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Questions tagged [imperatives]

Questions regarding use of the Imperative mood - commands or instructions.

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Is it correct to use a full infinitive (to do) instead of a bare [migrated]

Is it correct to use a full infinitive (to do) instead of a bare infinitive (do)? I am an esl Chinese resident. And I read a comment, of which the commentator thinks I am benighted. (But I admit it's ...
fafafafa's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
109 views

Is the imperative a grammatical tense?

Here I have read the following sentence: Write it, along with the rest of your message, in the imperative tense: Up until now I always thought that imperative is not a grammatical tense but a ...
bitbonk's user avatar
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2 answers
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Is "Do this, please" an imperative sentence?

In a similar vein to Could you get me a glass of water, please? Is this an interrogative sentence or an imperative sentence.?, as a general rule, from a purely grammatical viewpoint, is a sentence an ...
Kenn Sebesta's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
451 views

What is the grammatical mood of the sentence "Someone stop that person"?

I was discussing with some friends the grammatical tense of the verb stop in the sentence: Someone stop that person. Despite searching online we did not find a consensus/solution, so we have decided ...
Matheus Manzatto's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
178 views

If "should" is used, then does the sentence become imperative?

Original sentence: Students frequently overuse direct quotations in taking notes, and as a result, they overuse quotations in the final [research] paper (Lester, 2023). Paraphrased sentence: Students ...
tryingtobeastoic's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
24 views

Can articles be omitted in instructions? [duplicate]

On a fire extinguisher's cover, "In case of fire, break glass" may be written. As you see, in short, instructional contexts, one often finds articles being omitted. Is this grammatically ...
baral's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
123 views

Is this a special or ordinary use of "think"?

There is a particular use of the word “think” that I’m familiar with (imperative mood I would say), but unable to find any reference work mentioning it. It’s used when one is suggesting someone might ...
smalltalk's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
490 views

"May I have a mango!" is it an Imperative, Optative or Interrogative sentence?

I am confused in which category to put this sentence. It's a polite request, so it looks like it's an example of Imperative Sentence. But it does express the desire to have mango (even though not ...
Anuj Rao's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
278 views

Does imperative 'do' (in 'do'-support) share the same form with infinitive 'do'?

Without do-support, all imperative verbs are in the same form as infinitive verbs. (1) Shut up. [imperative] (2) I want you to shut up. [infinitive] I can't think of any exceptions. But, with do-...
JK2's user avatar
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-1 votes
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50 views

"Be ready to embrace your skin color"- is this an imperative sentence? [closed]

"Be ready to embrace your skin color" is a slogan from local beauty ads in my country and I wonder if this clause is an imperative or not? If so, does "be ready" function as a verb?...
Tata's user avatar
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1 vote
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What's the proper way to start a sentence with the word "think"?

For example, when trying to describe a product or service on a landing page, how do you arrange the commas and quotes? Concrete example: [clip art describing your product here] Think, 'Uber meets ...
np_'s user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
543 views

Is it possible to make a declarative sentence starting with 'Can'?

everyone As the title shows, is it possible to make a declarative sentence starting with "Can"? For example, 'Please, can we request that you do not accept any proposals from him.' The ...
Daniel Seo's user avatar
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0 answers
144 views

Commas in either/or sentences in the imperative mood

I'm working on a card game. I often come across the need to join two imperative statements with the correlative conjunction "either / or", like so: Either discard a card, or draw a card ...
ThaneOfRoses's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
2k views

Can an imperative sentence have a subject?

Can an imperative sentence have a subject? This is a followup to this comment. User Schmuddi asserted that: English imperative sentences are subjectless. but did not cite any source or authority. I ...
David Siegel's user avatar
1 vote
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48 views

What is the term for telling someone unkindly to go do something

There are phrases we use to tell a person to go do something, elsewhere, away from us, that might cause injury or misfortune. There is not necessarily an expectation that they will do the thing. It is ...
drone6502's user avatar
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Are all verbs imperative? [closed]

It seems that all basic verbs can be considered imperative verbs. Can someone point me to a counter-example?
Janac Meena's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can I say 'right up' as a request to have a ship righted? [closed]

