Questions tagged [indian-english]

Questions related to the English language as spoken and written in India.

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What's the American or British English equivalent to "take a download from", meaning get to know the information from someone?

In Indian English, we often use the phrase "take a download from" which isn't common outside India or at least South Asia. This phrase means to get to know the information from someone. For ...
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1 vote
1 answer
81 views

Is 'peasant' generally considered derogatory?

Is peasant when used in general to describe a modern socioeconomic class considered to be derogatory? Apparently there is no issue when talking about European history... I read in the Brtitannica ...
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4 answers
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Does "tuition classes" mean the same in US English US as it does in Indian English?

I am trying to write a sentence that says how others had the capability to pay for extra classes other than school to get better learning. My peers always had their parents who could pay for tuition ...
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2 votes
4 answers
450 views

Can Practice (verb) and Practise (verb) indicate two different meanings?

I recall that at school (in the late 1960s/early 1970s) in England I was taught how and when to use Practice and Practise. What I was taught was this: Practice, when used as a verb, means to do ...
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1 answer
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What is the etymology of the term “creamy layer” in Indian politics?

According to Wikipedia, “creamy layer is a term used in Indian politics to refer to members of a backward class who are highly advanced socially as well as economically and educationally, and not ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Is this a valid usage of "forget about" - "X can't afford three meals a day, forget about sanitary living conditions" [duplicate]

I was trying to cobble together a sentence expressing the idea above, that: something doesn't do X, and so, definitely doesn't do Y (which is harder than X). I grew up using ", forget about&...
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21 votes
4 answers
3k views

What's the meaning of "wooden loaf", the famous expression used by Gandhi to define the Independence of India?

I came across this expression while reading about the history of Indian Independence. The expression is well known, but I cannot understand its meaning. Does loaf mean piece of bread? But then what is ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What does a "non-cooperate and prepare for civil disobedience" mean in this speech? [closed]

[[26]]Mussalmans are not a minority as it is commonly known and understood. One has only got to look round. Even today, according to the British map of India, out of eleven provinces, four provinces ...
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1 vote
1 answer
92 views

Is it normative to use "even" in the sense of "too", "also"?

My colleagues often use "even" as in "Even I was thinking about that" instead of "I also was thinking about that". This usage seems to be widespread in India. Is it ...
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Use of ‘had’ in Indian English

Soon after she encountered the experience while proceeding to New Delhi, the Thoothukudi MP had tweeted, “Today at the airport a CISF officer asked me if I am an Indian, when I asked her to speak to ...
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2 votes
1 answer
640 views

Is modern 'five countries' English the only type of English with stress patterns that change across the entire word depending on the suffix?

The capital letters represent where the main stress in each word lies TELephone, telePHONic, teLEphony. PHOTograph, photoGRAphic, photOgraphy. biOLogy, bioLOGical. What about in the past, including ...
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3 votes
1 answer
84 views

Placement of infinitive [closed]

How do you expect a debate on the green new deal between Marjorie Taylor Greene and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to go? Or How do you expect a debate on the green new deal to go between Marjorie Taylor ...
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2 votes
1 answer
286 views

What are the differences between Indian English and other (native) varieties?

From my observation, I can identify some differences. Indian speakers use some Hindi words which are not found among native speakers. Indian speakers pronounce 'w' and 'v' interchangeably. Indian ...
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1 answer
749 views

What is the exact meaning of "I wouldn't have it any other way"?

I've seen this sentence used massively by people on social media posts. Hence I searched about this on google but couldn't understand the exact meaning. What I have found on my research has given ...
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Single word for people having romance over skin tone, fame and money?

Except for "gold digger" or "friends with benefits", is there any single word to call people who want to have romance because of money, fame, skin tone, and citizenships ?
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Subject verb agreement query

Is the following sentence correct? 'They are a couple.' 'A' makes 'couple' singular in this sentence (although 'couple'is already a singular noun) so how can we use 'they' and 'are' for 'couple' as it ...
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3 votes
1 answer
5k views

What is the meaning of "coming Friday"? [closed]

Suppose today is Wednesday and someone told me to schedule the meeting on the coming Friday. Which Friday would that be?
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3 votes
1 answer
217 views

What is the origin of extra prepositions added after verbs in Indian English?

