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Questions tagged [homographs]

Homographs are words that are spelled the same but have different meanings. They aren't necessarily pronounced the same.

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2answers
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Opposing homonyms [duplicate]

I'm aware of precisely one word that is spelled and pronounced the same, yet has a completely opposite meaning depending on its context: sanction. On one hand, it is official permission for something....
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0answers
295 views

Are verbs “to run” as in “to run a business” and “to run” as in “to run a marathon” considered to be homonyms/homographs?

Or is there just a single verb "to run" that has different meanings and therefore it cannot be considered a homonym/homograph to itself?
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1answer
76 views

Trying To Determine If There Is A Definition For This Type Of Spell/Word Play

Apologies for the extremely vague title but considering I don't even know how to properly phrase what I'm trying to ask, I had no idea how else to describe it. Basically I am familiar with homographs ...
2
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1answer
143 views

“Conflict” Resolution: How to decide if two words are generally “unmistakable”?

Conflict Resolution in Stenographic Transcription The purpose of this question is for stenography. Stenographers often have “conflicts” in their writing, or in their typing using machine shorthand. ...
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4answers
772 views

Origin of the “breach” sense of “compromise”

Both wiktionary and etymonline give the origin of compromise as Latin com (together) + promittere (promise). This is the most common use of this word: to mutually promise to [abide by an arbitrated ...
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2answers
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Why is “genius” often misspelt as “geniOus”? What are its etymons, etymology, homonyms and similar words? [closed]

Why do people confuse between similar or related words: genius, ingenious, genuous and ingenuous? Why has "genious" not been a valid word unlike both genuous and ingenuous, and genuine and ingenuine? ...
5
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2answers
3k views

Homophones/Homonyms/Homographs

I apologise in advance if this is a duplicate, but I did search this site and did not find exactly what I was after. I've been searching on Google for a while now regarding homophones, homonyms and ...
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1answer
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Are “ball” (formal event) and “ball” (sphere for playing with) etymologically related? [closed]

This is a ball: source But so is this: source Why do we use the same word for a formal social gathering with dancing and a round toy for throwing and catching? Is there some kind of shared ...
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4answers
2k views

Word meaning “to sort again”

When you perform an action again, you can usually just put "re" in front of the existing verb - e.g. "shuffle" becomes "reshuffle". However, "resort" is its own word that doesn't mean "to sort again" ...
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1answer
1k views

Two quite different meanings of “bear”

As a noun, a bear is a type of carnivore. As a verb, to bear means to support or produce. I wonder how the two meanings finally ended up in one single word. Is there any connection between the two ...
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2answers
395 views

Differentiating homographs [closed]

A homograph (from the Greek: ὁμός, homós, "same" and γράφω, gráphō, "write") is a word that shares the same written form as another word but has a different meaning. When spoken, the meanings may be ...
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8answers
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Homograph challenge [closed]

My friend said the other day, "I hate when a sentence starts with the word polish, because you don't know whether they mean polish or Polish." polish (v) - to make smooth and glossy Polish (a) - ...
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2answers
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If you send an email that you already sent, can you say you “resent” it? Same as “resenting” someone?

I resent my email. I resent my mother. I resent my email to my mother. Odd, isn't it?
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1answer
1k views

What is a term for words that are both homophones and homographs?

While there are homophones like bear and bare, and homographs like sow, the pig, and to sow a seed, is there a term for words that cover both categories? The example that comes to mind for me is to ...
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4answers
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Present, present, and present?

Please present your next idea. Did you buy her a present? No vacancies at present. Do all the bold words have the same spelling, yet all of them have different meanings based on the context?...