Questions tagged [hyphenation]

A hyphen is a symbol used to join two words or two syllables of a single word together. It is not to be confused with dashes or the minus symbol, as these are all longer than the hyphen and serve different purposes in language.

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Using a hyphen versus a double hyphen versus a colon to explain something [duplicate]

To give evidence for or to elaborate an opinion, when should one use a hyphen versus a double hyphen versus a colon? XYZ seems like a good movie - it has a 4.35 rating. XYZ seems like a good ...
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20 views

Should it be “multi-select” or “multiselect”? [closed]

The context is the form element on a Web page, where users select one or more options from a list before submitting a form. Should there be a hyphen or not? And can this rule be applied to similar ...
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63 views

Can the word “something” really not be broken up into any pieces (hyphenation) in British English?

I'm testing this software hyphenator. It seems to be working overall quite well, but one thing struck me as odd, so I'm asking you language experts. The word "something" doesn't get broken up into ...
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24 views

best - fit vs best fit

I'm having a bit of a disagreement about the use of the words "best fit" vs "best - fit" (note the extra spaces suggested). The sentence is "...and I enjoy analysing human behaviour and drivers to ...
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Is it grammatically correct to hyphenate “simplest-ever” before other adjectives that precede a noun?

I am writing a phrase that needs to be short because of limited space. It needs to be about 60 characters with spaces. It does not need to be a complete sentence. Let's say I'm writing this about a ...
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32 views

Hyphen rule for “thing doers”

I'm confident in my abilities regarding where to place and not place hyphens except in one area: when you have a phrase that consists of a noun and a noun that consists of a verb with -er at the end, ...
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26 views

Hyphens in time-range modifiers

I’m told that it’s never wrong to hyphenate compound modifiers. For a time range, are the hyphens correct below? He worked the 5 a.m.-to-1 p.m. shift. (OK?) Alternative (with en-dash): He ...
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33 views

How many hyphens in University of Oxford-based? [duplicate]

If I attach "-based" to a compound noun, should I put a hyphen between every word? As in: I worked for a University of Oxford-based company Or: I worked for a University-of-Oxford-based company ...
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19 views

Dash or hyphen in an abbreviation?

For example if I have an abbreviation: Taylor's 4th expansion (Taylor-4) Should I use Taylor–4 or Taylor-4, in this case?
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31 views

hyphenated noun

I am proofreading a text and I am not sure if I should hyphenate the following noun. We are considering limits in which, without going into details, something happens to different objects, A1, A2, A3,...
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77 views

Is 'a 210-million-people market' correctly written? [duplicate]

Usually I find compound adjectives quite straightforward, but I'm not so sure when it comes to the following: A 210-million-people market So how should I refer to a market 210 million people large ...
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49 views

Game-changer or game changer … Hyphenation

This is my first question. I already did a lot of research but didn't find a specific answer that helps me with this. I know there are three forms (closed, open and hyphenated) in combining words. ...
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1answer
64 views

Hyphen in Anti-malware but not Antivirus [closed]

Why is there a hyphen in Anti-malware but not a hyphen in antivirus. I have found nothing, no matter how far I have searched hence my presence on this site.
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20 views

Hyphenation of -oriented when preceded by two words [duplicate]

Which of these two is correct: (a) I have experience in data science-oriented programming languages. or (b) I have experience in data-science-oriented programming languages.
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67 views

Writing “U-shaped” and “V-shaped” in novel

If you are describing a valley as U-shaped, what is the correct way to write that in a novel. U-shaped U shaped u shaped u-shaped "U" shaped "U"-shaped other variations?
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2answers
70 views

Hyphenating words with words in parenthesis

I know we could write between high- and low-yield crop rotation groups but how do we write the same sentence if we have to write between high (CC and CCS) and low (CS and SCS) yield crop ...
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32 views

To hyphenate or not to hyphenate, that is the question I ask of thee

Here is the sentence: The lady's headdress of a hat flew off. Should it be headdress-of-a-hat? thanks
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38 views

False-alarm rate? [duplicate]

When refering to the rate or probability of getting a false alarm from any kind of system for fault detection, I usually see "false alarm rate" writen, but I think it should be "false-alarm rate". Are ...
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1answer
80 views

When to use “once-in-a-lifetime” and when to use “once in a lifetime”?

The first one has - connected and the others do not have, this two seem to have the same meaning but my teacher say not, what is the difference between them?
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3answers
38 views

How should I use hyphenation in the following case?

I am writing an article about continuum mechanics and I would like to understand how to use hyphenation correctly. In continuum mechanics, you have objects called tensors (which are generalizations of ...
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2answers
37 views

high-energy electrons vs. high-energetic electrons

I am writing some text about a population of electrons with very high energies. Which of the following statement is correct (or "better" as compared to the others): [...] a population of high-energy ...
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1answer
34 views

“love- and commitment-minded” hyphenation before “and”

If the meaning I'm aiming for is "love-minded and commitment-minded", but I want the sentence to feel smoother, is the following correct? Those behaviors are hallmarks of narcissists and men who ...
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21 views

Can you hyphenate paste tense verb for typesetting purposes?

One way to deal with line breaks is to have ragged justification (like in MS Word). Another is to vary interword spacing and use hyphens where necessary. I much prefer the latter. I am not 100% ...
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53 views

Should I use a hyphen with a latin phrase that modifies an adjective that modifies a noun?

I understand that Latin phrases are not normally hyphenated. I also understand that adjective-modifying adverbs normally do receive a hyphen (despite this parenthetically invoked exception). So, which ...
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36 views

Macroregional or Macro-Regional?

