Questions tagged [infinitive-vs-gerund]

Questions about the differences between "gerunds", formed with *-ing*, and infinitives, formed with *to*.

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Time to infinitive or time for gerund

Please consider the following constructions: 1. It's time to launch it 2. It's time for launching it 3. It's time for being taught this lesson 4. It's time to be taught this lesson Which one(s) is/are ...
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19 views

Word form after MEAN

Help me with this question, please. I know that if we use mean+gerund it means having a result (can be replaced with 'involve') as in Working from home means being able to keep work-life balance. If ...
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3answers
73 views

What is the difference between using gerunds vs. infinitives as the subject of a sentence?

For example: What is the difference in saying "To err is human" vs. "Making mistakes is an intergal part of the human condition?" In our textbook "Speak Out C1" the author explains that it is more ...
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2answers
128 views

‘Drive somebody to’: Why with infinitive?

We use ‘look forward to + gerund’. According to Cambridge the use of gerund is due to the fact that ‘to’ is a preposition when following ‘look forward’ (as opposed to an infinitive marker). At the ...
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92 views

health experts foresee/predict the novel coronavirus spreading in the U.S

One of the top officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Americans on Tuesday that health experts foresee the novel coronavirus that has killed thousands spreading in the ...
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20 views

Difference in meaning between gerund and infinitive [duplicate]

The whole class was working hard preparing for the exam. The whole class was working hard to prepare for the exam. What are the differences between these two sentences?
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28 views

Gerund versus infinitive [duplicate]

I wonder if someone could offer feedback about the use and meaning difference between the use of infinitive and gerund Being an artist is admitting you are lost and not wanting to be found. Being an ...
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1answer
37 views

When to use verb, base verb or gerund [closed]

Hello i have question help me please The children were so frightened they dared not [?]. => Moving / to move / move ? Why is the answer "Move" without "to" ? I have searched and found a site which ...
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2answers
344 views

Is there a difference between “started to go” and “started going”? [duplicate]

Is there a meaning difference between started to go and started going in this example sentence? "...", he said and started to go/going away.
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1answer
62 views

Go shopping vs for shopping [closed]

Yesterday I was teaching my student about the verb shop. I told him that we use "go" with "shop" to mean to go and buy things. e. g. 1) You are going shopping. 2) You were going shopping. ...
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36 views

See somebody do/doing something [duplicate]

Consider these two variations: Every morning, tourists can see soldiers raise the national flag in the square. Every morning, tourists can see soldiers raising the national flag in the square. What ...
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1answer
141 views

When the adjective 'suited' is followed by a verb, should this verb be in the infinitive or in the -ing form?

Here are some example sentences from different dictionaries. With her qualifications and experience, she would seem to be ideally suited to/for the job. (Cambridge online dictionary) This was ...
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22 views

Being sensitive vs To be sensitive

Being sensitive to others when taking part in a general discussion is a useful quality to have. vs To be sensitive to others when taking part in a general discussion is a useful quality to have. I ...
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1answer
61 views

'To solve' versus 'To solving'

Trying to understand what seems to be a very subtle difference in written and spoken English. Recently, I've seen articles that use 'to + gerund' and 'to + infinitive' in the exact same situations, ...
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59 views

Is this tutorial using “to [verb]-ing” the right way? When should I just use “to [verb]”? [duplicate]

That tutorial says Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) is an approach to analyzing datasets to summarize their main characteristics. It is used to understand data, get some context regarding it, ...
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2answers
69 views

What are the correct words I have to insert here? (Verb patterns) [closed]

I have to complete this sentence with verb patterns. I think that my answer is correct but the checker does not think the same. Your hair needs -------------- . It looks a right mess! (CUT) I ...
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3answers
110 views

Allow X: What’s the difference between “for the sharing of X” and “to share X”? Do they mean the same thing?

What is the difference between these two: Presentation events allow for the sharing of knowledge. Presentation events allow to share knowledge. Do they share the exact same meaning?
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“I like watching” vs “I like to watch” What's the difference?

