Questions tagged [hyphenation]

A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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Can 'postsynaptic' be written as 'post-synaptic'?

Under the heading "Excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials" in this article on Khan Academy, the word 'postsynaptic' is written with and without a hyphen. Does this imply that both ...
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Is there a general rule for the usage of hyphens in compound words?

For example for words like in-depth or long-term I would always use a hyphen, and I tend to favor using them in general unless I'm certain there shouldn't be one, but often I find both used for words ...
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Why does English hypenate compounds, while German just mashes them together?

Since starting to learn German, I find myself wanting to use a non-hyphenated word in English, but I always end up adding the hyphen because otherwise it just seems wrong in English. Why is this? Is ...
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Hyphen in consecutive adjectives

Is the hyphen necessary in cases such as: lexical-functional grammar (lexical functional grammar)??
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Hyphenated adjective vs non-hyphenated adjective (when saying the entity has the thing)

I am still a bit confused about what the senses of these two nouns are: 1. White-tiled counter 2. White tiled counter. Does the one with no hyphen actually exist?
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Usage of hyphens - If I am one of the many product owners of a product, would I say part-product-owner?

Or part-product owner? This is in the context of product management, owning a product, its roadmap, schedules, etc delivered to a set of users. I know part-owner is correct, but where does product ...
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Difference between medium and long sized hyphen? [duplicate]

Is there any difference between a 'long' and a 'medium' sized hyphen? (I don't think so, but I am just checking to make sure) We all know the very short line, namely, the 'dash': - Then there is ...
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full time or full-time, what is the rule here [duplicate]

It is a sentence completion question from IELTS. I got it wrong because I didn't have the hyphen. I want to know what is the general rule here. I only found This pagesays that :generally, you need the ...
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How do I write “something-based”, where “something” is more than one word? [duplicate]

I want to write "unsupervised learning based method", where "based" is referring to unsupervised learning. That is, it's (unsupervised learning)-based method, not unsupervised (learning-based methog). ...
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How to hyphenate a whole number and fraction as an adjectival modifier

When a fraction is used as part of a compound adjective it is conventionally hyphenated: e.g. a quarter-million pounds. And when a whole number and a fraction are used together, it is conventional to ...
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“Social-approval seeker” or “social approval-seeker” or “social-approval-seeker”? [duplicate]

What is the most appropriate hyphenation for this term for a person who seeks approval from others? "social-approval seeker" "social approval-seeker" "social-approval-seeker" "social approval seeker" ...
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Use of hyphen as conjunction

I came across this sentence in my GRE preparation The Bible is fertile ground for exegesis--over the past five centuries there have been as many interpretations as there are pages in the Old ...
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Hyphenation of frequency-dependently

If, for example, a sound or signal is amplified depending on its frequency, would it be rather correct to write a frequency-dependently amplified tone, a frequency-dependently-amplified tone, or a ...
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Correct use of hyphens in compound modifiers

The thing with hyphens is, the more I think about whether to use a hyphen, the more I get confused regarding the same. Also, I've observed that each person has a different view when it comes to ...
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Hyphenating proper noun rules

Is there any special rules for hyphenating proper nouns? I've seen information like "never split a proper noun", but in numerous scientific papers these words are hyphenated.
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“end to end” vs “end-to-end”

Is there a correct way to spell this idiom? end to end end-to-end Or is both correct and the latter represents a three-word compound modifier when used as adjective before a noun?
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Should there be hyphenation in words that specify a process or concept or something similar to these?

There are sentences wherein processes, concepts etc. are hyphenated. For eg., progress-enhancement process, authentic-leadership approach etc. I know there is no need of hyphenation in these cases, ...
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'Machine learning or robotics related' hyphenation?

How should 'Machine learning or robotics related technologies' be hyphenated? Machine learning[en dash] or robotics[hyphen]related technologies?
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Colon, semicolon, or em-dash?

First Question: In Elisa’s daily life, she is mainly a housewife--meaning that she cooks, cleans, does the dishes, and more. Second Question: The tinker starts talking about what it is like sleeping ...
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Hyphenation and Quotes

If a book has the following passage "the red c-ar ran the yello-w light" and I want to use this passage in my paper, how do I go about removing the hyphenation? Do I write "X source says 'the red c[]...
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This program is error free. Or error-free?

Which one is correct in American English: This computer program is error-free. This computer program is error free. ... and why? Are, perhaps, both correct? If so, is there any difference in the ...
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Should I use a hyphen in “patient tailored” vs “patient-tailored”?

Being a non-native English speaker, I was wondering which is most correct? (1) Patient-tailored staging of xx carcinoma, or (2) Patient tailored staging of xx carcinoma? It is for a scientific ...
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Capitalization and hyphenation of proper noun declensions [duplicate]

I'm transcribing some speech and I came across One of the accusations that certain non-Orthodox Christians level against the Orthodox is that we worship idols. However, I am not certain on how to ...
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Spaces around hyphens [closed]

everyone - This question deals with spaces around hyphens, and I think this example may be an exception to the rule. Which is correct: Post- Shoulder Surgery or Post-Shoulder Surgery (note space after ...
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Question on spelling “two drink minimum” (two-word adjectives) [duplicate]

Due to an argument, I must ask: Is it "two-drink minimum" or "two drink minimum"? Are both valid? To me, the latter feels wrong because it has neither plural on "drink" nor the dash/hyphen to imply ...
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Using a hyphen versus a double hyphen versus a colon to explain something [duplicate]

To give evidence for or to elaborate an opinion, when should one use a hyphen versus a double hyphen versus a colon? XYZ seems like a good movie - it has a 4.35 rating. XYZ seems like a good movie -- ...
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Can the word “something” really not be broken up into any pieces (hyphenation) in British English?

