfits or circumstances in which you do not want to be ...
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1answer
148 views

Which should I use, infinitive or participle? [closed]

I found this description in Wikipedia on infinitive. As a modifier of a noun or adjective. This may relate to the meaning of the noun or adjective ("a request to see someone"; "keen to get on"), or ...
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44 views

Revising Split Infinitives [duplicate]

One of my students refuses to split infinitives. His solution is to put the adverb directly before the infinitive, without fail, five times in two pages of writing. Telling him to split the infinitive ...
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2answers
667 views

Gerund? Infinitive? Why, when we talk about jobs, do we say “I have a job taking people on tours” instead of “I have a job to take people on tours”?

I'm teaching English in China. I wanted middle school or younger, but I was put with some great high school kids and they sometimes ask me questions that I don't know how to answer yet. I'm a native ...
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1answer
336 views

“even to” and “to even”

Going off this question, where the sole answer put forth a rule of thumb: Grammatical reason: it is considered best for clarity's sake to place the emphasizer ("even," here) closest to the entity ...
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1answer
2k views

“To discuss” vs “the discussion of”

I was attempting to use "discuss" in a sentence but got marked off for using the infinitive form: "Moreover, the author fails to address Republican views by merely stating that studies estimate “4 ...
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3answers
240 views

Why include “to” when speaking about verbs?

I cannot grasp any semantic difference, in discussions of grammar matters, between quoting full infinitives (with “to”) or bare infinitives (without “to”). Thus I do not understand why the longer form ...
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4answers
9k views

It is very difficult to solve. vs. It is too difficult to solve [closed]

'It is very difficult to solve.' Is this sentence above grammatically correct? Or does it have to be corrected as 'It is too difficult to solve.' ?
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230 views

Infinitive of Purpose or For [duplicate]

Could you please tell me which usage is correct ? 'I need money to start a business' 'I need money for starting a business' Actually the first one sounds more natural to me and also I know for is ...
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1answer
227 views

Is “To [Adverb] [Infinitive]” Still a Valid Infinitive form? [duplicate]

This question is specifically for I work to nearly get success, but the question is also asking in general. I shouldn't use nearly to get because that would detract from from my purpose of working.
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1answer
345 views

Likely to be found

Orbitals are the regions of space in which electrons are most likely to be found. According to Cambridge dictionary, "likely" refers to something that will probably happen. I am confused here. Does "...
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1answer
44 views

Making “Get” Have No Implied Time Period (AKA No Tense)

I want to make get have no implied time period. Or if that's not possible, to negate its implied time period (probably with always) I want to make an affirmation of mine say "I always work to [the ...
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2answers
350 views

Why do we call the verb in the first sentence in the infinitive form while we don't in the second one?

http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/infinitive_form.htm The sentences were taken from the link above. I must run every day. I run every day. As far as I know, they both have the verb 'run'. ...
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1answer
58 views

Articles' titles like “Facebook to buy Whatsapp” [duplicate]

I am new here. I am a Brazilian learning english and I'd like to understand these articles' titles: Examples: Bethesda to release Dishonored 2 Facebook to buy Whatsapp Donald Trump to build solar ...
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56 views

What Types Of Infinitives Are These?

Do you want to live to be a hundred? I know him to be an honest man. I assumed him to be a thief. What types of infinitive are these? As we know that these are not the infinitive of purpose. Are ...
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263 views

Infinitive adverbial phrase [closed]

Can an infinitive adverbial phrase only ask 'why' about the adverb? I understand that an infinitive can be used as an adverb. I can easily determine how it may ask the 'why' question of the verb; for ...
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2answers
2k views

“Wish” in the Passive [closed]

If we make the subordinate clause in "I wish he were here" nonfinite we get "I wish him to be here", right? Can we then change the voice? What I mean is can "He is wished to be here" be grammatical ...
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1answer
1k views

“can't do anything except eating” vs. “can't do anything except eat”

My dog is so lazy. It can't do anything except eating food. My dog is so lazy. It can't do anything except eat food. Which one is right? We asked this question in two different forums but we ...
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2answers
588 views

Pseudo-cleft sentences with the verbs of perception

I know we must use bare infinitives with these verbs in the Active. e.g. I saw a lady cross the street. There are other verbs with which we are supposed to use a bare infinitive in the Active. e.g. ...
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35 views

Is it okay to omit “to be” when using adverbs and infinitives? [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? The room needs cleaned. The room needs cleaning. The room needs to be cleaned.
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8answers
13k views

Can 'in which to' and 'with which to' be replaced by just 'to' in the following sentences?

All of these factors make them an ideal population in which to test these competing hypotheses about how language is learned. in which to? These children began learning English at an older ...
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1answer
77 views

Use of “that” and the verb in infinitive in this sentence [closed]

I have a doubt regarding the use of "that" in the following sentence. I also do not know the tense or kind of sentence is this. "To verify that the following names are shown in this list:"
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1answer
677 views

Subject-control verbs

I have been studying Raising and Controlling, but it seems quite hard to understand its function and uses. I would like any of you to analyze this explanation and tell me whether I got it correct or ...
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2answers
298 views

How to help them succeed [duplicate]

why the following question is-> How to help them succeed? instead of How to help them TO succeed?
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1answer
410 views

infinitive phrase function question

Macron beat far-right candidate Marine Le Pen to become France's youngest-ever president. in this sentence I am confused with its function, to become. Is it used as an adverb? adjective? noun? can ...
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2answers
410 views

How do you assign Case to sentences with an infinitival clause?

Look at this example: For the butler to attack the robber would be surprising. Here, the butler and the robber are assigned accusative case. Is 'for' assigning case to the butler and 'to attack' ...
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1answer
613 views

Gerund or infinitive in : “… but to do that” vs. “… but doing that”

What is correct form in between these sentences: He had no choice but doing that or He had no choice but to do that. When I googled "but doing that" I found 388,000 results, whereas "but to ...
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2answers
112 views

What sentences say “for [infinitive]”?

I have the following phrase, or something like it: That's for to learn grammar. I guess it's a common kind of construction, if confusing / malformed. Could I read it as missing an elided e.g. name? ...
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1answer
209 views

“I was struggling to establish and [to] follow” [closed]

I am learning English. I found this sentence in a book. At the time, I was struggling to establish myself as a writer and to follow my path... Is it grammatically correct to use the to-infinitive ...
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2answers
122 views

Question on what role this infinitive plays in the sentence?

I am going to study. Does "to study" act as an adverb, a direct object, or something else? My gut feeling says adverb. Thanks for your help.