Which of the two possibilities would native speakers more likely say when they watch a football (soccer or American) match from the comfort of their home? What sport do you watch most on television?...
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1answer
18 views

“… assisting emerging countries meet their development goals…” vs “… assisting emerging countries in meeting their development goals…”

Her role included assisting emerging countries meet their development goals through active engagement with senior level representation from both the public and private sectors. Her role included ...
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1answer
71 views

being usages dilemma

I've read in BBC that we use use "being" as a verb-ing. BBC has listed two kinds of usage; what I want to learn about here is the "preposition + verb-ing" usage. It has been said that "being + past ...
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1answer
53 views

Which of the following sentences is correct ; basically I don't understand where to use gerund and where infinitive, and why

It is snowing; will you like to go skiing on Saturday or Sunday? It is snowing ; will you like to go skii on Saturday or Sunday? (plz reason the answer in simple and discernible way)
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23 views

To smoke vs Smoking at the beginning of the sentence [duplicate]

I have been taught that we can use either of "to INF" or "Verb-ing" at the beginning of the sentence as a subject, which leads me to a point of confusion. Here is my confusion: A: To smoke is ...
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1answer
104 views

Even though she is angry, you should try _______ (talk) to her [closed]

Even though she is angry, you should try _______ (talk) to her In the question above I need to decide whether I should use talking, the gerund-participle, or to talk, a to-infinitive. I’m confused ...
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18 views

Is it correct to use gerund after “want” + obj? [duplicate]

I've been watching Friends series lately and came across the line "I don't want Emma going to the playground". I wonder whether it is correct, and if yes, then why. Thanks)
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38 views

“Instead of ʏᴏᴜʀ calling” vs “Instead of ʏᴏᴜ calling” [duplicate]

Which is better: Instead of your calling, maybe I should do it. Instead of you calling, maybe I should do it. I feel like the first one is the better choice here because instead of needs a gerund, ...
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1answer
372 views

“I know him ʙᴇɪɴɢ honest” vs “I know him ᴛᴏ ʙᴇ honest”

The intended original sentence before conversion is: I know that he is an honest man. I want to know about these two possible reformulated versions of that sentence that replace the original’s ...
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22 views

Use of the infinitive, always use 'to'?

Which is the correct use: Thanks for the opportunity of being here? or Thanks for the opportunity to be here? The idea was to use the verb in infinitive.
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1answer
387 views

Gerund vs infinitive: ‘suggested to me {to get/getting}’ [closed]

Can I know which one is correct. I am confused about when to use gerund/infinitive in a sentence. My brother suggested to me to get a job in bank My brother suggested to me getting a job in bank. ...
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2answers
78 views

“It is” as the beginning of paragraphs

Is it encouraged or discouraged to use "IT IS" at the very beginning of a paragraph in formal writing English?. For instance: It is often argued that study art in school should be mandatory, since ...
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1answer
47 views

“It is an advantage learning a foreign language”. -> It is an advantage to learn…? (infinitive or -ing)

I've come across the following sentence in an article which provides businessmen with advice on how to improve their career prospects. "It is an advantage learning a foreign language." I think the ...
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2answers
351 views

Does the verb “ban” take a gerund or infinitive as its complement? [closed]

Which one below is correct while using the verb ban? Plastic bottle using was banned by government in the country. Government banned to use plastic bottle in the country. Plastic bottle was banned ...
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2answers
484 views

Usage of infinitive or gerund

For him to sail back is unthinkable For him sailing back is unthinkable. Why is the second sentence considered as wrong? Can the first sentence be paraphrased as (1) It is unthinkable that he could ...
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1answer
116 views

Gerund, to-infinitive or bare infinitive?