I'm testing this software hyphenator. It seems to be working overall quite well, but one thing struck me as odd, so I'm asking you language experts. The word "something" doesn't get broken up into ...
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best - fit vs best fit

I'm having a bit of a disagreement about the use of the words "best fit" vs "best - fit" (note the extra spaces suggested). The sentence is "...and I enjoy analysing human behaviour and drivers to ...
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Hyphen rule for “thing doers”

I'm confident in my abilities regarding where to place and not place hyphens except in one area: when you have a phrase that consists of a noun and a noun that consists of a verb with -er at the end, ...
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How many hyphens in University of Oxford-based? [duplicate]

If I attach "-based" to a compound noun, should I put a hyphen between every word? As in: I worked for a University of Oxford-based company Or: I worked for a University-of-Oxford-based company ...
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hyphenated noun

I am proofreading a text and I am not sure if I should hyphenate the following noun. We are considering limits in which, without going into details, something happens to different objects, A1, A2, A3,...
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Is 'a 210-million-people market' correctly written? [duplicate]

Usually I find compound adjectives quite straightforward, but I'm not so sure when it comes to the following: A 210-million-people market So how should I refer to a market 210 million people large ...
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Game-changer or game changer … Hyphenation

This is my first question. I already did a lot of research but didn't find a specific answer that helps me with this. I know there are three forms (closed, open and hyphenated) in combining words. ...
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Hyphen in Anti-malware but not Antivirus [closed]

Why is there a hyphen in Anti-malware but not a hyphen in antivirus. I have found nothing, no matter how far I have searched hence my presence on this site.
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Hyphenation of -oriented when preceded by two words [duplicate]

Which of these two is correct: (a) I have experience in data science-oriented programming languages. or (b) I have experience in data-science-oriented programming languages.
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Writing “U-shaped” and “V-shaped” in novel

If you are describing a valley as U-shaped, what is the correct way to write that in a novel. U-shaped U shaped u shaped u-shaped "U" shaped "U"-shaped other variations?
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Hyphenating words with words in parenthesis

I know we could write between high- and low-yield crop rotation groups but how do we write the same sentence if we have to write between high (CC and CCS) and low (CS and SCS) yield crop ...
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To hyphenate or not to hyphenate, that is the question I ask of thee

Here is the sentence: The lady's headdress of a hat flew off. Should it be headdress-of-a-hat? thanks
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False-alarm rate? [duplicate]

When refering to the rate or probability of getting a false alarm from any kind of system for fault detection, I usually see "false alarm rate" writen, but I think it should be "false-alarm rate". Are ...
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When to use “once-in-a-lifetime” and when to use “once in a lifetime”?

The first one has - connected and the others do not have, this two seem to have the same meaning but my teacher say not, what is the difference between them?
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How should I use hyphenation in the following case?

I am writing an article about continuum mechanics and I would like to understand how to use hyphenation correctly. In continuum mechanics, you have objects called tensors (which are generalizations of ...
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high-energy electrons vs. high-energetic electrons

I am writing some text about a population of electrons with very high energies. Which of the following statement is correct (or "better" as compared to the others): [...] a population of high-energy ...
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“love- and commitment-minded” hyphenation before “and”

If the meaning I'm aiming for is "love-minded and commitment-minded", but I want the sentence to feel smoother, is the following correct? Those behaviors are hallmarks of narcissists and men who ...
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Can you hyphenate paste tense verb for typesetting purposes?

One way to deal with line breaks is to have ragged justification (like in MS Word). Another is to vary interword spacing and use hyphens where necessary. I much prefer the latter. I am not 100% ...
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Should I use a hyphen with a latin phrase that modifies an adjective that modifies a noun?

I understand that Latin phrases are not normally hyphenated. I also understand that adjective-modifying adverbs normally do receive a hyphen (despite this parenthetically invoked exception). So, which ...
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Macroregional or Macro-Regional?

I have searched for the correct spelling of "macroregional / macro-regional" on the Internet, but there are used both variants (sometimes even on the same website). Wiktionary spells it as "...
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Persistently low lab values vs persistent low lab values?

I cannot seem to find the best way to express this, both in terms of grammar and "correct sounding" feel to English/American readers (which I am not). So, this is the scenario: the serum ...
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Hyphenate wrap-around porch? [duplicate]

I do not know if it is correct to use a hyphen between the words wrap, and around, in describing a porch that wraps around a house.
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Do the words “en dash” and “em dash” require a hyphen? [duplicate]

I have seen the compound words "en dash" and "em dash" sometimes appear with a hyphen ("en-dash") and sometimes without. Are both the hyphenated and the unhyphenated forms correct?
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Hyphen or no hyphen? [duplicate]

Should I say 'randomly-projected data' or randomly projected data? The randomly refers to the projection itself. The projections are random and the data is projected.

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