Questions tagged [grammaticality]

This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

"Too great of a [risk]" OR "Too great a [risk]"? [duplicate]

First, I want to emphasize that my question is general. I want your answer regarding all of the cases in the following sentence stractures: [Adjective] + of + [Noun] (For example: It is too great of ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
54 views

Using "who" and "whom" in the same sentence

This one is confusing me. I've tried replacing with "they / them" but I just can't seem to work out which choice is correct. Here is the offending sentence: "There are those who(m) ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

Singular possessive to stand for a finite collective of individuals?

For context, this is taken from an academic study analysing qualitative data from a finite number of interviewees. In the conclusion, the writer asserts the following: Collectively, the interviewee's ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
23 views

I need to know whether my sentence tone is correct for a Software Product [closed]

You recently made an offline purchase, and the payment methods associated with that subscription have been dissociated. So update your payment method in our Payment portal. This is the statement I am ...
user avatar
  • 3
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

suggests or suggested? [closed]

I'd like to know the difference in these two sentences: He said the cause is not known, but evidence at the scene suggested foul play. He said the cause is not known, but evidence at the scene ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Can the past tense be used as an adjective such as in 'plastic bottled drinks' or 'glass bottomed boat'? [duplicate]

I'm wondering about the use of the past tense as an adjective and whether it is possible to use it in noun phrases such as 'glass bottom boat' and 'plastic bottle drinks.' Are 'glass bottomed boat' ...
user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
52 views

Could " we'd better .." be replaced with " we will .." in the sentence below?

" I reckon we'd better hit some water tomorrow" Or " I reckon we will hit some water tomorrow" I have two more questions . Is the word " better " adverb here and if the ...
user avatar
  • 57
9 votes
2 answers
163 views

How to analyze the trope "because NOUN" grammatically

In recent years it has become something of a trope to respond to a question with the stark reply "because noun". For example, Q. Why can't we burn fossil fuels indefinitely? A. Because ...
user avatar
  • 146k
0 votes
1 answer
103 views

Can "neither" be a conjunction by itself?

On LDOCE, at the definition page of "neither", there is one definition that describes the word as a conjunction, with the sentence: The authorities were not sympathetic to the students’ ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
84 views

Is this a case of free indirect speech?

I would like to know if Rowling uses the technique of free indirect speech in this piece of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, particularly in the italicized part. Harry was silent. Judging by ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
194 views

is “you who want” grammatically correct if the you pronoun is plural?

I was reading a poem in which one of the lines was: “that you are, you who want to grasp the heart of things.” When I read it I thought it was a typo. Can the pronoun “you” be plural here? And if so ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

Reduced relative clause with adverbial clause/phrase [duplicate]

People who, before their friends arrive, like spending time on the phone are normal these days. (relative clause with adverbial clause) Students who, after completing their lessons, go playing ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
64 views

Why are countable nouns sometimes used as uncountable nouns? [duplicate]

For example, I've often heard the phrase, "how much house can one buy?" There are some other examples as well I've seen where a countable noun is used as a quantity rather than a discrete ...
user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
92 views

What does the preposition "to" mean in these sentences?

The tissue sample is cut with scissors just distal to the ligature. The tissue distal to the suture is cut with a scalpel blade. There's an adorable waitress at the coffee shop next to my house. The ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

To be + gerund with agent as subject complement

My friend asks: Why didn't you come to the party last night? I say: The reason was my roommate feeling sick, so I had to stay home and take care of him. I wonder, is it correct to use: subject + to ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
58 views

Should you capitalize titles that are questions?

In my job, we often have to make technical tutorials either as presentations or videos. Some presentations contain slides where a question is a title or the introductory title. For example: #27 In a ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
65 views

To be +gerund with agent

Is it correct to say? It was me working on my car that was causing annoying sounds. Me working on my car – gerund (with agent) as subject complement. That was causing annoying sounds – relative ...
user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
136 views

"Given a man walking a dog and a cat,..." [duplicate]

I want to write a sentence that starts similar to Given a man walking a dog and a cat, ... This could be interpreted as "given a man that is walking both a dog and a cat". "given (a ...
user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
77 views

Which (if any) is the grammatically correct form of this sentence? [closed]

The sentence is intended to convey that it is easy to fall into a pattern, and the pattern might be one of two types: consecutive sentences or repeatedly introducing paragraphs in the same way. It’s ...
user avatar
  • 123
-1 votes
1 answer
47 views

What's wrong with "There is nobody John works with who doesn’t love him"? [closed]

There is nobody John works with who doesn’t love him. (The sentence means to say that everyone with whom John works loves him.) What is the core problem in this sentence? The obvious problems that I'...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
59 views

"there were expected" vs "there were expected to be"

There aren't half as many guests as there were expected. There aren't half as many guests as there were expected to be. What's the difference if I add in the end of that sentence "to be"? ...
user avatar
  • 135
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Using "later" as a connector in formulas like "to, later, make a new proposal"

