Questions tagged [indirect-question]

A sentence that reports a question and ends with a period rather than a question mark

6
votes
5answers
4k views

Is the inversion in “Let’s see ʜᴏᴡ ᴄᴀɴ ᴡᴇ do this” an error for “Let’s see ʜᴏᴡ ᴡᴇ ᴄᴀɴ do this”?

I’m reading about the C++ Boost library, and the following sentence from Boost.ORG drew my attention: Once the two steps have been successfully completed, the process can start writing to and ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

“What's” in indirect questions

Lets consider the following: The book doesn't explain, "What's the wisdom behind education?" Changing this to an indirect question becomes the following: The book doesn't explain what the ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

Where does the verb go on this question? Is it even a reported question?

I understand that when I report a question, I put the subject back in front of the verb, as in: "He asked if she was going to be late." But I always get puzzled when it comes to reporting a question ...
2
votes
2answers
605 views

Inversion/non-inversion in wh-questions with long phrases after the wh-words

Can a sentence like this: "I don't know who the first man that made such and such thing in such and such place was," be grammatically correct if we don't put "was" at the end of the long phrase, ...
6
votes
5answers
66k views

What is the correct punctuation for an indirect question?

I'm wondering how it is correct to structure sentence and what punctuation should be used. In particular, is the next sentence correct: I was wondering if there's any progress on the issue. Or ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Long subjects in indirect questions

I know that to indirectly ask: What is your name? I should say something like: I don't know what your name is. But what if the subject of question is longer than "your name"? Something like: ...
27
votes
7answers
93k views

“I can't seem to” vs “I can't”

I am wondering why would someone say "I can't seem to" instead of simply saying "I can't". Is there any specific difference between the two? Is the former usage informal? Is it correct to say that the ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“Tell me why I should marry you” or “Tell me why should I marry you?”. Which is correct? [duplicate]

I have always followed the former rule, i.e, "Tell me why I should marry you" (without a question mark). But my cousin insists the latter is correct. He seems equally confident that he is correct. So ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Word order for subordinate questions

I know subordinate questions have no inversion. Should this sentence: "Do you know what are the good things to do around here?" be "Do you know what the good things are to do around here?" ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Alternative to Indirect Questions

The syntax for indirect questions is that the verb goes after the subject such as, I am wondering what the time is. If not asked as an indirect or embedded question, what punctuation would you use ...
0
votes
1answer
218 views

wish to know what the correct order is

Here is a quote out of the novel "The Heiress": "...and it would have been difficult to decide who was the most gratified of the three; certainly Helen was not the least so." Shouldn't the correct ...
-1
votes
1answer
63 views

Indirect question using the verb “amount to”

A amounts to B. Which of the following is the correct form of indirect question related to the above sentence? 1) Could you tell me to what A amounts? 2) Could you tell me what A amounts to? ...