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A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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In the following sentence , should locally owned have a hyphen?

In the following sentence , should locally owned have a hyphen? A fun, causal way to sample the sights, stories and flavors of a cross-section of locally owned restaurants.
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33 views

Should I use a hyphen with a phrase involving “then”?

In this sentence: "before migrating to lower SoHo, and the then still fringe neighborhood of Chelsea," I feel like "then-still" should be hyphenated, but I can't find a rule in the Chicago Manual of ...
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3answers
85 views

Should I use a hyphen, an en dash, or an em dash to define or introduce a word? [closed]

I have looked up online and studied usages for the hyphen, en dash, and em dash. I still haven't found an answer if I can define words with a dash in English. The backstory on dashes defining ...
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3answers
369 views

Hyphenation of “second most northerly” [on hold]

I've changed my mind a number of times about which of these variants works best: the second most northerly coffee shop in Seattle the second-most-northerly coffee shop in Seattle the second-...
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0answers
25 views

Can “fully-personalized” be hyphenated? [duplicate]

I'm wondering whether an adverb can be hyphenated, such as in "fully-personalized service".
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3answers
57 views

How would one correctly place punctuation marks in this sentence?

Moth-like, the people buzzed about: walking, driving, directing— each to their own light. I'm not sure whether each comma, colon, dash and hyphen are used correctly here. Please help! Also, this ...
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2answers
37 views

Adverb versus Adjective in -minded people

I am currently running for the Board of Education in my little town and am working on my candidate statement for the election handbook that the Department of Elections produces. I sent what I had to ...
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1answer
35 views

How to hyphenate (divide at the end of a line) the word “configurable”?

Just as the heading says: How do we hyphenate (in the sense of: divide at the end of a line) the word configurable? I was quite surprised that Merriam-Webster doesn't know that word. The Oxford ...
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0answers
52 views

Hyphenation (end-of-line division) of “Germany” and some other common words

I am currently trying to build a database of English words and their hyphenations (end-of-line divisions) (en-US, if it matters), and thereby have come across some words which I have found ...
0
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1answer
48 views

non taxable vs non-taxable [duplicate]

Is the correct usage of the non-taxable or nontaxable? I'm not sure what the correct use is. I want to say that it is with the hyphen however it ha become a debate that this could be incorrect.
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2answers
26 views

How to hyphenate “multi-day long”

I am describing an event that lasts for more than 68 continuous hours, and I want to describe it as a "multi-day long" event, but I don't know where to put the hypen(s) in that phrase.
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1answer
39 views

hyphenation of compound adjectives [closed]

Proofreading a friend's work, I came across the following phrase: [teachers and students] work collaboratively to change long held, potentially incorrect and deeply believed views Now, while I'm ...
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1answer
40 views

Title case; confused if I have to capitalize this word after a hyphen

I'm confused when I have to capitalize a word after a hyphen. I did google around, but I'm still confused when I do or do not have to capitalize it. I have 'Distance-Related Effects'. I think '...
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2answers
47 views

Nonionic or non-ionic? [closed]

which is more correct or more frequently used? Nonionic or non-ionic (polymers)? It´s for an academic presentation.
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1answer
41 views

Why does google prefer not to use hyphen? [Hyphen vs No Hyphen] [closed]

One of the things that keeps bothering me while using Google's products such as Google Docs, Google Slides, or search engine is the red line under words that include hyphen (e.g. co-operate, broken-...
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1answer
24 views

Is “stress test” hyphenated when an adjective?

My question is when "stress test" is an adjective is it hyphenated?
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1answer
111 views

time-consuming vs time consuming?

Should the phrase time consuming hyphenated or not? In the context I'm using it in, the hyphen seems right. "Painting the walls with chalkboard paint and providing chalk allows customers to make ...
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1answer
42 views

How do I correctly hyphenate “thousands of years long”?

I want to refer to a few events that all last thousands of years. My understanding is that if I use "thousands of year-long events", that means there are thousands of events; and each one of them are ...
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2answers
138 views

What should I use when introducing dialogue, hyphens, en-dashes or em-dashes? [closed]

I have always use the hyphen when introducing dialogue. -I love skating, but I'm not very good at it. But I have recently been educated about the existence and use of en/em dashes. Now, I think I ...
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0answers
33 views

“fresh stored produce” vs. “fresh-stored produce”

Do you say fresh stored produce or fresh-stored produce? I am not talking about 'newly stored' but 'stored in a way to keep its freshness'. I understand an adjective (fresh) can be used in a place ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Compound Adjectives: Usage after “is” / Usage with noun

I'm currently writing a text in which I have some object called a graph, which has the attribute of being planar in a special way, namely in the multi-level way. I'm pretty certain that I should call ...
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0answers
26 views

Which is correct, “antidemocratic” or “anti-democratic”?

Does this word need a hyphen (-)? Most of the online dictionaries don't use the hyphen but almost all of the articles use it in which I feel confused. Please do enlighten me, thanks!
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0answers
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Must or should you use a hyphen in *Turing-complete* and *Turing-completeness?* [duplicate]

Here's quite a good general answer of when and how to hyphenate. This makes me believe, that Turing-complete is correct, even though most people are not writing it this way. However, Turing-...
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2answers
34 views

I tend to overuse the hyphen as a pause, and would appreciate some feedback on this [duplicate]

An example of the way I tend to use the hyphen would be: Some people are genetically predisposed to build muscle - I am not one of them. I usually do this more often when I am in a hurry. Still, I ...
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1answer
528 views

Non-existing or nonexisting [closed]

What is correct in English, non-existing or nonexisting? Searching sources on Google doesn't help much as both variants are widely present there. Onelook Dictionary Search doesn't show much about ...
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1answer
52 views

Should “in-cabin” be hyphenated in “the dogs must ride in-cabin on the airplane”? [duplicate]

Would the term in-cabin be hyphenated or not? As in, the dogs must ride in-cabin on the airplane.
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0answers
26 views

How hyphenation line break work? [duplicate]

I see this on one of my practice sheet that I need to complete, I don't really understand how to do it so I need your help
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2answers
80 views

Suspended hyphen in“ever-expanding and contracting gulf”?

