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Questions tagged [headline-english]

Questions about the compressed style of English commonly employed in newspaper headlines.

30
votes
4answers
9k views

Why do newspaper headlines use strange syntax rules?

Newspaper/news article headlines usually have different syntax rules, for example No copula. North Korea trip 'successful' Past events written in present. Qantas cancels flight out of frozen Heathrow ...
1
vote
1answer
503 views

Why did The New York Times use the present simple to describe a past event? [duplicate]

Statement is as follows: Obama makes a surprise visit to Afghanistan. Is this a simple present tense? If yes then please explain As per the definition of simple present tense, this statement ...
7
votes
1answer
832 views

What does “To” mean in a newspaper headline?

What does to mean in a newspaper headline, for example: Airline XY to cut cost of pilots' wages Is it a shorter form of "Is going to" or "Is planning to"?
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Is it ok to omit a possessive apostrophe before a capitalized appellation (President, country name, VP, PM)?

In a recent Financial Times article (Yemen PM Escapes Assissnation), the apostrophe necessary to show possession was left out. I've seen colleagues do it as well. Isn't it supposed to be "Yemen's PM ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Infinitive in news headlines

I'm a little bit confused with understanding news titles. I recently started to read news in English willing to improve my language skills, but there is one thing that I totally can't understand (and ...
7
votes
5answers
440 views

“Gadhafi forces retreat” - how do you understand that?

Our local newspaper had the headline today "Gadhafi forces retreat" and I read it with "retreat" as the verb instead of "forces" as the verb. I know it is a poorly written headline, but which way is ...
3
votes
5answers
2k views

Struggling to understand headlines that use ellipsis

I have trouble understanding headlines because they abuse ellipsis. Two examples: "Mitt Romney, Paul Ryan To Awkwardly Hug, High Five For Next Three Months" "Scores Dead as Fire Sweeps Through ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

Capital letters in headlines [closed]

I’m not a native English speaker. I’ve noticed that in titles or headlines, many words often start with a capital letter while others are still lowercase. As an example, the title of my question ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

Why in error messages verb 'be' is not used? [duplicate]

In the computer world error messages are written without verb 'be'. For example, file not found, file not exist, command not found, no such file or directory and so on. So why verb 'be'...
0
votes
2answers
98 views

Question about headline “Inmate Dies Anyway”

I came across this headline: "Oklahoma Stops Botched Execution. Inmate Dies Anyway." (link) I was truly disturbed by the use of "anyway". To me, it implies a nonchalant attitude about something that ...
-2
votes
1answer
76 views

“Fidel Castro Dead” - Is this Slang or common English Usage? [closed]

English is not my mother tongue, so I'm not sure if the title of an article I've read is legit: "Fidel Castro Dead". Shouldn't it be "Fidel Castro is dead"?