Questions tagged [indirect-objects]

for questions concerning the use of indirect objects

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41 views

“Log hours against a task”

To give a little bit of context, I work on an software development company and we use a project management tool in which we raise tasks (we call them jiras, actually, but nevermind that) that ...
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112 views

In “You did me wrong”, is “wrong” an adverb or some other part of speech instead?

Consider: You did me wrong. In that sentence, is wrong an adverb or some other part of speech? I don’t understand the syntactic construction being used here.
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The semantic role of an object of a verb

I've posted a question in English Language Learners as to this sentence: Mom made me a sandwich. The intended meaning was "Mom made a sandwich, intending it for me." There, I came to realize that ...
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1answer
44 views

Is it idiomatically to say “It is <adverb> doesn't …”?

Several times I met the phrase as: "It is currently doesn't ...", for example "It is currently doesn't work...". First of all, it seems that the phrase itself is grammatically incorrect, because the ...
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2answers
101 views

When i quote you from him you do not listen but when i quote you from Einstein you listen [closed]

Feeling great to join this network. I appreciate it. I have a question: is it better to use the word quote or cite in such situation talking with a hypocrite person? "When I quote you from him ...
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Is it “George and I” or “George and me”? [duplicate]

Recently, at McCain's funeral Obama said: "After all, what better way to have the last laugh than to make George and I say nice things about him to a national audience." Is it "George and I" or "...
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2answers
65 views

Is expression “It does us no harm.” grammatically correct?

I would write it with "to": "It does to us no harm." or "It does no harm to us". Similar example from https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/do-to "I’ll never forgive him for ...
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1answer
150 views

Indirect object pronoun before direct object

I have seen a few people say that indirect objects that are in the form of a pronoun should be placed before the direct object in a sentence. Why is that? I didn’t know it mattered. For example: “I ...
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1answer
159 views

Confusing syntax in sentences with indirect object complements

Some verbs produce unambiguous syntax when used with an indirect object. I brought a toy to Katy. --> I brought Katy a toy. I bought flowers for my wife. --> I bought my wife flowers. ...
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1answer
286 views

Which is the direct object and which is the object complement in this sentence? [duplicate]

I was reading a book on English grammar and it stated that the object complement may also be an adjective. In the sentence "Roger called George heartless", Roger was the subject, called was the verb, ...
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1answer
56 views

Comma in to kick someone something

Which of the following is correct? 1) I kicked Tim the bag 2) I kicked Tim, the bag (with a comma) I want to say that I kicked the bag to Tim, do I need to put a comma after Tim? Thank you
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1answer
171 views

Verbs which do not take indirect object pronouns

I have a book with exercises of the type: My uncle sent a book to my sister. Which should be transformed as: My uncle sent my sister a book. There are some which do not seem to work well: ...
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3answers
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“I remember the advice he gave to me” Why add preposition to?

While I was reading a book, I stumbled upon a sentence "I remember the advice he gave to me". From my understanding, give can be used in two ways. First. Give + IO + DO. For example, "He gave me an ...
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2answers
318 views

What is the subject in “The gift Karen gave to her brother is a teddy bear”?

I am unable to ascertain what would be the subject in the following sentence. The gift Karen gave to her brother is a teddy bear. Here the relative pronoun (that) has been omitted after the word ...
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1answer
940 views

Which one is the direct object and indirect object?

Everyone is looking at us. In the above sentence, "to look" is the verb, "everyone" the subject. Is "us" a direct object or indirect object? How do you find the DO and IO?
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382 views

Diagramming a Sentence with a Causative Verb

For a Reed–Kellogg sentence diagram, how would you diagram a sentence with a causative verb like "made"? For example: The hot weather made her want to swim. I understand that "weather" is the ...
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2answers
489 views

what is the direct object & the indirect object in the sentence in my post

I am trying to learn about direct and indirect objects. My question is sadly very simple but I'm unsure. In the sentence below what is the direct object & what is the indirect object? She should ...
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1answer
564 views

Using “With” as Part of Indirect Object or Prepositional Phrase [closed]

Update Oddly, the question was closed for "being unclear what you're asking" -- even though it is quite clear what I was asking since (1) I asked a direct question and (2) people gave very specific ...
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1answer
184 views

What type of object is 'whom' in this sentence?

In the sentence Whom is she calling? what type of object is whom? Is whom an indirect object because she is doing the calling to a person referred to as whom?
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1answer
101 views

Can the verb 'last' ever be ditransitive?

(1) That car should last you for ten years. (2) That car should last you ten years. I think these two mean the same thing. In (1), the verb 'last' is clearly monotransitive. How about the ...
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2answers
396 views

Since the rules do not forbid “I brought him him”, can I therefore say it that way?

I’ve searched about direct and indirect objects, and all explanations have led me to think that I could say this: ?I brought him him. Is that allowed? I think it should be, since the rules governing ...
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0answers
37 views

Direct object's placement [duplicate]

According to Longman's English grammar's book: We can use two objects after verbs like give and buy. Instead of: Give the book to me, we can say: Give me the book. lnstead of: Buy the book for ...
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0answers
973 views

Direct and indirect object with “give” and “buy”

I have been studying Longman's English grammar book, and something is really confusing me: We can put it and them after the verb: Give it to me. Buy them for me. Do it for me. With e.g. give and buy, ...
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1answer
444 views

Is this an indirect object?

