Questions tagged [homophones]

Homophones are words that are pronounced the same but have different meanings. They aren't necessarily spelled the same.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Are “one” and “won” homophones in Australian English?

My friend and I are both native speakers of Australian English. He thinks "one" and "won" sound different and feels "a one-liner" sounds wrong and should be "an one-liner". He does think the two ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

“Sic on” or “Sick on”? [closed]

What is the actual spelling of "sic"/"sick" in a phrase like "I will sic my dog on you"? This is a tricky one to look up in an online dictionary, every match seems to be referring to an editor's mark ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Are the words 'lawyerly' and 'loyally' homophones in BrE?

In American English there is a clear difference, but do the words 'lawyerly' and 'loyally' actually sound the same in British English?
2
votes
2answers
200 views

Are the words “Aural” and “Oral” homophones?

Are the words "Aural" and "Oral" usually pronounced the same? Does it vary by dialect? Are there strategies that people use to differentiate them when listening to spoken English?
1
vote
0answers
80 views

Tear (eye water) vs Tear (rip and rend)

I'm working on a fiction story titled "The War of Tears". Now most people would read the last word, Tears, as the water that comes from ones eyes when emotional. However, I want it to be Tears, as in ...
1
vote
0answers
130 views

Specific type of abbreviation in textese

I would like to know if there is preexisting metalanguage or a term to describe the following types of abbreviations often present in textese or SMS language: see → c, you → u, are → r, your → ur, ...
2
votes
1answer
370 views

Polish and polish sort of words [duplicate]

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word but differs in meaning. Is there a name for two words with the same spelling but with different meanings? For example: Polish (someone ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Are “wuzzy” and “was he” homophones?

Can you have multiple-word homophones? If not, what would such pairs of same-sounding multiple words be called? There is the funny/children's rhyming poem Fuzzy Wuzzy: Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear. ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Explaining the “e” in “bye”? [duplicate]

Was the ‑e at the end of bye deliberately added in order to distinguish it from the word by? Did they do that so that that way, even though the two words sound the same, they look different when ...
3
votes
1answer
349 views

Should I pronounce the singular “Irishman” and the plural “Irishmen” identically?

Can someone tell me how to pronounce the following: Irishman/Irishmen I have read carefully, according to the online Oxford Living Dictionaries, the pronunciation of words like Irishman/Irishmen: ...
-2
votes
2answers
388 views

Two distinct given names that have the same pronunciation? [closed]

Are there any two distinct given names that have the same pronunciation? There are many such among, for example, Japanese-language and Chinese-language given names. I wonder if there are any in ...
2
votes
1answer
252 views

Verbally differentiating between “sign” and “sine”

I'm teaching math to undergrads. The classes are taught in English, which is a second language for me. In the middle of one class I've stumbled upon an unexpected problem: the inability to ...
0
votes
1answer
166 views

an unheared missing word [closed]

Somewhere, I have heard a sentence similar to: The main problem is the plagiarism exosinated by the Internet. Instead of the meaningless bold word, what English similar word will make sense?
1
vote
0answers
414 views

Hyphenated and non-hyphenated words that are homophones?

We know of many cases where hyphens are necessary to distinguish a compound word (man-eating) from a pair of separate words (man and eating). But are there any cases where a hyphenated word has a ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Trying To Determine If There Is A Definition For This Type Of Spell/Word Play

Apologies for the extremely vague title but considering I don't even know how to properly phrase what I'm trying to ask, I had no idea how else to describe it. Basically I am familiar with homographs ...
0
votes
1answer
138 views

(translated) homophone request - luck & chicken

Homophone request. The Year of The Rooster is upon us. The Chinese love their homophones. We have “鸡” (toneless pinyin: ji) chicken and “吉” (toneless pinyin: ji) lucky. I'm trying to see if there ...
1
vote
0answers
171 views

Bear and Bare - Do you hear the difference? Perhaps those in NJ or NY? [closed]

So, for instance, Carrey and Berry have a difference with the vowels. Does anyone hear the difference in the two examples I gave? I am looking for the truest definition of "Homophone."
0
votes
1answer
416 views

Is there implicit racism in the word guerrilla?