It seems that speakers of Indian English often add prepositions to create phrasal verbs in situations where the verb would have been sufficient on its own. Some examples I have noticed: to “pass out” ...
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2 votes
1 answer
462 views

Origin of the Indian version of the mnemonic for the planets

The most common planetary mnemonic is: My very educated mother just served us nine pizzas Another popular planetary mnemonic is: My very educated mother just showed us nine planets A planetary ...
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0 votes
1 answer
144 views

How can I speak English fluently in 45 days? [closed]

I am new to start learning English. I want to improve my reading, writing & speaking english I have only 45 days to complete this course. Where I start learning. I am searching online for videos, ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Phenomenon, when a phrase (lit. trans. into English from other regional language) has obvious mistake(s) and still uncorrectable due to popularity

Let me layout an example to make the situation, described in question more clear: There is a popular road in a city of Gujarat, India whose name when literally translated into English means "Horse ...
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Pronunciation of "intermediate" as /ɪntə(ɹ)ˈmiːdʒɪt/?

I've heard both "intermediate" and "immediate" pronounced /ɪntə(ɹ)ˈmiːdʒɪt/ and /ɪˈmiːdʒɪt/ respectively in Indian English. Wiktionary has /ɪˈmiːdʒɪt/ as an alternative pronunciation for immediate for ...
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Which one is correct? Australia 'has' defeated India in world cup. or Australia 'have' defeated India in world cup

Here Australia means the Australian team and not just the country. I have read in a book that, 'have' to be used in case of team name of some country. But it doesn't seem promising to me. Please help.
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Using Have word to ask question related to past

Please check below sentence Have you setup desktop software and mobile app? This type of question, where the event has already occurred in past, always makes me feel that the question is not ...
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0 answers
55 views

Can I say that sentence makes you special?

When someone comes from other country and they pronounce "good morning" in my local language (when that pronunciation is unique)... Then can I say: "that sentence makes you special" Or "that ...
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0 votes
2 answers
3k views

What is a "loose character" in Indian English?

What does the phrase "loose character" in Indian English mean? E.g. "He is a loose character", or, "He has a loose character"
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0 votes
3 answers
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What is the relationship name of my wife's father's sister's son to me? [duplicate]

Actually i'm filling leave form, which has field reasons for leave.
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5 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is bad English called "Butler English"?

When somebody speaks bad English it is called Butler English in India. The phrase Butler English seems to have originated in Madras presidency in the British Rule. The butlers or the maid servants ...
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0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Apostrophes in Grammar [duplicate]

In the sentence- "Jessie's and Nora's dogs are lovely". Do we really have to put apostrophes on both the names?
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0 votes
1 answer
300 views

Rendezvous with Ray [closed]

Rendezvous is one of the English words whose pronunciation is nothing to do with its spelling .I have come across the word in the lesson Rendezvous with Ray I have understood ...
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8 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is “suite” pronounced like “suit” in any native English-speaking countries?

The word suite is pronounced the same as sweet in British and American English. Surprisingly, even some educated Indians mispronounce it almost similar to suit. Even name boards ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
611 views

How far have you understood my lesson? [closed]

As far as I know your answer is correct..I think this statement is correct. How far have you understood my lesson? I am doubtful about the correctness of the sentence.But how ...
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1 vote
4 answers
3k views

She is his would be/ wife to be

In India there is a tendency to call a woman or a man as would be in the sense of his future wife or her future husband. She is his would be ( wife) He is ...
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2 votes
0 answers
94 views

Indian - mother tongue influence

I'm an Indian who has huge mother tongue influence while speaking English. I have to talk to Americans due to my job. I frequently use "like this only" & "like that only" while speaking to ...
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2 votes
0 answers
136 views

Where does the phrase "cheater caught, Peter red" come from?

