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-1
votes
0answers
14 views

Correct use? “Done in for [insert misdeed]”

Is the following correct use of the idiom "done in for": You will get done in for trademark violation if you don't fix those product titles.
1
vote
1answer
66 views

The phrase 'mentally check out'

I asked an older English person about this phrase, but he was unaware of it. Is it new slang that someone of his generation wouldn’t have heard, or is it strictly American English? I don't have an ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

How to translate “for *cough* decades”?

I came across a sentence in a comment in Stack Exchange Workplace which I can not translate: have been freelance for *cough* decades Can anyone help me? Here is the link to original post - see ...
1
vote
0answers
81 views

I have problems with some Irish slang

I am translating a text set in Ireland and there are some Irish phrases that I do not understand. 1- Bartley Butt-end-of-the-village: I could only find one reference in the internet. Does this mean a ...
2
votes
5answers
149 views

Word or a short phrase to describe a person who is socially responsible

I’m looking for a single catchy word or a short phrase to describe a person who is socially responsible. The “responsibility” meaning seems to be too official and not catchy enough. I’m looking for a ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

What' s the meaning of 'mole trap'?

sorry if my English is not good . in season 1-episode 3 of "killing Eve", there a conversation about a murder between Eve and Jin. Jin want to give something Secretly to Eve. Eve : What is that? ...
4
votes
2answers
241 views

When and where did “bad boy” start being used to mean something impressive, e.g. “Let's take this bad boy out for a spin!”

The term "bad boy" literally means a boy who is bad. Those of us who were boys and grew up speaking English are likely to have heard it applied to us, either as a description or a warning. Somewhere ...
4
votes
3answers
406 views

responsible as to her keel

In the short story, The Last Cruise of the Judas Iscariot by Edward Page Mitchel, which tells the story of Captain Cram, a sailor in Main, who builds a schooner with three masts, which was considered ...
2
votes
2answers
102 views

“sink my jig” in nautical dialect

In a short story by Edward Page Mitchel entitled The Last Cruise of the Judas Iscariot, captain Cram, a sailor from Main, tells the story of him building a schooner with three masts, which was frowned ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

knocked clean out

In a short story entitled The Last Cruise of the Judas Iscariot by Edward Page Mitchel, Captain Cram, a sailor in Main, builds a schooner with three masts, which is considred by the town's people as a ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

When should I use “Keep it civil”?

Here is where I first heard the slang: Champion for Democracy? - Woodrow Wilson Towards the end of the video, Neidell urges viewers to post their views about Wilson and says: "Please keep it civil!",...
-1
votes
2answers
188 views

What do these words and sentences mean?

I'm translating an episode of a TV series called "Sons of Anarchy". In a scene (where business partners have a meeting): A: "Quinn showed us some Red Woody rough cuts. Business is good." B: ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Idiom: Origin of the phrase “a bit how ya going” to mean questionable or 'not quite right'

In Australia, where I live, it is not uncommon for people to describe something as "a bit 'how ya goin''" to mean that it's a little bit dodgy, or not quite right. An example is "Hey don't you have ...
4
votes
1answer
112 views

Translation and etymology of a slang passage

While reading software-user reviews on Google Play Store, I happened to run across the following (verbatim): "I'm game ginger an as wet as, a otters pocket full support to do you will ave to be ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

What does “stay locked in” mean, when NBA basketball players use that term?

