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Questions tagged [indefinite-pronouns]

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Why is an "a" article being used here? I would use "the" instead

The Senate late Thursday passed a House-approved bill to raise the debt ceiling and cap government spending for two years, sending the legislation to President Joe Biden’s desk . https://www.cnbc.com/...
Jaroslav Tavgen's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
106 views

How should I refer to a person without identifying them? Can I use 'one'? [closed]

If I wish to refer to an individual person but without describing that person or drawing attention to the characteristics of that person or without identifying that person - how should I do it ? The ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
151 views

What is it called when indefinite pronouns are used as determiner?

AFAIK it is correct English grammar to say something along the lines of Familiarize yourself with everything Apple. What is this use of "everything" called? Is it just a short colloquial ...
leonheess's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
78 views

Can we use the indefinite pronoun “someone” as a possessive pronoun “someone’s”? (not only as a possessive determiner)

We can use personal pronouns in the possessive case: The book is mine. / Mine is missing. The shirt is yours. / Yours is missing. Can we use the indefinite pronoun someone like this? The book is ...
Hadman's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
13 views

Relative clause - situational instances [duplicate]

I was taught “which” can be used to refer to a situation or event in the preceding clause, as well as referring directly to the person or thing immediately in front of “which”. But how do you tell the ...
Claire's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
458 views

What type of pronouns are "other" and "another"? [closed]

When used as pronouns, are "other" and "another" classified as indefinite pronouns?
tangosquared's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
636 views

Is 'each other' used correctly when talking about sets of more than two people? [duplicate]

I have seen a statement: We have a Christian duty to serve each other. Is this statement correct? Because 'each other' is used for two persons and 'one another' for more than two persons.
user372766's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
231 views

Pronoun "something" in negative sentences [duplicate]

I haven't found any information about a grammar rule that describes the possibility of somebody/something in negative sentences. In this sentence, for example: "Something is not right." ...
Vadim Kiselev's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
3k views

something the matter (strange word order: indefinite pronoun + noun) [duplicate]

ldoceonline.com: 1. There was nothing the matter with it when I lent it to him. 2. She had something the matter with her back. oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: 3. There's something the ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 655
0 votes
3 answers
3k views

Should an antecedent of "everyone" take "their" or "his" or "our" as its corresponding possessive pronoun? [duplicate]

I am still confused about how to use the word everyone. I have this sentence on a test: Everyone wants to do their part. Everyone wants to do his part. Everyone wants to do our part. ...
Lee's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
102 views

Doesn't and Their [duplicate]

'Everyone who doesn't cook their food' Is it correct? If it's correct then can you explain why do we use doesn't but the possessive pronoun is Their?
Allison's user avatar
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1 answer
1k views

What possessive is used when "everybody" is the antecedent? [duplicate]

Is this sentence right? Everybody is wasting his time. Is his or its the possessive of everybody? Most people use his but in my opinion it should be its: Everybody is wasting its time. I ...
user284655's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

What does "without one" mean? [duplicate]

I would like to pose the following question: does the expression "without one X" mean unambiguously "without any X", mean unambiguously "without a(n) X" or can have both meanings and thus is an odd ...
Gianni Rossi's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
63 views

can "one' be substituted by "they" in a sentence? [duplicate]

I'm wondering if this sentence makes sense. If more examples could be offered, that would be appreciated. Thank you. As long as one has a pastor certificate and gifts and can analyze the Bible, it ...
Daisy White's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the possessive form of “neither”?

I’m working on a worksheet and it’s telling me to make up a sentence using the possessive form of the indefinite pronoun neither. It says to use apostrophes on all these pronouns to make them ...
Seth Gilpin's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
266 views

Style of grammar in which one does not refer directly to people?

There is first person, second person and third person grammar, but what is the term for the type of grammar used when one should refrain from directly referring from specific people (you, them, me, I, ...
Toby's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
194 views

Is there a technical name, grammatically, for the use of "it" in a non-specific way?