My hunch is a suspended hyphen is not needed preceding the second word (contracting), but the writer queried this and I'm not sure. (We go by the Chicago Manual of Style but I can't find an example ...
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0answers
19 views

How do I hyphenate two locations? [duplicate]

I'm confused about how to hyphenate two locations in a single sentence. For instance: "A New York and London-based agency focused on making brands heard." or "A New York- and London-based agency ...
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2answers
252 views

How old is the practice of hyphenating compound adjectives?

In Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part One at 1.3.230 Hotspur refers to Hal contemptuously as that same sword-and-buckler Prince of Wales At Internet Shakespeare Editions the “Modern” ...
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2answers
49 views

Using the structure “noun-adjective” as a noun (e.g. “innovation-inclined”)

Is it correct to use the structure noun + hyphen + adjective as a noun? For example, can you say "We innovation-inclined tend to act quickly" or "The technology-inclined always update their devices ...
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1answer
56 views

Hyphen in compound word?

Better with or without hyphen? Dollar-quotes Use dollar-quoted strings to simplify! Use dollar-quoting to simplify! Does it matter whether the second part is another noun? And does it make a ...
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1answer
175 views

Should you hyphenate 'one hour session'?

The phrase two-hour session should have a hyphen, because you are making a singular of what is actually plural, i.e. two hours. But what about a one hour session? Should that be 'one-hour session'?
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1answer
71 views

Implying the idiom “just shy of (something)” with hyphenation

Since, I am constantly redirected to this site for my many, many questions and I am an aspiring author, I shall make my first post a query. When using the idiom "just shy of (something)" would it be ...
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0answers
23 views

How to use hyphens appropriately when listing multiple unhyphenated terms? [duplicate]

Very similiar to this question, but with an important difference: If two words share the same end, but do not contain a hyphen, can I also avoid repeating their ends when listing the words? How ...
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1answer
41 views

Would “metaphor use” be hyphenated? [closed]

As in "metaphor-use" versus "metaphor use".
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0answers
48 views

Spelling multiplayer vs. multi-player [duplicate]

English adjectives tend to compound using hyphens (-), whereas nouns usually compound simply by putting two words together: “a mind-blowing sailboat”. Then why is there a “multiplayer game” and not “...
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35 views

Would “lady-lover” be hyphenated?

When used to mean "someone who loves ladies", rather than a female lover.
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1answer
38 views

Hyphenation of four-word sequence with attributive adjectives

In a particular cognitive task, research subjects are asked to refrain from pressing a button in response to an auditory cue, called a “stop signal.” The time required by the participant’s brain to ...
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304 views

upside down or upside-down

In this sentence, I am struggling to either take out or keep in the hyphen between upside-down. Is it an adjective in it's position? If so, then I understand it is to be hyphenated. The woman who ...
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0answers
25 views

What word is used to indicate a repetition of the action of cross-referencing

So MSWord has this bug in its cross-referencing system such that it occasionally throws in the line before, if it is in the same format as the caption. I was discussing this with an editor of a ...
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1answer
50 views

Is breadlike a word? Should it have a hyphen? [closed]

I'm editing a recipe and one step says that the mixture should resemble a "breadlike dough". This word looks fine to me but it keeps getting flagged up by spell check. Is it a real word? "Bread-like" ...
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1answer
116 views

How to hyphenate a phrasal adjective: PCI-compliant

I have a phrase I use often in my work, but I'm not sure if I'm hyphenating it correctly. As it stands, I've been writing it like this: The PCI-compliant payment gateway... I think PCI-compliant is a ...
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1answer
207 views

Why is “well-known” hyphenated? [duplicate]

Well is adverb and known is adjective. As far as I know, it should not be hyphenated. For example: clearly impossible task, extremely powerful processor.
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349 views

Is “ever so slight” correct and is this experession regarded as colloquial?

I am a non-native English speaker and I have questions regarding the use of "ever so slightly". First of all, I would like to use it as an adjective in a scientific manuscript. An example sentence is: ...
2
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1answer
78 views

Hyphenating multi-word phrases [duplicate]

I'm trying to figure out whether or not to hyphenate a new medical-related phrase, "post birth control syndrome." I know Post-traumatic Stress Disorder is hyphenated, but that seems to make sense ...
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0answers
51 views

hyphen in adjectives with mathematical symbols

In mathematics and physics (and other fields of science), it is quite common to use symbols in lieu of names. For instance an object can have a symmetry G, i.e. the name of the symmetry is G. I am ...
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1answer
44 views

Right to left or right-to-left? [closed]

Which is right? right to left or right-to-left? The same question goes for left to right and left-to-right Can't find this in any dictionary I use. Context: the way the text is written is usually ...
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1answer
48 views

Hyphenation in compounds with abbreviation remarks

So far I understood, that hyphenation should aid readability. Examples [1, 2]: North America-based company A Gaussian mixture model-based approach We propose spherical Gaussian-based ...
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2answers
57 views

What is the exact difference between “called” and “so-called”? [closed]

Actually, in English to Korean dictionary, both of "called" and "so-called" have the same meaning. In many examples of the dictionary, "so-called" is used as adjective rather than past-particle, i.e.,...