The pronunciation of the word "guerrilla" is a close homophone to the word "gorilla". Is there any implicit racism in the origin or later usage of the word "guerrilla", based perhaps on the inferior ...
204
votes
5answers
25k views

Are “whores” and “horse” homophones?

I’m Spanish but sometimes see TV shows in English. My question is whether the words horse and whores sound exactly the same, because in many English language TV shows it seems like they are, which ...
1
vote
2answers
205 views

How to stop using homophones in written English

I am not natively an English speaker, though it is a taught language from childhood and I have been using the language long enough. I have a problem though with using homophones instead of the actual ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Are “dual” and “duel” necessarily homophones?

The pronunuciation of the words dual and duel is generally given in dictionaries as /ˈd(j)uːəl/. Thus the two words are homophones. However, saying these words to myself, I think I detect a slight ...
6
votes
2answers
12k views

“rendered mute” vs “rendered moot”

I have seen both, and now I am unsure when to use which. To the best of my knowledge "rendered mute" is roughly equivalent to "rendered speechless" and "rendered moot" to "rendered irrelevant". But I ...
3
votes
1answer
111 views

What kind of spelling error is using “are” in the place of “our”?

It's using the homophone but is there a name for that kind of spelling error in Child Writing Acquisition? The whole phrase is: After that we Played with are inten do will". Of course there ...
6
votes
2answers
6k views

Meaning of phrase “Early/late in the piece”

I've heard people say "this early in the piece" or "this late in the piece". It seems to be spoken as a kind of idiomatic expression, but I'm not sure what it really means. What is the meaning of the ...
-2
votes
2answers
20k views

Why is “genius” often misspelt as “geniOus”? What are its etymons, etymology, homonyms and similar words? [closed]

Why do people confuse between similar or related words: genius, ingenious, genuous and ingenuous? Why has "genious" not been a valid word unlike both genuous and ingenuous, and genuine and ingenuine? ...
14
votes
1answer
11k views

Homogenous versus Homogeneous

I've always used the word (spelling) homogenous to describe things of similar nature. However, when I started university I heard everyone use the word homogeneous (pronounced "homo genius" or "homo ...
-1
votes
1answer
30k views

In the phrase “to see how something fares / fairs”, is it “fare” or “fair” that should be used? [closed]

"To see how something(someone) fares, or fairs". Which is the correct one to use in this expression? And what is the etymology, or history behind the expression?
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Homophones/Homonyms/Homographs

I apologise in advance if this is a duplicate, but I did search this site and did not find exactly what I was after. I've been searching on Google for a while now regarding homophones, homonyms and ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

Are “ball” (formal event) and “ball” (sphere for playing with) etymologically related? [closed]

This is a ball: source But so is this: source Why do we use the same word for a formal social gathering with dancing and a round toy for throwing and catching? Is there some kind of shared ...
-2
votes
2answers
388 views

How do you deal with homonyms in a list?

I was thinking about it, and, is there a proper way to deal with having homonyms in a list? Would you characterize it as one object, for example: I have two notebooks in my bag. Or would you treat ...
3
votes
1answer
292 views

The word “mine”: Anyone else use a velar nasal /maiŋ/ for “belongs to me” meaning, but still /main/ for “explosive”/“coal mine”?

I think I naturally distinguish these words: mine (ie "belongs to me") /maiŋ/ mine (ie "explosive" or "coal mine") /main/ I vaguely remember noticing this years ago, but I was only just reminded of ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Where can I find a dictionary for homonyms? [closed]

I want to know where I can find a dictionary that I can look up homonyms of a word. For instance if I type in alien it will show me the word salient. That dictionary should base on the sound itself, ...
1
vote
1answer
206 views

What is the actual word for Leaving Out an Examination?

