Questions tagged [hyphenation]

A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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25 views

Hyphen and en dash usage in adjectives such as "human–animal"

I noticed a possible editorial error in Nature magazine concerning this. These two headlines here and here use en dashes and hyphens for the adjectives "human–animal" and "human-animal&...
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What is the effect of using dashes between each word in a sentence?

In The Bluest Eye, there is a quote: Grown people frowned and fussed: 'You-don’t-know- how-to-take-care-of-nothing. I-never-had-a-baby-doll-in-my-whole-life-and-used-to-cry-my-eyes-out-for-them. Now-...
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Hyphenating measurements in case of a fraction

I am now quite comfortable with the rules of hyphenating measurements (For example, 5-foot-long rod, 7-inch-long handle, etc.) However, what is the rule for hyphenation if the number is a fraction. ...
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479 views

Is "corrosion resistant material" incorrect?

When people say They made the material corrosion resistant. they mean corrosion resistant as an adjective. The word corrosion is only a noun, and resistant is both an adjective and a noun. But in ...
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Hyphens and pronoun: Markov chain model vs Markov-chain model [duplicate]

Trying to figure out hyphen rules, and they mostly seem easy to follow. However, the main thing throwing me off is whether or not to hyphenate two words preceding a noun when one of the words is a ...
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Does a noun phrase used as an adjective require a hyphen? [duplicate]

I've got this phrase: On a crisp, hot-chocolate afternoon. I'm not sure if hot chocolate requires a hyphen. It would add clarity (a hot-chocolate afternoon, as opposed to a hot and chocolate afternoon)...
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N-times differentiable function should go with hyphen? [duplicate]

Suppose that I would like to say "Let f(x) be an N-times differentiable function." Should it be "N-times" or "N times", and why?
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Should proper nouns be hyphenated if used as compound adjectives?

Which of the following two is correct, if any? I watched a Six Nations rugby match. I watched a Six-Nations rugby match. Is there a general rule for the use of hyphens in compound adjectives when ...
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Should I use a hyphen with a phrase involving "then"?

In this sentence: "before migrating to lower SoHo, and the then still fringe neighborhood of Chelsea," I feel like "then-still" should be hyphenated, but I can't find a rule in the Chicago Manual of ...
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Pre-construction and post construction [duplicate]

I have been struggling for a definitive answer about the use of a hyphen specifically in pre-construction and post construction. We sometimes write preconstruction and sometimes pre-construction. ...
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51 views

Where to put a hyphen when there's an abbreviation in the middle?

Ethiopia wants African Union (AU) mediated negotiations on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD). Using AP style. You want a hyphen in front of mediated. What is the correct way?
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A What-Do-You-Call-It question

In a book, there is this sentence: "My mom would have put this in her What-Have-You-Done-Now? File, but it was SOS to me." -p 19, The SOS File, Betsy Byars. Is there a name for this kind of ...
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To hyphenate or not?

As a non-native speaker of English and an engineer by training, I always get confused about hyphenation and almost always end up referring to Google every time I need to make that decision. Does ...
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What would be the correct spelling/hyphenation for "upper mid-tier"?

The phrase is for referring to a noun "company" such as in the sentence: "I bought the upper mid-tier company". (Meaning a company that is middle tier but slightly higher and not ...
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Is the hyphen in the adjective phrase “just-[past participle]” mandatory?

I came across the following sentence: The target can be resolved through one of the just mentioned record types. I believe it should have been written as “… just-mentioned record types”, with a ...
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A four- or five-time(s)-a-year indulgence

Page 693 of Garner's Modern English reads When two phrasal adjectives have a common element at the end, and this ending portion appears only with the second phrase, insert a suspensive hyphen after ...
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Hyphenation of compound or phrasal adjectives

The following usage of hyphenation all seems correct to me, but I wanted verification that this is correct, since use of hyphenation in compound adjectives doesn't seem to commonly follow this pattern....
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Does one hyphenate height when given in feet and inches?

In a work of fiction I'm writing, I'm using the colloquial phrase five-one to refer to someone's height. Should that be hyphenated as five-one, or should it just be written woth a space separating the ...
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"Personal Use Program" or "Personal-Use Program"?

Help me settle a discussion on this topic. Everywhere I look, within my company's internal documents as well as documents from other companies, a "personal use" program is not hyphenated. A colleague ...
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How should a multiple-word noun be punctuated within a compound adjective? [duplicate]

I would like to use a noun made of multiple words (like particle board, Mount Everest, or windscreen wiper) in a compound adjective with a hyphen. But I don't know how to hyphenate such a composition....
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"quantum mechanical" vs "quantum-mechanical" [duplicate]

I'm currently writing a short report, where one (sub-)chapter heading reads: The quantum(-)mechanical basics I am now wondering, whether it is preferable with or without the hyphen. When googling ...
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How do you spell wifi / Wi-Fi / WiFi?

This is probably related to whether one should capitalize Internet or not. I am looking for the correct spelling of wifi when referring to a wireless connection to the Internet. I want to tell the ...
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71 views

Should I use hyphenation on compounds consisting of three nouns?

In our software, we extract/detect information from/on images, e.g., face features and hand gestures. When referring to these processes, should it be...? "face feature extraction" and "...
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Should I hyphenate "rational expectations" when used as an adjective? [closed]

Should a hyphen be used between "rational" and "expectations" in phrases like "rational expectations equilibrium" or "rational expectations condition" in an ...
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Do these phrases require hyphens? "mock-cried" vs "mock cried" [duplicate]

Should the following sentences be hyphenated? I mock cried into his shoulder. vs. I mock-cried into his shoulder. He smiled at me with his old man charm. vs. He smiled at me with his old man-charm.
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Why is there not a hyphen between "natural" and "language" in the phrase "natural language processing"?