I have searched for the correct spelling of "macroregional / macro-regional" on the Internet, but there are used both variants (sometimes even on the same website). Wiktionary spells it as "...
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3answers
166 views

Persistently low lab values vs persistent low lab values?

I cannot seem to find the best way to express this, both in terms of grammar and "correct sounding" feel to English/American readers (which I am not). So, this is the scenario: the serum ...
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1answer
73 views

Hyphenate wrap-around porch? [duplicate]

I do not know if it is correct to use a hyphen between the words wrap, and around, in describing a porch that wraps around a house.
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1answer
47 views

Do the words “en dash” and “em dash” require a hyphen? [duplicate]

I have seen the compound words "en dash" and "em dash" sometimes appear with a hyphen ("en-dash") and sometimes without. Are both the hyphenated and the unhyphenated forms correct?
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Hyphen or no hyphen? [duplicate]

Should I say 'randomly-projected data' or randomly projected data? The randomly refers to the projection itself. The projections are random and the data is projected.
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2answers
74 views

When using title case, how should hyphenated words be capitalized? [closed]

Here's one title that includes a hyphenated words. Also this includes a word that is sometimes capitalized in title case. Aliens are coming in the not-too-distant future! Or an article called: ...
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1answer
41 views

How does one correctly use hyphens in the following contexts?

I read a few articles from APA Style Blog's "Hyphenation Station" series (https://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/hyphenation/), and I'm using these tips to guide my writing. I was wondering if anyone on ...
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70 views

Should the periodic table's groups be hyphenated? [closed]

The elements of the periodic table are arranged in columns or groups. This way, carbon belongs to group IV, whereas nitrogen is in group V. If these group names are used as adjectives, should they be ...
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1answer
55 views

Hyphenation example: sometimes-worried

In writing an essay, I have the phrase: "sometimes worried". Microsoft Word has made the suggestion "sometimes-worried", However, browsing through google and related questions on the site, I m still ...
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3answers
139 views

“Rubber-Safe,” or “Rubber Safe?”

When advertising a product as safe to use on rubber should a hyphen be included between the words "rubber" and "safe?" It seems to me that because it is a compound adjective a hyphen should be used, ...
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51 views

What is the correct use of hyphens and capitals in “Big Brother style pop competition”? [duplicate]

Not sure it technically should have any, but a Big Brother style pop competition feels like quite a mouthful as it is so I’m wondering whether hyphens might help. Also want to check the ...
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53 views

punctuation: the 20 to 30 year old age group

I'd like to know how "the 20 to 30 year old age group" is punctuated in standard English. "30-year-old" should be hyphenated. What about "20 to 30"? Any principles at work? I'd appreciate your help.
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Using hyphenation to avoid ambiguity

When I write a research paper, I often use hyphenation in order to avoid ambiguity. For example, consider the phrase fractionally Pareto optimal allocation A person who does not know these terms ...
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1answer
54 views

How do you hyphenate a phrase with a suffix modifier?

Consider a type of software that is specific to an industry. We might say it's... industry-specific If software is specific to a particular use case ("use case" is a software term) would we say it'...
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24 views

Is this hyphenation use considered correct?

I made a ham-and-Swiss sandwich. I'm wondering if this sentence might be misunderstood as referring to two sandwiches if written without the hyphens. Which form is considered correct? Thanks for ...
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4answers
124 views

How you you spell non self destructive?

Non self-destructive Non-self destructive Non-self-destructive ????? It has to be these
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25 views

Space-and time-efficient [duplicate]

This question has always haunted me, so I decided to settle it for good. Suppose I am saying "We provide space-and time-efficient algorithm for approximating [the number of cats in apartment building]"...
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1answer
42 views

Hyphen rules: should it be “tracking number” or “tracking-number”? [closed]

In the following sentence: Once you have a tracking number for the shipment. Should it be tracking number or tracking-number? I read through the Wikipedia article, but it didn't give a ...
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27 views

Compound adjective hyphenation

In the following sentence: Directly substituting all continuous-time components of X by their previously described discrete-time counterparts results in Y because/as [...] I'm unsure if "...
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1answer
69 views

Can 'smart home' and similar phrases be adjectives if followed by a noun, or do they become complements? [closed]

I'm having some confusion here as I've been tasked with checking that some texts fit a style guide for work, and it requires that two adjectives directly preceding a noun be hyphenated, e.g. 'well-...
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2answers
172 views

How do you divide the syllables of plurals whose singular ends in “-e”?

How do you divide the syllables of plurals whose singular ends in "-e"? For example, is "fences" "fen-ces" or "fenc-es"? Is "appliances" "ap-pli-an-ces" or "ap-pli-anc-es"? The context is not ...
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3answers
369 views

Use hyphen in capitalized title

Do I hyphenate between Moose and Viewing in Moose Viewing Capital of Colorado?
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1answer
89 views

Alcohol free or Alcohol-free

What would the rule be on using a hyphen in "alcohol free?" We are describing a product that is free of alcohol. We use it in different sentence instances such as the following: "The product is the ...
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146 views

Is there a grammatically need to hyphenate the compound words “dumb f*ck” within a novel?

Would I leave the space, hyphenate it, or combine the two works like its similar, less aggressive counterpart: "dumbass" The quote from my novel is from dialogue "It's been six years, you dumb ...
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2answers
63 views

What is the correct punctuation for a repeated word?

I'm creating a presentation for school and I want to title my presentation "The not so secret secret to weight loss" My meaning is that people act as if it is a secret when in fact it is very common ...
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1answer
56 views

Hyphenating measurements in case of a fraction

I am now quite comfortable with the rules of hyphenating measurements (For example, 5-foot-long rod, 7-inch-long handle, etc.) However, what is the rule for hyphenation if the number is a fraction. ...

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