Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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1answer
39 views

I would have gone travelling or I would have gone to travel?

Why do we say "I would have gone travelling" instead of "I would have gone to travel"? Because "would" is a modal verb, we usually say that it is followed by an ...
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2answers
54 views

You can have 'it is important to do X'; can you have 'it is urgent to do X'?

I'm proofreading an academic text, and I came across 'It is urgent to develop new theories for...' Intuitively this use of 'urgent' seems non-standard to me, and while I've resolved (or I suppose ...
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27 views

“To …, to …, and to …” multiple to-infinitives [duplicate]

Usually, I just use one "to", in sentences like "To address this problem and share our ideas with others, we would like to ...". But I also see people use multiple "to"s, ...
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2answers
4k views

Make somebody to do something

I know this verb does not take "to" after the direct object. Although, I spot T.L. Short in his "Peirce's Theory of Signs" always inserting "to" in this construction. What happens? Is it some formal-...
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2answers
2k views

Noun+ infinitive + verb structure

In my grammar book I've got a sentence The woman to talk to is over there. and this is the only example of that type. That makes me believe I can say things like: The packages to deal with will ...
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1answer
31 views

Infinitives in news titles

I have a question on the usage of infinitives in news titles. While infinitives are seemingly used to indicate that something will be happening in the near future in news headlines (as discussed in ...
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45 views

Some tips to help with homesickness

Some tips to help with homesickness. Q1) Is the clause in bold a relative-infinitival? (some tips that can help with homesickness) Q2) Can I replace the to-infinitive with for+ving? (Some tips for ...
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Bare Infinitive after certain verbs

"I dare you go inside" "I will tell him go" I have learned from my grammar book that after certain verbs such as dare, need, let, will, would, shall etc, the infinite is used ...
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2answers
134 views

Need help breaking down this sentence: “I took action to make my plan come to fruition.”

So far I have "to make my plan come to fruition" as a subordinate clause, but I'm having trouble defining its components. Is "come to fruition" modifying "plan"? How is the infinitive functioning here?...
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4answers
7k views

How do I identify “infinitive clauses/phrases” and “subjects”?

In sentences such as the following, there is (as I understand it) an infinitive clause and an infinitive phrase. Which part is the infinitive clause and which part is the infinitive phrase? And what ...
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2answers
90 views

Verbs after adjectives, gerund or infinitive?

What's the difference between these sentences? Ted was surprised to see his computer shutting down. Ted was surprised seeing his computer shutting down. It was nice to talk with you. It was nice ...
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3answers
45 views

Active perfect infinitive

I was happy to have finished everything early I was watching a video on active and passive infinitive and this example was in the video. I don't understand why the present perfect is used "to ...
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2answers
42 views

In the following sentence, the parallel construction of the infinitives “to acknowledge” and “to accept” have, at least temporarily, befuddled me

To acknowledge the equality of black folks would also, so it was believed, accept a lowered status for rural whites. OR To acknowledge the equality of black folks would be also, so it was believed, ...
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1answer
961 views

Usage of “to find out” [closed]

Your father climbed to some rough rocks near the coast to find out that under the rocks, our friend Lake lies severely wounded. Is this usage of "to find something by chance (as a result of climbing)"...
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3answers
297 views

Can “may” be an infinitive

I was reading this article http://www.organics.org/8-beers-that-you-should-stop-drinking-immediately/ when I saw Propylene Glycol is controversial, and is said to may be potentially harmful to ...
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1answer
47 views

Temporal Participial Phrases

He lay staring into the sky. He came running towards me. He arrived finding nobody there. I have read this by John Lawler but am struggling to put these into one of the five categories he mentioned. ...
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2answers
143 views

Infinitives used as imperatives?

There is a passage in The Moonstone (by Wilkie Collins, 1874) which is full of infinitive forms of verbs. ("To xxx"). What I find hard to explain is that despite the infinitives, this passage clearly ...
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35 views

“Not to watch” vs “Not to have watched” as subject of a sentence [duplicate]

E.g. 1 Not to watch Kobe Bryant's matches when he was alive is my biggest regret. £.g. 2 Not to have watched Kobe Bryant's matches when he was alive is my biggest regret. Am I right that e.g. 1 is not ...
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2answers
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Why can't to-infinitive be used as subject in “Not to learn French is my biggest regret.”?

E.g. 1 "Not learning French is my biggest regret." E.g. 2 "Not to learn French is my biggest regret." I know that e.g. 1 is correct and e.g. 2 is wrong, but what is the grammar ...
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0answers
20 views

“the right of doing“ or ” the right to do"?

A sentence from an ACT English test: The court agreed with Kevin that a person’s right to wear clothing of his or her own choosing is, in fact, protected by the Fourteenth Amendment. Is it correct to ...
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4answers
17k views

“Feel committed to [gerund/infinitive]”

Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow ...
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52 views

Choosing the correct sentence [duplicate]

Which one of these sounds correct (American English)? Is there a better way of saying this? I was not sober enough for you not to notice I'd been drinking. I was not sober enough for you to not ...
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1answer
110 views

How can infinitives, participles, gerunds.. act?

I've seen infinitives function in a few different ways. But in which ways can they function? I've seen infinitives function as direct objects, subjects, and a couple other ways, but how else can they ...
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Re: Subject + verb (“intended”) + infinitive phrase. Could the phrase function as an adverb (vs. direct object)?