Natural language processing is a field of AI that deals with tasks related to processing natural languages such as English and Spanish, in order to understand and extract data from them. Based on my ...
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Hyphenated Word Split Between Pages?

I am currently proofreading a typeset document that's automatically hyphenated "client" to justify a line. The bottom of one page has "cli-", and then, after a page turn, "-...
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Anti followed by phrase, usage of hyphen

See this headline Anti-police brutality march declared illegal, broken up I felt they should have written anti police-brutality or anti-police-brutality. Which one is more proper? Edit: It is ...
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"Stockmarkets" vs. "stock markets"

I am having trouble with the difference between stockmarkets and stock markets — or should it be stock-markets? In some articles it is introduced as stockmarkets, but that term is not found in ...
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I need to use two compound words in a sentence and their first component is the same. Do I start the second word with a hyphen? [duplicate]

I need to write the following sentence in a description of a book's binding: "Printer's wrappers, housed in a cloth-backed and cloth-edged card slipcase." This seems clunky to me, and I ...
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2k views

Co-working or Coworking?

I'm proofreading a text for the magazine, and came across coworking. I prefer to spell it co-working with a hyphen -. I've looked on Ngrams, wikipedia, and several dictionaries, and as usual with ...
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601 views

Is half-in half-out hyphenated?

Do you hyphenate half-in half-out? He was half-in half-out. (of the window). Or half in, half out? Sheesh, nothing coming up on google. Any ideas/help please?
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How can you determine whether a word with the pseudo- prefix should be hyphenated? [duplicate]

I am in a bit of a quandary over conflicting results in dictionary entries about the inclusion of a hyphen in some of the words containing the pseudo- prefix. An example of one of these words is ...
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Use of hyphens in acronyms

PTP-SD is a type of algorithm. PTP stands for "probabilistic tree pruning" SD stands for "sphere decoding" PTP-SD is a type of algorithm that uses PTP with SD. My question is about the use of the ...
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Prefixes hyphenated or spaced

As a professional typographer and proofreader (I know; rare and disappearing breeds, especially for being both at the same time! And yes, I’m also a graphic designer), I tend to follow what are called ...
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Regarding usage of hyphens for numbers with preposition

Here are few examples of hyphen usage I found (albeit on internet) for numbers with preposition in between. At the same time I find these without hyphens in similar usage. #-for-# [Barry] "...
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'Extra-high-voltage grid' or 'extra-high voltage grid'?

I've seen both used interchangeably, and can't decide which is best. Given that both adjectives modify the noun, should two hyphens not be used? Thanks!
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7k views

"something come something", or foo-come-bar

Is the bold construct below valid? Does it have a name? What sort of punctuation would you use for it? Fnord, the something-come-such-and-so, was under development for a year or so. It suffered a ...
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Hyphenation of compound adjective as object complement

Consider these three cases: Here is the up-to-date information. Mark this information up-to-date. This information is up to date. Those are spelled the ways that feel correct to me, but I'm not ...
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Child-murderer or child murderer?

During an episode of Archer, he criticized a journalist's grammar for her misuse of the word 'child-murderer'. She meant one who murders children, and Archer argued in using the hyphenated form, she ...
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I see lots of examples of unnecessary hyphenation in phrases like "when she was five-years-old", is there a change in usage, or is it technology?

Obviously, at least to me as a native speaker, "when she was five years old" doesn't need any hyphens, any more than "when she was five feet tall" or "when she had long black ...
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Taken from UK Teachers' Standards: "Plan and teach well structured lessons" [duplicate]

The UK Teachers' Standards ask teachers to 'take responsibility for promoting... the correct use of standard English', and six lines later we find the heading, 'Plan and teach well structured lessons' ...
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How would one correctly place punctuation marks in this sentence?

Moth-like, the people buzzed about: walking, driving, directing— each to their own light. I'm not sure whether each comma, colon, dash and hyphen are used correctly here. Please help! Also, this ...
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Hyphens for compound range in "He will be at the job for one to two years"?

Came across something written like "He will be at the job for two to three years." A colleague suggested it should be "two-to-three years." I disagreed. I see the rationale for a ...
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What is the correct grammar for "a days-long wait"

Surely there's a better way; something instantaneous that doesn't involve a days-long wait? Is the grammar above correct? Particularly, should 'days-long' be hyphenated, and should it contain a ...
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Is it makeup or make-up or make up?

If you take a makeup test, is it correct to call it a makeup, make up, or make-up test? I know that makeup is also what some people put on their faces to look different. I think that make-up is what ...
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How to hyphenate “small-gap short-period long devices”?

I would like to use a compound adjective for the word "devices", but I don't know how to place the hyphen. Does small-gap short-period long devices sound correct?
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71 views

Cosmetics: Make up, make-up, or makeup? [closed]

When referring to cosmetics, which is correct? Make up, make-up, or makeup? And does it matter in case of a noun, verb, adjective? The actor playing Frankenstein's monster wore 6 pounds of [makeup | ...
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581 views

How should "makeup" be written in BrEng?

By "makeup", I mean cosmetics, as in lipstick, foundation, eyeliner, etc. My assumption is that it should be written as "makeup", but others have suggested "make up" or "make-up". In case there are ...
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Is a lengthy combination of words with hyphens like “the worst not-technically-in-a-recession year in American history” a new fashion of writing?

I found a hyphenated word , “not-technically–in-a-recession” in the sentence of September 28 New York Times’ article titled “Why Obama Is Winning,” written by co-ed columnist, Ross Douthat. It reads: ...

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