Questions tagged [hyphenation]

A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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130 views

What is the correct hyphenation of the sequence: "diffusion time dependent"? [duplicate]

The sentence in which I use it similar to the following: From this, it is possible to define a diffusion-time-dependent dimension. I am not sure if the double hyphenation is correct or not, but I ...
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Is the hyphen correct? : The painting is from the 17th century. It's a 17th-century painting [duplicate]

In the following example. Is the lack of a hyphen after 17th correct? The painting is from the 17th century. And in the following example, is the usage of a hyphen correct? It's a 17th-century ...
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42 views

Using multiple hyphens in a phrase [duplicate]

First-time poster. I hope I am posting appropriately and following protocol. I looked at the other sections and this seemed to me to be the correct place. Very quick and simple question. Hyphens are ...
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What would be the correct formatting or rewording of the onomatopoeia "crunch-crunched"?

I am editing a historical fiction novel, and this clause has come up. As the Model T's wheels crunch-crunched their way up the gravel driveway... Is this clause grammatically correct? Should I use ...
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1answer
45 views

Hyphenation usage in US English [duplicate]

I am writing my Ph.D. Thesis in US English and have two questions on hyphenating. Would it be re-entry or reentry? Would it be (re)training or (re-)training? Or would it be retraining at all times? ...
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Hyphenation for a well toasted bagel

I’m curious whether, if one were to order a bagel, well toasted, if the correct hyphenation would be, “Hello, could I please get a well-toasted bagel?” Thanks.
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22 views

Is it acceptable to write "mini-steps" or should it be "mini steps? Can it be "mini-mangoes" or must it be "mini mangoes"? [duplicate]

Is it wrong to use a hyphen after "mini" in the following cases? Why or why not? All I can do is take mini-steps by the day. These mini-mangoes are sweet.
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734 views

When to use hyphen before “themed”

I understand cases where the concept modifying “themed” is a noun: “A Star Wars–themed party” But when the theme is an adjective, which of the following would be correct? “A spooky-themed party” “A ...
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Is there a name for syllables connected with hyphens which might be read as multiple words?

Is there a name for syllables connected with hyphens which can be read as multiple words? For example in one of my songs I have the lines: When you escape from, re-hab-its … more than your soul, cares ...
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45 views

Can 'postsynaptic' be written as 'post-synaptic'?

Under the heading "Excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials" in this article on Khan Academy, the word 'postsynaptic' is written with and without a hyphen. Does this imply that both ...
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Is there a general rule for the usage of hyphens in compound words?

For example for words like in-depth or long-term I would always use a hyphen, and I tend to favor using them in general unless I'm certain there shouldn't be one, but often I find both used for words ...
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Why does English hypenate compounds, while German just mashes them together?

Since starting to learn German, I find myself wanting to use a non-hyphenated word in English, but I always end up adding the hyphen because otherwise it just seems wrong in English. Why is this? Is ...
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Hyphen in consecutive adjectives

Is the hyphen necessary in cases such as: lexical-functional grammar (lexical functional grammar)??
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Hyphenated adjective vs non-hyphenated adjective (when saying the entity has the thing)

I am still a bit confused about what the senses of these two nouns are: 1. White-tiled counter 2. White tiled counter. Does the one with no hyphen actually exist?
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Usage of hyphens - If I am one of the many product owners of a product, would I say part-product-owner?

Or part-product owner? This is in the context of product management, owning a product, its roadmap, schedules, etc delivered to a set of users. I know part-owner is correct, but where does product ...
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1answer
39 views

Difference between medium and long sized hyphen? [duplicate]

Is there any difference between a 'long' and a 'medium' sized hyphen? (I don't think so, but I am just checking to make sure) We all know the very short line, namely, the 'dash': - Then there is ...
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How do I write "something-based", where "something" is more than one word? [duplicate]

I want to write "unsupervised learning based method", where "based" is referring to unsupervised learning. That is, it's (unsupervised learning)-based method, not unsupervised (learning-based methog). ...
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How to hyphenate a whole number and fraction as an adjectival modifier

When a fraction is used as part of a compound adjective it is conventionally hyphenated: e.g. a quarter-million pounds. And when a whole number and a fraction are used together, it is conventional to ...
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"Social-approval seeker" or "social approval-seeker" or "social-approval-seeker"? [duplicate]

What is the most appropriate hyphenation for this term for a person who seeks approval from others? "social-approval seeker" "social approval-seeker" "social-approval-seeker" "social approval seeker" ...
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76 views

Use of hyphen as conjunction

I came across this sentence in my GRE preparation The Bible is fertile ground for exegesis--over the past five centuries there have been as many interpretations as there are pages in the Old ...
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40 views

Hyphenation of frequency-dependently

If, for example, a sound or signal is amplified depending on its frequency, would it be rather correct to write a frequency-dependently amplified tone, a frequency-dependently-amplified tone, or a ...
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35 views

Correct use of hyphens in compound modifiers

The thing with hyphens is, the more I think about whether to use a hyphen, the more I get confused regarding the same. Also, I've observed that each person has a different view when it comes to ...
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Hyphenating proper noun rules

Is there any special rules for hyphenating proper nouns? I've seen information like "never split a proper noun", but in numerous scientific papers these words are hyphenated.
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"end to end" vs "end-to-end"

Is there a correct way to spell this idiom? end to end end-to-end Or is both correct and the latter represents a three-word compound modifier when used as adjective before a noun?
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Should there be hyphenation in words that specify a process or concept or something similar to these?

There are sentences wherein processes, concepts etc. are hyphenated. For eg., progress-enhancement process, authentic-leadership approach etc. I know there is no need of hyphenation in these cases, ...
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157 views

'Machine learning or robotics related' hyphenation?