I am from Nepal, our primary language is not English, so many times there are confusion on words which sound similar and have similar meanings sometimes. Recently, I got into a situation, where I ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Homonyms/homophones and proper nouns

I introduced my 6-year-old to the concept of "homonyms" (though I've probably got it conflated with homophones or vice-versa). Since then he's been trying to find homonyms. He asked me just now: "Can ...
3
votes
2answers
312 views

Why are *accept* and *except* commonly misspelled as each other? Are they homophones?

Why are accept and except commonly confused for each other when writing? This is unlike most cases, where misspellings come from homophones. In my idiolect at least, accept is /ək.'sɛpt/, and except ...
8
votes
4answers
4k views

Usage of diffuse vs. defuse

I often hear phrases such as "infantry were sent in to diffuse/defuse the situation," and I am never quite sure which people are saying, and which is correct. Both seem to make sense. To me (a ...
13
votes
5answers
8k views

If a word has two different meanings, is it two different words or one word with different meanings?

My brother and sister-in-law are arguing about whether "train" meaning locomotive and "train" meaning teach constitutes one word with two different meanings or if it's two different words. I said ...
-2
votes
1answer
617 views

Can anyone come up with two names whose pronunciations are respectively same as “who” and “how”? [closed]

I would like to find out occidental names whose pronunciation are close to my names in my native language. The first name and second name contain preferably only Latin alphabet. In order to state the ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Which word has the same pronuncation as the word “may”?

What is the homophone of the word may? I can't find one real dictionary of homophones, nor is there an answer through Google.
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Are homonyms considered single words?

There are many homonyms in the English language, words that are spelled the same and pronounced the same but have different meanings. A few examples: A grizzly bear can bear great weight. I stake out ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

Is there a term/word for using an incorrect homophone

What would you call the following: Speak now or forever hold your piece.
0
votes
1answer
30k views

“Nice to talk to” or “Nice to talk too”

One of my friends has corrected someone on their grammar on a social media site. And they think they should say "Nice to talk too". I think it is "Nice to talk to", because "too" is an adverb meaning "...
7
votes
1answer
5k views

Distinguishing /f–t–θ/ in th-fronting and th-stopping dialects

In standard English, the digraph th is a dental fricative [θ, ð]. Several dialects feature th-fronting, where th becomes a labiodental fricative [f, v]; others feature th-stopping, where th becomes a ...
4
votes
1answer
12k views

“dispatch” v “despatch” [closed]

Using it in the example of: Can you log despatch and delivery of documents? Three questions: Is despatch a misspelling of dispatch that made its way into the dictionary? Could I use dispatch ...
1
vote
3answers
18k views

“Night” and “knight” in speech

In English as Germanic language K is ignored at the beginning of word in speech. Night and knight have to be pronounced similar. Then how to differentiate?
-1
votes
2answers
409 views

Has the contraction “you’re” finally been replaced by “your”?

Your is almost universally used these days for you’re (“you are”). Is the misuse of your a result of ignorance, or is the contraction now formally dead?
4
votes
3answers
17k views

Are “flower” and “flour” always homophones?

Flower and flour are said to be homophones. However, considering the number of different pronunciations (/flaʊə/ like BrE sour, /flou(-ə)r/ like AmE sour, /flɑː/ (forvo) like BrE car, etc.) floating ...
2
votes
3answers
653 views

Are “rode” and “rowed” pronounced the same?

Is there an English accent which would distinguish these two sentences? He rode from the bridge to the pier. He rowed from the bridge to the pier.
2
votes
3answers
17k views

Do “here” and “hear” have the same phonetic transcription in the same country?

Is there any accent that makes a distinction when pronuncing “here” and “hear”? From Wiktionary: Here (UK) /hɪə(ɹ)/ (US) /hɪɹ/ Hear (UK) /hɪə(ɹ)/ (US) IPA: /hiːɹ/ So, according to that, US ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Is there a name for words following this pattern?

Word pairs like bizarre and bazaar, although spelled differently sound very similar. It also seems like they are more than just a pair of rhyming words. Is there a classification within rhyming words?...