A year or more ago, someone on this website used a word which I cannot now recall. He or she used the word to describe how the word it is often used in a non-specific way and with no clear referent. ...
rhetorician's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
83 views

Is 'you' acceptable here, or should it be 'he'? [closed]

Jonas found a job as a newspaper boy, when you could find a boy selling newspapers on every corner. Is 'you' here acceptable or does it need to be changed to 'he'? I see it as a matter of everyone ...
Revlis Lain's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
270 views

Use of 'which' versus 'that'

The examples are as follows. The idea that has drawn a significant interest is very hard to design. The idea, which has drawn a significant interest, is very hard to design. The idea that has drawn a ...
Mithun's user avatar
  • 105
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2 answers
6k views

"This one is" OR "This is"

I have seen people using "This one is Daddy's" with the word "one" before a form of the verb be. I am confused about which is more accurate, to use: This is Daddy's. or This one is Daddy's. ...
eudoraleer's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
183 views

Can the pronoun "one" precede the thing it is referring to in a sentence?

I give an example so you understand right away what I'm asking. Does the following sentence sound right: Users are parts of not only the one being discussed right now, but the already-mentioned two ...
tom's user avatar
  • 203
0 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why are indefinite singular third person pronouns treated as plurals? [duplicate]

It's always bugged me. My research behind this question was rather shallow, so I apologize if it's a duplicates. Thanks! Edit, example: Say you don't know who you are talking to on Reddit, you simply ...
Hugo M. Zuleta's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
180 views

Pronoun Agreement [duplicate]

Lately, I've been trying to understand the use of pronoun agreement in depth. While in the process I came across this website. According to the Author: Professional writers might revise the ...
Ray.Rai's user avatar
  • 11
9 votes
1 answer
40k views

From one to another or From one to the other?

Is there a difference if I say "the recipe varies from one cook to the other" or "the recipe varies from one cook to another"?
nicog's user avatar
  • 99
1 vote
1 answer
38k views

What's the difference between "someone" and "somebody"? [duplicate]

What is the difference between "someone is waiting for me" and "somebody is waiting for me?" Please make it clear for me.
user78248's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
811 views

Plural indefinite pronouns?

Can some indefinite pronouns be plural? One commenter on Mr K's Grammar World says they cannot. He also says the following examples contain quantifiers, and not indefinite pronouns. Many have ...
Mar Rojo's user avatar
  • 117
4 votes
1 answer
9k views

One vs someone, can be used interchangeably?

I've been searching about the ability to use "one" and "someone" interchangeably but found almost nothing. So what's the difference between them and can they be used interchangeably, for example, in ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 903
-1 votes
1 answer
494 views

Comma before indefinite pronoun

While I would surround a noun or pronoun with commas, should I do the same for indefinite pronouns? For example: Have a good weekend, all. I'm sorry, everybody, I can't do that. Thanks.
James Rampton's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
5k views

Difference between "an" and "one"

Forgive me if I miss something very obvious; English is not my native language. I am currently taking an online (sort of) Math class that aims to teach creating/writing unambiguous Mathematical ...
Annie Lagang's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
844 views

Antecedents of indefinite pronouns

Consider the sentence, "Most of the apples are fresh." Is it incorrect to say that apples is the antecedent of the indefinite pronoun most?
fny's user avatar
  • 111
3 votes
1 answer
509 views

Combination of similar pronouns (indefinite)

Are there any significant differences in meaning or usage between "everyone" and "everybody", or "anybody" and "anyone"? As far as I know, there are some grammatical points involving "everyone" and "...
karthik rangaraj's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
28k views

How to form the possessive case of indefinite pronouns? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Should I use “everyone's”, “everyones'” or “everyones”? I was writing a sentence in Google Docs that contained the following ...
George Edison's user avatar
32 votes
4 answers
16k views

"None" as plural indefinite pronoun

In my grammar book (English Grammar, HarperCollins Publishers), I read that none is occasionally treated as plural, but it is usually regarded as singular. Can you give me an example of sentence where ...
apaderno's user avatar
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