First, to save time and effort, I do understand simple explanations such as this (owl.purdue.edu): We intended to leave early. The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of the verb ...
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Usage of “be” infinitive form with no modal verb

Could someone please explain why the verb "be" in the sentence below is in infinitive form? I was confused as there is no modal verb preceding the "be". Is it some sort of technique used in literature ...
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Historically, why is “to” added to the start of every verb? E.g. “to go” “to run”? Why don't we just say “I want run.” “I need go.”?

Historically, why is "to" added to the start of every verb? E.g. "to go" "to run"? Why don't we just say "I want run." "I need go." ? I'm not sure how to make a Google search about this so I came to ...
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Is the verb have in the infinitive “to have breakfast” an auxiliary verb?

Is the verb "have" in the infinitive above an auxiliary smilar to the auxiliary verb "have" used to form the perfect tense?
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1answer
45 views

should I use “maintain” or “maintaining”?

In the sentence below: Whether it is of more importance to maintain old friends for a person than it is to make new friends. Is it correct to use "maintain" as considering "maintain" is part of the ...
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2answers
70 views

Can you prove that phrase “it's important that you to remove” is grammatically incorrect?

I found several times in books the structure with that-clause, where they put the infinitive with the particle "to" after "that". For example, from Advanced Apple Debugging & Reverse Engineering ...
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2answers
366 views

“For + subj. + to” infinitive to indicate purpose

I would like more information about this type of construction. Good examples escape me at the moment, but it would be something along the lines of: These conditions need to be satisfied for this ...
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0answers
64 views

Can infinitives act as nouns, adverbs, and adjectives?

I've seen from multiple sources that infinitives can act as an adjective, adverb, and a noun. However, there are a few examples where I'm unnsure on why they would act like that. In this example, "...
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3answers
156 views

To use a participle or an infinitive? That's the question

Would native speakers use "to harm" in this one? Thanks. The elephant king agreed. He ordered that the elephants stop stepping on a single mouse. From then on, the elephants paid attention and ...
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24 views

Is it ok to write coworking in formal english? also it is correct the way I am using the semicolon?

Please read the following paragraph and tell me if needs some improvement, also if I am using correctly the semicolon: -Coworking with local authorities for finding the best response to attend ...
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40 views

“It's to help you run and to allow you to express yourself” OR “It's to help you run and allow you to express yourself”

Is the repeated "to" in "to allow" or full infinitive necessary in the first sentence? Which sentence is correct or more correct? Could anyone tell me what grammar rule/structure I'm asking about here?...
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27 views

Being, to be,have been, having been

Am I getting a right meaning of these sentences? I'm happy to be here (right now happy here) I'm happy being here (happy here right now but in continuous form) I'm happy to have been here (happy ...
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2answers
49 views

reduced causal adverbial clauses in the second part of a sentence

I should acknowledge that I asked this question in learner's site but I haven't got any helpful response; furthermore, I hold that this is a complex grammatical matter, so that is why I'm repeating ...
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50 views

Using being in the middle of sentences [duplicate]

I am confused about using 'being' in the middle of the sentences. For example I saw in an article in which 'being' was used like this: However, the evidence points to placebo effects being more ...
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1answer
45 views

Can infinitive be moved in a “It is … that” sentence?

For example, He planned to go to Rome to study Italian. → It was to go to Rome to study Italian that he planned.
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1answer
46 views

But, Except, than + Infinitive with 'to' or without 'to'?

I have read that after 'but', 'except', 'than', bare Infinitive (i.e., Infinitive without 'to') is used. But I am confused which one is correct: (1) We want nothing but to be free. OR, We want ...
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29 views

Non-finite clause vs phrase

We know that a clause is a sentence which is a part of a sentence. So, a clause is itself a sentence having a subject and a predicate, but a phrase is just a group of words. To tell you the truth,I ...
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34 views

Continuous infiniti

I can’t remember seeing the same man as devoted to anything as he is to serving you. When to use to +verb ing form ?
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1answer
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Passive or Active (Infinitive construction)

The task is to open the brackets: I don't want these rumours (to spread) around. As far as I can see, both "to spread" and "to be spread" are possible. What sounds more natural to you? Does "around" ...
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1answer
4k views

When to use a gerund or an infinitive after “is”?

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive? states a 90% rule, but I'm more interested in the remaining 10%. This British Council page states Sorry, there isn’t a rule. You have to learn ...
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1answer
148 views

stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence?

Is there a stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence? Or is it a question of style? For example, It is vital for a viewer of this movie to listen for its main character's underlying position,...
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1answer
53 views

Noun + Verb + ing, what grammar structure is it?

I saw in my book this sentence: Arctic animals are now in danger because of ice melting due to global warming. I am wondering what type of grammar structure ice melting and global warming is? Is ...
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27 views

'It is adj to V' 's to -infinitive

It is said that he was murdered. /It is nice to meet someone. /She is difficult to persuade. About 'to meet someone'. Do Americans read it the same as 'that he was murdered', which is a Real Subject, ...
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What is this mood and tense of “I have to agree?”

A non-native English speaker posted a comment: "I've to agree." At first, I thought it was a typo, but then realised the expansion "I have to agree" is (seems?) correct. So why is "I've to agree" ...
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1answer
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Can I say that the 'to-infinitive which is part of predicative is an object?

The infinitive as object as in "He asked me to come in." & the to-infinitive as part of predicative as in 'The house of Jane was not easy to find' both act as noun. Both of these 'to come & to ...
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16 views

To feeling energized or to feel energized

Here is the thing I saw this phrase “he realized how important exercise is to feeling energized” I thought that we must use simple form of a ver as in feel after to And if it is a noun then why is the ...
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5answers
23k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?

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