Growing up in Pakistan, I heard variations of this. It was either: Cheater caught, Peter red; or Cheater cock, Peter red I assumed it was about a cocky boy named Peter who was either caught red-...
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0 votes
1 answer
170 views

They have some background strong

I'm trying to understand the meaning of the expression "background strong". The line in the title is quoted from a movie, "Dying to survive". Here is some frame: an indian oil shop owner wants to ...
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4 votes
3 answers
4k views

What's the meaning of "the same" in Indian English [duplicate]

I work in tech, and at the company I work for employs and does business with a lot of Indian businesses and individuals. When exchanging emails, I've been noticing the use of "the same" in a ...
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-3 votes
1 answer
318 views

I want to check with my account team regarding payment processing, how to ask?

I have to ask one of the account team members, if today they are going to provide payment. How can I ask them, I want to know the correct English sentence? I have prepared some sentences, can ...
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1 vote
2 answers
153 views

Meaning of gram-vendor in context

Reading Shame (1983) by Salman Rushdie, and here's such a sentence. For five, six, seven days films played to an empty house in which peeling plaster and slowly rotating ceiling fans and the ...
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0 votes
1 answer
342 views

What is meaning of "Wrestling words into submission"? [closed]

I came across a sentence which goes "I knew I wasn't meant to spend my life locked away in a silent room alone and half-crazed, wrestling words into submission." Can some please tell me what it means?...
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0 votes
1 answer
359 views

Meaning of "textbook Launch" in given sentence?

In a post-launch address from the Sriharikota launch port, K. Sivan, Chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation(ISRO), hailed the event as a textbook launch of a very important and complex ...
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0 votes
1 answer
134 views

What does the word "Stone" mean in this context [closed]

A book by Salman Rushdie ("Shame"), Hindu–Islamic tensed relations are described. So there are several words starting/containing the word Stone Stonewasher Stone-gang Stone-godly 'The one-godly ...
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2 votes
2 answers
63 views

Indian English, use of who

Maya is sister of dhara who is doctor. Maya is sister of dhara, who is doctor. In both statements who is used for which person???
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12 votes
2 answers
3k views

Why is Indian English usually rhotic?

It seems that speakers of Indian English generally speak with a rhotic accent, pronouncing an [r] in all cases where spelled, whereas a speaker of British English would leave it off in postvocalic ...
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1 vote
2 answers
195 views

What does "straggle on his chin" means?

What does "straggle on his chin" mean? As I shook his hand, a kid cruising by—no more than a sophomore, judging by the fresh crop of pimples and the serio-comic straggle on his chin that aspired to ...
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5 votes
1 answer
835 views

British South Asian accent

This is a two-part question. A lot of British South Asian that are born and bred in the UK have a peculiar accent. It's very different than the familiar Indian accent too. So my question is... Is ...
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0 votes
1 answer
3k views

Which is the correct? A universally or an universally? [duplicate]

Which is the correct option for below sentence? Who doesn't know that he is ____ universally acclaimed writter? 1) a 2) an Thanks in advance.
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24 votes
5 answers
9k views

Is "I" an alphabet or a letter?

I came across this sentence, "Modi understands only one alphabet, and that is the capital I" in the Indian writer Dr. Shashi Tharoor's recently published book "The Paradoxical Prime ...
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13 votes
2 answers
3k views

What is the origin of "prepone" in Indian English?

As Merriam-Webster notes, to prepone meaning “to move to an earlier time” is widely used by India's English speakers, but largely unheard outside the subcontinent. Interestingly, the term was used as ...
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0 votes
1 answer
319 views

Is it OK to use two consecutive 'that' in a sentence? [duplicate]

Is the usage of 2 consecutive 'that' in the following sentence correct, because it looks a bit odd? Should these be separated by comma perhaps? "While I agree that strength and size definitely gives ...
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