According to Merriam Webster, the word 'right' can be used as a verb meaning "to make a ship upright". Could it be combined with the word 'up' to make it more clear? Like: Sailor: The barge ...
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1 answer
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Comma before "and" with two seemingly imperative clauses

Could some knowledgeable individual please tell me whether this sentence needs a comma before the "and": “Share the good times and stay together with the family at the Grand Hotel in LA”. I ...
Sam's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
329 views

I'll tell you what let's do

There's a relatively common saying, used by at least some speakers of modern English: I'll tell you what let's do. What meaning of let's is used here and what is happening grammatically? It doesn't ...
GJC's user avatar
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1 answer
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Imperative be-passive: "Please be advised"

Is Please be advised an imperative passive, or rather advised is an adjective?
GJC's user avatar
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1 vote
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Interpretation of phrase with imperative

I want to clear up the usage of imperative in the following sentence: "Come here to earn a coffee." Is this sentence equivalent to "if you come here then you will get a coffee"?
ado sar's user avatar
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1 answer
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Could you get me a glass of water, please? Is this an interrogative sentence or an imperative sentence.?

Could you get me a glass of water, please? Is this an interrogative sentence or an imperative sentence?
Amrita Enakshi Mukherjee's user avatar
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23 views

Transformation of sentences

1.'How I wish I had a dog! 2. I wish I had a dog. I came across sentence 2 as the declarative form of sentence 1. As Sentence 2 has the word 'wish' I was wondering should it be an imperative sentence? ...
Amrita Enakshi Mukherjee's user avatar
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0 answers
4k views

Wishing Someone a Happy Birthday

Is it correct to say "Please wish John a very happy birthday from me"? Or should it be "Please wish John a very happy birthday for me"?
grammerguy's user avatar
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1 answer
97 views

Past tense Implied subject [duplicate]

When describing an action preformed by myself, others, or others and myself, I often leave the subject out of the sentence. A: What did you do yesterday? B: Climbed a mountain. What is this called? ...
Andrew Raymond Peters's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
223 views

What form is the "be" in "be that as it may"?

I have a feeling that this may be the dreaded (at least for me) subjunctive. But I'm really hoping it can be analyzed as the imperative instead. I am hoping I can use this expression to help explain a ...
Brian Rak's user avatar
  • 259
2 votes
1 answer
71 views

Verb forms in incomplete sentences (e.g. in phone settings)

I once had a discussion with some of my friends at school about something that is not really referred to by most grammar literature as it is about incomplete sentences/clauses. I'll give you some ...
Jonas L.'s user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
116 views

What does "Disturb not X" mean?

I already know what the word disturb means, but I do not understand what disturb not means. I’ve seen titles that start with this, like Disturb Not the Dream and Disturb Not the Sleep, etc. What does ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
221 views

Infinitives used as imperatives?

There is a passage in The Moonstone (by Wilkie Collins, 1874) which is full of infinitive forms of verbs. ("To xxx"). What I find hard to explain is that despite the infinitives, this passage clearly ...
StayOnTarget's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
6k views

Is the phrase "come fast" a grammatically correct imperative? [closed]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct as a command? "Come fast." I believe this would be a correct alternative: "Come quick."
Vyoam's user avatar
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1 vote
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Imperative sentence patterns …

Please let me ask you native or very well-trained Eglish speakers if there’s some patterns, rules, or formulas in regards of an imperative sentence’s structure. For example, I was reading this ...
fooness's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
952 views

Is this imperative sentence wrong: "Make sure you wouldn't use the stairs"?

In making a list of school rules, one of my students wrote the sentence "Make sure you wouldn't use the stairs." I feel that using the imperative "Make sure" followed by the modal verb "would't" is ...
Michael Daniel's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
180 views

Meaning of "fast inside" (in context)

I am curious what the exact meaning of the phrase "fast inside" is, as used in this sentence by D. H. Lawrence: White savages, with motor-cars, telephones, incomes and ideals! Savages fast inside ...
A. M.'s user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
69 views

Can a proper noun be a predicative in imperatives?