Which of the following three constructions is more common in everyday speech? Nothing gives me greater pleasure than kissing my girlfriend. Nothing gives me greater pleasure than to kiss my ...
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1answer
87 views

imperative to -ing [duplicate]

Which one is right? the degree is imperative to consolidating my grasp on concepts and keeping me abreast of upcoming upgrades the degree is imperative to consolidate my grasp on concepts and keep me ...
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1answer
86 views

Gerund or Infinitives?

How can I grammatically explain gerund "seeking" in this sentence? Can I use "to seek" instead? I am Sharron Biggs, CEO and founder of BiggsGraphics. I recently came across your advertisement ...
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1answer
257 views

“doomed to” + noun or infinitive?

I know the phrase "doomed to failure" exists. I also found someone here who suggests that both, "doomed to failure" and "doomed to fail" can be used for a specific situation: "I'm doomed to failure"...
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1k views

This quick note is to

Which one would you consider correct: This quick note is to just inform you that... Or This is a quick note to just inform you that... Obviously, the second one is widely used, but I don't know ...
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1answer
39 views

Can the mentioned verb be in a bare infinitive form?

However, rather than undermine its epistemic value, the intentional character of testimony is arguably essential to this value. Shouldn't it be "undermining" or "undermine"? As it is after "than", ...
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308 views

Using gerund at the beginning of bullet points: What is more common, better or correct?

Is it correct or common to use the gerund at the beginning of bullet points? Which of the following examples is more common, better or correct? What are the pros and cons? Can I use the gerund? ...
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1answer
501 views

“believe someone to do something” - (why) is it wrong?

Edit: I added a comment to address the duplicate issue. I had an issue with English grammar a few weeks ago, that is still haunting me, and I assume it to be related to mixing up grammars. I ...
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1answer
667 views

Verbs changing from gerund to infinitive

Some verbs such as advise, recommend, permit, allow, require, forbid are used in sentences either gerund or infinitive. For instance, The plumber recommended buying a new water heater. The ...
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1answer
481 views

the verb “shock” + participle phrase

I found a question asking: Upon leaving, we were shocked to discover/discovering that a mandatory tip of 15 percent was added to our bill. the answer is "to discover" to explain the reason why they ...
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1answer
1k views

Cases that accept both “to” + infinitive and “to” + gerund

I have searched both Google and this site. According to Collins, predispose can accept both to + infinitive and to + gerund. I find this questionable, but there it is. Other than that, I can think of ...
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2answers
380 views

“Predisposed to” + gerund or infinitive? [closed]

My own logic and basic grammar rules would say gerund: He is predisposed to plagiarizing. Because I would also say: He is predisposed to plagiarism. But Google tells me that: He is predisposed ...
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2answers
445 views

“All I want is for him to return safe” Why isn't it “…for him is to…”?

All I want is _______ to return safe I have encountered the question like the title in the book "Starter TOEIC" 3rd edition by Anne Taylor, which is in "Infinitives and Gerunds" unit. 4 options are: ...
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1answer
556 views

“I was starting suspecting something was wrong” <— What's the grammar problem here? [duplicate]

I have been using “starting suspecting” frequently thinking that it’s correct too but recently my friend corrected me. I don't understand why. It is well-known that start to + verb and start verb-ing ...
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1answer
20k views

proud to be & proud of being

I have the following two sentences which I would like to confirm the difference in meaning for. I am proud to be a nurse. I am proud of being a nurse. I'm mainly wondering about the difference in ...
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255 views

Bare infinitive with exceptions

Reading the sentence: "We were still talking about what we should do when we heard the children shouting". in the above sentence, why don't we write "heard the children shout", as the verb 'hear' ...
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1answer
31 views

difference in meaning between 2 phrases [duplicate]

I need to know the difference between these two sentences 1)He stopped to playing football 2)He stopped playing football
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1answer
488 views

Finish reading or finish of read. Why we use gerund forms as infinitives verbs?

I see that some words in English are expressed in gerund, with the meaning corresponding to the infinitive, and used as infinitive verbs. Could someone please explain to me, why does this happen? I'm ...