The answers from many NBA players to questions from the media personnel are usually of the form: ...yeah...we just gotta stay locked in for 48 minutes and get it done. What does 'stay locked in' ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Alternative way of saying “calling a spade a spade” [duplicate]

I found this expression curt and powerful. But I also understand it's offensive to someone, and somehow, has a racist implication. Is there a similar curt and powerful expression I can use without ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

Origin of being “caught flat-footed”

The idiomatic expression "caught flat-footed" originated in sports at the beginning of the 20th century according the following source: caught unprepared, taken by surprise, as in The reporter'...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the meaning of “dry patch” in this context? [closed]

I was going through a dry patch at home... Natives needed. Not so sure on the meaning myself. Update After seeing where the comments are getting at, I should note that it's spoken language, said ...
1
vote
2answers
778 views

Catch phrase/idiom/slang for every bad thing happens for a good reason [duplicate]

Is there any catch-phrase/idiom/slang I can use to express that every bad thing happens for a good reason? (or that bad things could lead to good consequences eventually)?
4
votes
5answers
3k views

Phrase to mean a 'bad teacher'/'poor teacher'

What phrase, expression, or even well-known literary character signifies a 'bad/poor/incompetent/incapable teacher', that is, someone who is not good at teaching. I would like to describe a teacher in ...
-2
votes
1answer
92k views

What does “something got me like” mean? [closed]

For example: "Instagram stories got me like, you all need to listen to better music".
1
vote
0answers
130 views

Term for derogatory suffix used with city names?

When speaking of a city in negative terms one might attach a prefix/suffix to the city name. This nickname is a portmanteau that implies a derogatory tone. Most often this will be a negative term but ...
22
votes
5answers
17k views

Origin of the term “red cent”

Does anyone have any insight into the actual origin of the term red cent? I've heard several timelines and possible origins, including cardboard 1/10-of-a-penny coins early in the 20th century, the ...
1
vote
1answer
178 views

What does “move his bust around” mean in this context? [closed]

Quite the contrary, actually. Winston Churchill, on the other hand, was terrible to his servants and family, and he was such a well-regarded leader that you can’t even move his bust around now without ...
3
votes
3answers
13k views

Where does “get-go” come from?

Where does the compound word "get-go", as in the phrase "right from the get-go" come from? None of the dictionary definitions I've seen try to explain it, and the Etymology Dictionary doesn't even ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

Is there an idiom or slang for “When you put all of your efforts on something but it doesn't even meet the minimums”?

I was wondering if there are any idioms for situations when you have tried your best for doing something, but it doesn't even meet the minimums or it's too simple and valueless in comparison with ...
2
votes
1answer
139 views

Holy holy=Holy s###?

I thought I heard the store manager (a native English speaker, mid-20's) muttered to himself like "Holy holy." That was when the store was newly opened and was so crowded with lots of customers. He ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

Slang or idiom for someone who wants to gain weight or bulk up

What is a more colourful way of saying someone who wants to gain weight, increase their muscle size by going to the gym? He has been regularly visiting the gym in hopes of ___ Can I say ‘packing ...
5
votes
1answer
197 views

Meaning of “Banksy’s your bag”

In the article about Dismaland there is a paragraph saying: Inside the walls of a derelict seaside swimming resort in Weston-super-Mare, UK, mysterious construction over the last month—...
3
votes
6answers
728 views

Is there a pejorative word for “poor” that can be used in a self-deprecating way?

I was trying to translate Portuguese-language expression pé-rapado into English, which literally means "grated/rasped/shaved foot", but that probably makes no sense in English. I'm not sure those ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Etymology of ~Getting into someone's “kitchen”~

Popular in the 80s and early 90s in Black-American culture, but I doubt it made it into many books so we may be at a loss. The meaning, quite visual, is walking into someone's house and banging all ...
0
votes
2answers
698 views

Usage of the slang “a man Friday” in English conversation

Our Boss was talking with someone and he said, The office clerk typist is our man Friday. Does the Boss mean the clerk typist is the person who he/she trust? And can I use this slang for a woman? ...
2
votes
3answers
7k views

What does this phrase mean: “they just can't keep their hands off the cookie jar”?

