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Questions tagged [hyperbole]

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3
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What is the literary device for giving a human un-human attributes? [duplicate]

What is the literary device for giving a human un-human attributes? For example, a picture of a woman driving a car really quickly saying "She's flying down that road!". What is that literary device? ...
0
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1answer
160 views

What's a word for exaggerations of “worst, best, least, most, etc.”? [duplicate]

I'm trying to recall a word used to describe cases of hyperbole where a speaker refers to a given subject as the ultimate example of something. For example, President Trump stated, "I am the least ...
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1answer
1k views

Can one correctly hyperbolize the “take with a grain of salt” idiom?

There is a common (IMOE) English idiom, "take with a grain (or pinch) of salt", meaning one should be skeptical about the information it accompanies. Many times in the last year I've heard others try ...
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2answers
2k views

The opposite of hyperbole [closed]

Is there a word that reflects the opposite of hyperbole (since "hypobole" is sadly not a real word)?
0
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1answer
453 views

What word is used to describe always using words that mean the extreme?

I'm trying to think of the word that is used to describe someone who always uses words that mean the most or least of a trait (like best, worst, fastest, slowest, brightest, smartest, etc. etc.). I ...
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3answers
1k views

Extremely silent

Is there a word which describes the unnecessary use of adverbs in front of adjectives, usually added to provide emphasis, if the adjective is binary? For example, take the sentence "He was extremely ...
0
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1answer
139 views

Merriam-Webster redefinining “literally”

I think Webster's decision to redefine the word "literally" is wrong. The use of 'literally', where 'figuratively' is appropriate, has two potential causes. Either the speaker doesn't know the ...
1
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1answer
348 views

Is it common for “unmitigated” to be used hyperbolically?

In Thousands of radioactive boars are overrunning farmland in Fukushima, the word "unmitigated" is used, even though it isn't an unqualified disaster, as noted in the next sentence. Nuclear ...
0
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1answer
342 views

Are the following classed as “hyperbole”?

When used in a non-literal, colloquial context, would the phrase "is criminal" be considered hyperbole? For example, used in the following sentence by someone unhappy with how the board are running a ...
1
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1answer
176 views

Which historical figure did the first “further to the right than X” hyperbole figure?

Was the phrase originally "Further to the right than Genghis Khan", "Further to the right than Attila the Hun", or someone else? NGrams for "to the right than Genghis" didn't get any matches, nor did ...
6
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13answers
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Is there a common expression for “origin of everything”? What could it be?

In some languages there is a common pathetic hyperbole that goes like "the origin of origins" or "beginning of beginnings". Is there anything similar in English [or Latin]? Context: consider a ...
5
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5answers
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“Not as heavy as an elephant.” Which literary device is this?

I was having a conversation with a friend today. He jokingly asked me to help him pick up a desktop printer later (he's obviously strong enough to carry one on his own - a typical desktop printer is ...
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1answer
513 views

Why We Need To Know About Hyperboles [closed]

So I realize that hyperboles exist, but in school we're taught about them as if they are truly important to what we are going to be doing in life. I realize their usefulness, but why do we need to ...
0
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1answer
239 views

Are these hyperboles? [closed]

I have to write a diary entry in the perspective of Romeo about Juliet. We just finished act 1. so are any of these hyperboles ? When she walks outside, nature stops for a second to admire her beauty....
5
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0answers
5k views

How should one use “awesome” today? [closed]

Lately I have been hearing the word awesome used in many places. I'm trying to figure out how it is used. It has already been discussed on this site a bit. See "When I'm sad, I stop being ...
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4answers
5k views

Can you say “hyperbolizing”?

When you are expressing something in an exaggerated and ironic way, often to prove a point, can you say that you are hyperbolizing? Could it be used in a way where you could end the statement with it? ...
2
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2answers
17k views

Usage and correctness of the term “Better than Best”

I have heard the term "Better than Best" used at few places. How is it different than saying just "best"? For example : a) He is better than the best. b) He is the best. 1) How are (a) and (b) ...
5
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1answer
2k views

What are representative examples of exaggerated simile like “I never in a million years thought I’d see this.”?

I found the expression, “I never in a million years thought I’d see this,” in the New York Times’ article (November 9) commenting on pedophiliac harassment scandals of Penn State under the headline, “...
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10answers
6k views

What word means “taking something to unrealistic extremes”?

This has been bugging me for a while, does anyone know what this word is? Maybe I imagined it. I thought it might have been "superfluous", but I don't think that is it, then I thought it might have ...
19
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4answers
10k views

Origin of “he's 6 feet tall if he's an inch”

I have heard this pattern used before in American English: She's 6 feet tall if she's an inch. It was a gallon of blood if it was a drop. The baby was 10 pounds if it was an ounce. I ...