How should 'Machine learning or robotics related technologies' be hyphenated? Machine learning[en dash] or robotics[hyphen]related technologies?
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407 views

This program is error free. Or error-free?

Which one is correct in American English: This computer program is error-free. This computer program is error free. ... and why? Are, perhaps, both correct? If so, is there any difference in the ...
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1answer
64 views

Should I use a hyphen in "patient tailored" vs "patient-tailored"?

Being a non-native English speaker, I was wondering which is most correct? (1) Patient-tailored staging of xx carcinoma, or (2) Patient tailored staging of xx carcinoma? It is for a scientific ...
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Capitalization and hyphenation of proper noun declensions [duplicate]

I'm transcribing some speech and I came across One of the accusations that certain non-Orthodox Christians level against the Orthodox is that we worship idols. However, I am not certain on how to ...
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2answers
112 views

Spaces around hyphens [closed]

everyone - This question deals with spaces around hyphens, and I think this example may be an exception to the rule. Which is correct: Post- Shoulder Surgery or Post-Shoulder Surgery (note space after ...
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2answers
71 views

Question on spelling "two drink minimum" (two-word adjectives) [duplicate]

Due to an argument, I must ask: Is it "two-drink minimum" or "two drink minimum"? Are both valid? To me, the latter feels wrong because it has neither plural on "drink" nor the dash/hyphen to imply ...
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1answer
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Can the word "something" really not be broken up into any pieces (hyphenation) in British English?

I'm testing this software hyphenator. It seems to be working overall quite well, but one thing struck me as odd, so I'm asking you language experts. The word "something" doesn't get broken up into ...
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540 views

best - fit vs best fit

I'm having a bit of a disagreement about the use of the words "best fit" vs "best - fit" (note the extra spaces suggested). The sentence is "...and I enjoy analysing human behaviour and drivers to ...
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1answer
85 views

Hyphen rule for "thing doers"

I'm confident in my abilities regarding where to place and not place hyphens except in one area: when you have a phrase that consists of a noun and a noun that consists of a verb with -er at the end, ...
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How many hyphens in University of Oxford-based? [duplicate]

If I attach "-based" to a compound noun, should I put a hyphen between every word? As in: I worked for a University of Oxford-based company Or: I worked for a University-of-Oxford-based company ...
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1answer
37 views

hyphenated noun

I am proofreading a text and I am not sure if I should hyphenate the following noun. We are considering limits in which, without going into details, something happens to different objects, A1, A2, A3,...
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1answer
81 views

Is 'a 210-million-people market' correctly written? [duplicate]

Usually I find compound adjectives quite straightforward, but I'm not so sure when it comes to the following: A 210-million-people market So how should I refer to a market 210 million people large ...
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1k views

Game-changer or game changer … Hyphenation

This is my first question. I already did a lot of research but didn't find a specific answer that helps me with this. I know there are three forms (closed, open and hyphenated) in combining words. ...
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1answer
327 views

Hyphen in Anti-malware but not Antivirus [closed]

Why is there a hyphen in Anti-malware but not a hyphen in antivirus. I have found nothing, no matter how far I have searched hence my presence on this site.
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23 views

Hyphenation of -oriented when preceded by two words [duplicate]

Which of these two is correct: (a) I have experience in data science-oriented programming languages. or (b) I have experience in data-science-oriented programming languages.
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134 views

Writing "U-shaped" and "V-shaped" in novel

If you are describing a valley as U-shaped, what is the correct way to write that in a novel. U-shaped U shaped u shaped u-shaped "U" shaped "U"-shaped other variations?
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175 views

Hyphenating words with words in parenthesis

I know we could write between high- and low-yield crop rotation groups but how do we write the same sentence if we have to write between high (CC and CCS) and low (CS and SCS) yield crop ...
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42 views

To hyphenate or not to hyphenate, that is the question I ask of thee

Here is the sentence: The lady's headdress of a hat flew off. Should it be headdress-of-a-hat? thanks
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48 views

False-alarm rate? [duplicate]

When refering to the rate or probability of getting a false alarm from any kind of system for fault detection, I usually see "false alarm rate" writen, but I think it should be "false-alarm rate". Are ...
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1answer
2k views

When to use "once-in-a-lifetime" and when to use "once in a lifetime"?

The first one has - connected and the others do not have, this two seem to have the same meaning but my teacher say not, what is the difference between them?
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3answers
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How should I use hyphenation in the following case?

I am writing an article about continuum mechanics and I would like to understand how to use hyphenation correctly. In continuum mechanics, you have objects called tensors (which are generalizations of ...
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2answers
62 views

high-energy electrons vs. high-energetic electrons

I am writing some text about a population of electrons with very high energies. Which of the following statement is correct (or "better" as compared to the others): [...] a population of high-energy ...
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1answer
64 views

"love- and commitment-minded" hyphenation before "and"

If the meaning I'm aiming for is "love-minded and commitment-minded", but I want the sentence to feel smoother, is the following correct? Those behaviors are hallmarks of narcissists and men who ...
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22 views

Can you hyphenate paste tense verb for typesetting purposes?

One way to deal with line breaks is to have ragged justification (like in MS Word). Another is to vary interword spacing and use hyphens where necessary. I much prefer the latter. I am not 100% ...
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1answer
473 views

Should I use a hyphen with a latin phrase that modifies an adjective that modifies a noun?

I understand that Latin phrases are not normally hyphenated. I also understand that adjective-modifying adverbs normally do receive a hyphen (despite this parenthetically invoked exception). So, which ...

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