What does the following sentence mean? They just can’t keep their hands off the cookie jar (or outta the cookie jar) I came across this sentence in a movie. The context is racism and the social ...
9
votes
1answer
6k views

Source of the phrase “call [somebody] out of name”

I was introduced today to the phrase "Call out of name" as in: She claimed the other girl called her out of name. I had to ask what it meant and the answer was "she called her a bitch". I'm ...
1
vote
3answers
982 views

Slang or idioms for someone in a doomed situation

Are there any idioms, slang or informal expressions for a bad situation that causes trouble for a person and seems impossible to get out of. An example: A guy lost a smartphone with a ton of ...
0
votes
1answer
370 views

Does “sb's ass” have a special meaning here, or just mean sb him/herself?

It may be a stupid question on this site, but it is somewhat bothering me: WARNING: containing strong language. In the movie Pulp Fiction, the character Marsellus Wallace says to Butch: You see, ...
4
votes
1answer
483 views

How to understand “cat's evening wear”?

I really had a difficult time to understand this. It comes from a book I am reading, and it is used to describe a concept the author speaks highly of. Does it mean that something is very special? Or ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Origin of the phrase “because of course it does”

I've been hearing "because of course it/he/she does" a lot recently. I'm assuming this is internet-speak, but maybe it's older? Grateful to anyone who can help pinpoint its origin.
7
votes
1answer
2k views

'Not feeling clever' - how far does this extend?

The other day, when my wife was unwell, I happened to mention to a relative in Norfolk that she wasn't 'feeling too clever'. He instantly knew what I meant. But it made me wonder how far this idiom ...
0
votes
2answers
857 views

“Down in my boots”

May Sarton, an early 20th century poet, wrote in a letter: "Politically I am down in my boots." What could she mean? Angry? Frustrated? Disheartened?
4
votes
4answers
4k views

Is “take a leak” considered only masculine or is it okay if women use it too?

And if it can also be used by women, I still feel vulgar using it.
0
votes
2answers
4k views

The meaning and etymology of the exclamation “Lawdy me!”

What does a speaker mean if he/she exclaims "Lawdy me!"? I noticed this exclamation when I was reading a short story "the Conscience of the Court" by Zora Neale Hurston. There was one brown-skinned ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Is there an idiom about “dying monkey”?

is there an idiom sounding like "monkey dies" or "monkeys died"? What does it mean? I've been wondering since I heard Robert Plant song "Monkey": Tonight you will be mine | Tonight the monkey'll die. ...
0
votes
6answers
9k views

Meaning of the phrase “you're a caution” [closed]

I have encountered the phrase "you're a caution" in a movie in a suggestive, possibly judgmental context. How is this to be understood and where does it come from?
0
votes
5answers
3k views

I'm looking for a slang word or idiom for someone who insists on intruding his presence on two others who would rather be alone

This person usually pretends not to see that he is unwelcome at the moment, but it may be that he just doesn't notice it. Depending on the circumstances, one of the two persons (typically lovers) ...
1
vote
1answer
222 views

“Caldoniafied” In General Use in the 1980s?

I am curious about the word "Caldoniafied" meaning, roughly, hard headed, and presumably coming from the song entitled "Caldonia" ("Caldonia, Caldonia, what makes your big head so hard?". )Louis ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

High and Tight Meaning [closed]

This is a quote from the movie Avatar: "Col. Quaritch: I want this mission high and tight. I wanna be home for dinner." I seem to remember hearing "high and tight" used elsewhere. But I couldn't pin ...
1
vote
1answer
94 views

When did “down” or “down with” in the sense of approval start to be used?

Uses include: "She's down," an absent member of a group is known to think something is a good idea or wants to do it and "I'm down with that," I like that idea, I want to do that, include me in, etc. ...
3
votes
2answers
124 views

Deciphering of William Henley's “Bus-Driver”: put 'a bit on'?

This beautiful sonnet, "Bus-Driver" by William Henley, is studded with idioms, some of which are hard to understand. I've bolded one part (of the two) I don't understand: He’s called The General ...
4
votes
3answers
989 views

Where and when did the phrase “turkey of the year” originate? [closed]

Was it meant to be an objurgation, an insult, a jocose remark, or something else? And does it have the same meaning today as it had then?" Definitions of “turkey” (when used to refer to a person) ...