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Questions tagged [infinitives]

Questions about verbs in their basic (unmarked) forms, such as “be”, “do”, “have”, or “sit”, sometimes introduced by the particle “to” and other times used by itself.

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have had problem [migrated]

Police claimed to have had send the file. As have-had is used to connect past with present then how this sentence make any sense??
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1answer
157 views

“For + subj. + to” infinitive to indicate purpose

I would like more information about this type of construction. Good examples escape me at the moment, but it would be something along the lines of: These conditions need to be satisfied for this ...
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What do you call 'be-to' constructions and are they acceptable English?

Consider the following examples: You have to be really patient if you are to go shopping in the afternoon. It must be active if it is to record the film. What is the construction in bold ...
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depend as predicate in infinitive clause

I'm confused by the following sentence: To understand electricity depends on a knowledge of atoms It seems to me that it is incorrect, however, I couldn't find any rule to support it. My ...
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1answer
58 views

“doomed to” + noun or infinitive?

I know the phrase "doomed to failure" exists. I also found someone here who suggests that both, "doomed to failure" and "doomed to fail" can be used for a specific situation: "I'm doomed to failure"...
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2answers
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Expect +to VS expect + ing

I know that expect is used this way: I expect you to do that. But I have also seen examples like with verb in its "ing" form: What to expect working at... I will expect you doing (does not ...
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1answer
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Use of the infinitive, always use 'to'?

Which is the correct use: Thanks for the opportunity of being here? or Thanks for the opportunity to be here? The idea was to use the verb in infinitive.
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2answers
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Infinitives used as imperatives?

There is a passage in The Moonstone (by Wilkie Collins, 1874) which is full of infinitive forms of verbs. ("To xxx"). What I find hard to explain is that despite the infinitives, this passage clearly ...
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“Regarded as” vs “regarded to be”

I have come across this sentence: Kashmir is regarded to be the heaven on earth. Is there a difference between that and Kashmir is regarded as the heaven on earth.
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Passive or Active (Infinitive construction)

The task is to open the brackets: I don't want these rumours (to spread) around. As far as I can see, both "to spread" and "to be spread" are possible. What sounds more natural to you? Does "around" ...
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1answer
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stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence?

Is there a stated rule on use of infinitives in a sequence? Or is it a question of style? For example, It is vital for a viewer of this movie to listen for its main character's underlying position,...
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1answer
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“To be reviewed and approved”

Does the phrase "to be reviewed and approved by [someone]" indicate that the actor must take the specified actions (i.e., review and approve)?
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1answer
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Can I say that the 'to-infinitive which is part of predicative is an object?

The infinitive as object as in "He asked me to come in." & the to-infinitive as part of predicative as in 'The house of Jane was not easy to find' both act as noun. Both of these 'to come & to ...
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1answer
343 views

Can I omit “to be” in passive infinitive?

For example, It's fine for the streets to be winding and the street network varied. (in this case, to be is repeated in both clauses so it's okay to omit to be in second clause) It's fine for the ...
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the first trial <stemming/to stem> from… vs. the first person to climb

Here are excerpts from different American news articles: a. Mr. Manafort’s case is separate from the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and any ties to the Trump campaign,...
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What is the correct way to use to-infitives?

This topic often confuses me. Sometimes I am not even able to understand the meaning of a sentence. For instance, the sentence: "White to move". You can hear it in chess, it means that the player ...
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3answers
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When should I add “to” before an infinitive in a parallelism sentence?

Here is a sentence I wrote: All he can do, as it turns out, is to stay by her side, take her to wherever he goes and hope someday she will wake up. I added to ahead of take... in the first place, ...
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1answer
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“How to we categorize appropriation”

I cannot grasp the sentence structure of this: What incites my curiosity even further is how to we categorize appropriation in the case when Japanese people say that there is nothing offensive ...
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Interrogatives followed by an infinitive

I know these sentences work: We don't know where to put the sofa. (where we should put the sofa) No one could tell me how to start the engine. (how I should start the engine) The rules didn't ...
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“hard to distinguish” or “hard to be distinguished”?

Here is a phrase (slightly modified from the original) that I'd like to discuss. A) targeting small structures that are hard to distinguish I have no doubt that this will convey what it means, but ...
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1answer
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“No one is born hating…” vs. “No one is born to hate…”

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, ...
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1answer
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Can an adverb clause modify an infinitive?

The title is pretty self explanatory, in the sentence: It is difficult to travel through the huge expanse of parched sands in the Sahara Desert, where oases are plentiful but distant from each other....
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1answer
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Infinitive problem

1)He gave me a pen to write with. 2)He gave me money to spend. Why spend is not taking preposition as it is done in first example. Kindly help me.
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1answer
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“even to” and “to even”

Going off this question, where the sole answer put forth a rule of thumb: Grammatical reason: it is considered best for clarity's sake to place the emphasizer ("even," here) closest to the entity ...
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Are two (or more) to-infinitives treated as singular?