I live in a city called Kobe in the western part of Japan.  Perhaps some of you might have known that it was severely hit and damaged by the Great Hanshin Earthquake some 20 years ago.  The City, ...
Ken Sugayama's user avatar
15 votes
3 answers
5k views

Your will be done or Your will will be done [closed]

So I have seen usages of "Your will be done" in the context when some higher authority is issuing orders but shouldn't it be "Your will will be done"? it makes more semantic sense than the former.
Perseus14's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is 'you are required' an imperative?

I've googled this but I cannot find an answer. The other similar threads asked was can the form of the verb 'be' be an imperative? I don't know if 'you are required' is a form of the 'be' verb. "...
joe's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
2 answers
866 views

Is "Drink milk." a legal imperative sentence? [closed]

I need to interpret simple imperative sentences. Certainly (a) "Drink the milk." is a legal imperative sentence, as are (b) "Drink a milk." and "Drink the milks.," (but with a different "milk" noun). ...
fundagain's user avatar
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11 votes
3 answers
1k views

Imperative well-wishing

Have a nice day. Have a safe flight. The yearbook standard, HAGS. Get better. Even sleep well. In English when we want to wish someone well we often command that well of them. We treat the good ...
Unrelated's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
656 views

Does imperative emphatic sentence work?

I am from Singapore. I have heard many Singaporeans use imperative sentences with emphatic 'do' when they make requests or ask for something to be done a certain way. For example, they would say ...
user284073's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

How to remove "this question" and punctuate the sentence "Answer this question ..." [closed]

In the sentence "Answer this question, what is eleven times nine?" How can I remove "this question", punctuate properly, and still keep the imperative "Answer". How about: "Answer this: what is ...
selden's user avatar
  • 137
1 vote
1 answer
322 views

Can all base forms of verbs express wish?

My text book says that base form of verbs can make sentences whose meanings are wish, for example, in "God save the queen." or "Grammar be hanged." If the sentence's subject is third person and ...
Motoki's user avatar
  • 441
0 votes
3 answers
12k views

What is the difference between "Don't be..." and "Be not..."?

The motivating example is a quote from Jane Austen: Be not alarmed, Madam, on receiving this letter. Note that she starts with "Be not alarmed". If this were, instead: Don't be alarmed, ...
Konstantin Volkov's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
824 views

Does putting an "and" between two verbs alter qualifying clauses?

In the following .. does the 'date clause' apply to one, the other, or both imperatives. "To confirm your miles balance, just purchase and fly with "airline" or the Partner Airlines to any ...
Paige's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
52k views

Will you/won't you?

Help yourself to a drink, _________? A. Will you B. Won't you According to the answer sheet, B is the answer because the question is in fact an offer made to someone and B is more polite. Does that ...
Ithilel's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
446 views

Is "Be ye..." subjunctive or imperative?

In Early Modern English, the second person plural (singular) declensions were: Nominative: - Ye (Thou) Oblique: - You (Thee) --and-- Genitive: Your (Thy & Thine) & Yours' (Thine) In Language ...
Matthew T. Scarbrough's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
21k views

Does "Welcome, Campers" require a comma? [duplicate]

Does a greeting like, "Welcome, Campers" require a comma after "Welcome"? Or can you write "Welcome Campers"? This would be for a sign, or an email where the opening sentence is, "Welcome campers!" ...
debbiesym's user avatar
  • 1,054
-1 votes
1 answer
3k views

Which question tag is correct? "Shut the door, will you?" or "Shut the door, won't you?" [closed]

Shut the door, will you? Shut the door, won't you? I can't tell which way is the correct way. Both of these sound correct to me.
shinama99's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
698 views

Comma before "and" following an imperative

I'm doing some copy editing for a website, and I'm wondering whether there should be a comma in this sentence: "Join the waitlist and be the first to know." My grammar sense makes me think it should ...
Benjamin Wallsten's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
130 views

Is "Show off" here in an imperative mood or something else? [closed]

In this movie clip, there's this conversation between Monkey and Beetle, starting at 50 seconds into the clip: Monkey: What? Beetle: Well, fast learner. Did you know you could do that? Monkey: Show ...
listennever's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
5k views

Is "Don't worry" a complete sentence? [closed]

Is Don't Worry a complete sentence? I've tried many sources but none of them have given an answer.
BlackjackSun's user avatar