"I stole a wallet from her" I have always known indirect verbs to be "to" someone, can a direct object be taken "from" the indirect object?
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Question About Diagramming

This has to do with indirect objects. Take these two sentences for example: The ship's captain gave the crew orders. The ship's captain gave orders to the crew. The first sentence is easy to ...
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1answer
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Verbs without prepositions [closed]

I was wondering if there exist some list of all verbs we do not put a preposition after them in a sentence? I'm talking about 2 objects in a sentence - the verb is before indirect object. Eg. I told ...
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2answers
62 views

Do I need a “with” in the following sentence?

Usually, I know the answer. But the following sentence confuses me: Was he the man she had shared her flesh and feelings (with) for four years? Is the with necessary? Why or why not?
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Can a prepositional phrase act as an indirect object?

For example, in the sentence: I baked a cake for my mom. Direct object (DO): cake Indirect object (IO): for my mom Some webpages say IO can only come before DO While others explain that a ...
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3answers
1k views

Can an infinitive be used as an indirect object?

Is it possible to use an infinitive as an indirect object? For example, in the sentence 'I persuaded him to go there,' I guess that 'him' is the direct object and 'to go there' is an indirect object....
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2k views

“He who” as an indirect object [duplicate]

Is the following incorrect? Return it to he who gave it to you. Presuming it is, how would I correct it? (without resorting to saying "to the person who gave it to you," which is somewhat ...
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Is “Whom did you give the book?” ungrammatical?

You gave him the book.                       (1) Based on the sentence (1), it seems to me that the following form of question is possible: ...
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2answers
671 views

Indirect objects that answer the question “by whom”

Here is a sentence from Chapter Seventeen of Huckleberry Finn. The sentence appears in a grammar worksheet: When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking and unbarring and ...
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634 views

Why does a pronoun as the predicate of an indirect object (e.g. “I gave her it”) sound wrong?

Forgive me if I've used the wrong terms in the title, I did my best given my middle-school grammar lessons and Wikipedia. "I gave her the book" sounds just fine, but "I gave her it" sounds stilted ...
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Question about indirect object?

Grammar is driving me crazy. What would crazy be in this sentence? Is it an indirect object?
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856 views

“The mixture was added water”: Is “add” a double-object verb?

The mixture was added water. This sentence, written by a non-native speaker, seems somehow odd to me, but I cannot say that I find it at all ambiguous. This example sentence is written by a speaker ...
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Indirect object? Direct object? In active voice? In passive voice?

The following sentence has an active voice verb and an indirect object (IO) me and a direct object (DO) book: "Jeff gave me a book." As I understand, a passive voice verb comprises (1) a form of the ...
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2answers
84 views

Does including an indirect object in a question change the answer or just help specify it?

For example, I'm trying to figure out what the proper answer to a question like, "Why did the car blow up two weeks ago?" Would the answer to the question be simply the reason why the car blew up, ...
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3answers
195 views

Can the verb “gain” take two complements?

Is it correct to say: The prudent guidance and innovation gained Jane and John much fame. I think that this sentence is grammatically incorrect because the verb gain cannot take two complements ...
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880 views

Direct object before indirect object

In this article on the changes in English grammar the author says: How untrammelled the English passive is, may be seen in the fact that, not content with a construction like “A book was given him,”...
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Indirect vs direct object

Consider the two sentences John taught himself calculus. John taught himself. In the first sentence 'himself' is the indirect object and 'calculus' is the direct object. In the second ...
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352 views

What is the meaning “It is permitted us to know …”

I saw a sentence It is permitted us to know respecting the signs, which are spoken by the prophets, for they foretold signs by which the consummation of the times is to be expected by us from day ...
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1answer
3k views

send something to someone or somewhere

Background: I am writing a computer application which can understand English sentence. For that purpose, I was preparing frames of each word. For example: send something to recipient|place Since ...
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380 views

How do I differentiate between direct and indirect object with an object of a preposition present?

I am working on the following sentence: They will look toward me, whom they pierced. I am aware that a basic rule to identifying an indirect object is to ask, "to whom?" However, in this case, I am ...
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1answer
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Time given us or time given to us

I read this quote online: "All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us" - J. R. R. Tolkien Is it just a relaxation of pronunciation of "the time that [god] has given us" ? ...
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10answers
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Can a sentence have an indirect object without a direct object?

Everywhere I look online, people seem to say the same thing: "A sentence with an indirect object must have a direct object." Every case of confusion I've seen about this rule has only involved ...
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1answer
940 views

Using only a direct object with the verb “give”

Is it possible to use the verb give with only a direct object? For example, Could you give the definition? Or need I to add an indirect object, so the sentence becomes Could you give me the ...
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4answers
283 views

Direct Object vs Indirect Object in “I taught my cat”

In the sentence "I taught my cat some tricks", the direct object is "tricks" and the indirect object is "cat". In the sentence "I taught my cat", what are the direct and indirect objects, if any?
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Another 'me' versus 'myself' usage question

I am quitting a job. I wrote a letter of resignation and have come upon the following sentence: "Moreover, I believe [name of restaurant] will be better suited to have an employee that is different ...
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Do indirect objects in English always mean “to” or “for”?

"I gave him two dollars." This tacitly means "to him". Are there exceptions to the rule that an indirect object in English always means "to" or "for"? In English, "I stole him two dollars" does not ...
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5answers
4k views

Why is “look” transitive in “look you in the eye”?

Why is look used as a transitive verb in the phrase look you in the eye? I checked look in Cambridge Dictionaries and found only an intransitive look, not a transitive one.