A friend said to me that two (or more) to-infinitives are treated as singular (whereas gerunds can be treated as plural depending on the situation). Is it true? Or, in this example sentence, which ...
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2answers
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Usage Difference between to-infinitive and participle

I came across this question today. Q: the correct expression for blank. The documents ____ immediate attention are on top. 1. Requiring 2. To require I know the answer is ...
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Where should “efficiently” go? “…to use ___ the money we collected ___.”

I need to answer a business-related e-mail. Which one is correct grammatically? We request your approval to use efficiently the money we collected. We request your approval to use the money we ...
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Hello, which one is correct grammatically? [closed]

Please share your offers with me to evaluate. Please share your offers to evaluate with me. Please share with me to evaluate your offers.
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1answer
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Is the infinitive form of verb a true verb?

My question is just as mentioned in the title of this post: Would you call an infinitive verb a true verb? I can't find any direct mention of it anywhere on the web. The CMoS (2010) catalogs ...
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2answers
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“He is said to have known peo­ple” vs “He is said to know peo­ple”? [closed]

I came aross a ques­tion like this: As a pub­lic re­la­tions of­fi­cer, he is said ________ some very in­flu­en­tial peo­ple. to know to have known There are two avail­able an­swers ...
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6answers
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Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
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1answer
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Identifying parts of sentences with infinitive phrases

To help others is important. In this sentence, 'To help' is the infinitive (being used as noun subject) and 'is' is the verb. What is the object ? 'Others' ? And is 'To help others' an infinitive ...
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1answer
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Do I need a “to” for a second infinitive in a sentence?

It was common practice to first test and execute a program's source code by hand before using a computer. It was common practice to first test and to execute a program's source code by hand ...
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{To verb 1 + verb 2} or {to verb 1 + **to** verb 2}?

How to have two "to + verbs"? Is it to verb 1 + verb 2 or to verb 1 + to verb 2? Lead a team to integrate two systems and increase the accuracy of report. Lead a team to integrate two systems and to ...
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What is the difference between “so to do” and “to do so”

I believe that both are correct. I.e. I have got the Christmas Eve off this year but my partner has failed so to do. is equivalent to I have got the Christmas Eve off this year but my partner ...
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Did prescriptivists make up pied-piping in relative infinitive constructions?

A quick Internet search suggests that pied-piping in relative clauses was a natural feature of English even though it is loved by prescriptivists; it existed in older stages of the language, and it ...
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“To start” or “to starting” [duplicate]

While I was attempting online ISL test, where I got the following MCQ: Chen's looking forward ______ his job next week. a) to starting b) to start c) starting d) in starting ...
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to display/show vs to be displayed/shown

The user can choose which elements to display/show The user can choose which elements to be displayed/shown Which sentence is more correct? Is there any difference when using show or display.
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I would prefer + (to infinitive) + rather than + (bare infinitive) or (to infinitive)?

I've found this during my studies: I would prefer to die in a car crash rather than to die in my sleep. Is this correct? Shouldn't it be: I would prefer to die in a car crash rather than die in ...
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Is the sentence “We see this problem be unsolvable.” grammatically correct? [closed]

This is supposed to be the correct answer to one of the exercises from a B2 textbook written by a non-native author. It struck me as odd, but my teacher (also a non-native speaker) told me that such ...
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1answer
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Gerund or infinitive and WHY

WHY is this sentence incorrect? "All that they can do is preparing as much as they can." I know it should be "All they can do is (to) prepare as much as they can." But, for the life of me I can't ...
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1answer
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“not be permitted access” vs. “not be permitted to access”

I was wondering is it right to say something this way: You will not be "permitted access" to the work you produce. Isn't it better to say it this way? You will not be permitted to access to the ...
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1answer
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' I went to place that I wanted to go to'

' I went to place that I wanted to go to' I've just read the sentence above from some test papers, and it looked really awkward. I've already heard "I went to the place where I wanted to go" sounds ...
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“Heard me [infinitive]” vs. “heard me [present participle]”

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At ...
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Help + Noun + Gerund or Infinitive

Help my sister peel oranges. Help my sister to peel oranges. Help my sister peeling oranges. Help my sister with peeling oranges. Which of the above is/are correct, and why are the others incorrect?
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Can you use a 'to' infinitive instead of using 'by ~ing'?

To identify human genes and understand their roles allows researchers to discover the cause of various diseases. To contain the meaning of 'by ~ing' or 'while ~ing', can you use 'to infinite' like in ...
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Is “Why to… …” grammatical?

From Google Support: Why to use page-level permissions Page-level permissions allow you to.. Is the sentence "Why to use page-level permissions" grammatical?
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Pseudo-cleft sentences with the verbs of perception

I know we must use bare infinitives with these verbs in the Active. e.g. I saw a lady cross the street. There are other verbs with which we are supposed to use a bare infinitive in the Active. e.g. ...
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Is 'I would rather…' without an infinitive immediately following it correct?

Consider: I would rather the walls remain painted in a neutral tint. Is this proper use of 'I would rather..', without an infinitive immediately following it? EDIT This suggests that 'I would ...
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Infinitive verb as the main verb

I have seen this usage on Twitter and wonder what it exactly means. Is it just an informative exception or a common usage? Thresa May to take her Brexit roadshow to the north-east (https://i.stack....