I was wondering if it would be correct to use later in a construction like this: "We will study the domain of interest to, later, propose several improvements" The idea is to write a ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

Advice on correct structure for using complete sentences in parenthesis

I am trying to include a person's thoughts inside parenthesis. This involves breaking a sentence with other sentences within brackets. Is the following correct structure and grammar or is there a ...
user avatar
  • 111
-2 votes
2 answers
156 views

How to say "I would like you to know..." but begin with "You, who I would like ..."? [closed]

I would like to say something like "You, who I would like you to know about this". But the second "you" seems wrong. What is the correct way to write this sentence?
user avatar
  • 99
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Correct logical comparison: "Less fortunate than I am" or "less fortunate than myself"? [duplicate]

I am trying to write a sentence like this: "I want to help those who are less fortunate than I am." I am not sure about the last part and whether I am comparing the right things: There's ...
user avatar
  • 3
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

...we are brought to this point

I cannot say what role the New York Times v. Sullivan decision has played in bringing us to this point, if it has played any role at all, but I can say that it is a very big deal that we are brought ...
user avatar
  • 1,246
0 votes
3 answers
86 views

Is it right to say “Ever have I done…? [closed]

Is it right to say “Ever have I done something wrong in my life“ &“Ever have I been to that basketball academy“. So , these are two different examples I have chosen for sentence Ever have I. ...
user avatar
  • 117
1 vote
0 answers
81 views

Can the use of singular 'they' for a dog that was just called 'she' be considered correct in English?

There's a video on the internet of a dog under the covers and the owner lifts the covers as the large dog spills out and onto the floor like water. The person refers to the dog as "she". In ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
128 views

Only this way (we can)/(can we)? (Or why is negative inversion necessary?) [duplicate]

In general, we would say "Only this way can we", but I also came across many sentences in the internet which use “Only this way we can”. Is the expression "Only this way we can" ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
93 views

What kind of past habit fits this text? "were always doing" or "used to do" [closed]

As I understand it, there are three ways to explain past habits: Would Past continuous Used to According to that, what is the best form of past habits for the following text? My sister and I had a ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

My question is about clauses placement in past tense

In simple past, we tell the chronological order of events in which they have occured in clauses and in past perfect we tell which event or action has happened before in those two actions. So,I have 2 ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
43 views

'greater that' instead of 'greater than' - typo, autocorrect or new usage? [closed]

I regularly see people on the web type things like 'The health benefits of cycling are greater that the risks of being sedentary', where to me that should be 'greater than'. It seems like an odd typo ...
user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Is it correct to say "he is realized" to show a gain of awareness?

The following is the sentence I am writing: "Perhaps, he trembles at the sight of this act not solely for the fear of exposure but because he is realized of the horridness of his actions." ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
86 views

'focus fully on' or 'fully focus on' [closed]

A student wrote '(I) focused fully on cycling'. I am quite certain about 'I fully focused on' but I think his phrasing was grammatically correct too.
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
66 views

Predicate genitive [closed]

Can anyone give me a syntactical description for this of-construction, does it imply possessiveness or the characteristic of something? The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, are of imagination all ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

"And" or "or" omitted in this sentence? [duplicate]

In the following sentence, is it correct to assume that “and” or “or” is omitted before “through our online services”? If so, is such an omission grammatically acceptable, or is it just an error by ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

How to use has or have when referring to "These groups"

Must I use "has order 44215589120 with index 1120" or "have orders 44215589120 with indices 1120" when referring to "These groups" in the sentence "These groups are ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
88 views

Scottish use of "and them" as a subject

Living in Scotland, I am accustomed to hearing "and them" used in non-controversial constructions such as "We are going to see Fiona and them for Christmas", where "them" ...
user avatar
  • 22.2k
0 votes
2 answers
37 views

What does "how toward..." and "late addition" mean in this sentence?

"Around the time they first met, Daniel had told Mary Jane how toward the end of his parents’ lives—Daniel a late addition—his mother and father spoke only through the dog.> " What does ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

Why do we say "It's me (or our name)" when we answer the phone? Why do we use "it" to answer the phone? [duplicate]

I kind of understand why we say "This is ..." when answering the phone; I'm guessing that "this" refers to the person who answers the phone. However, I can't understand and find ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
88 views

Is "make the largest possible X but not too large" grammatical? [closed]

Someone claimed this sentence is using incorrect grammar: Make the largest possible X but not too large. Context: imagine you have an API that tells you the largest supported size. You want to test ...
user avatar
  • 203
-1 votes
1 answer
39 views

How to use is and are in a sentence [closed]

Which of the following is correct: The price to pay for these favors is souls The price to pay for these favors are souls
user avatar
  • 3
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

"In this regard" vs "in regards to this"

I am not a native English speaker but have had English as the medium of instruction throughout my education. While writing an email application, I wrote this line as a concluding statement. "Let ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
119 views

Subjunctive "be" inversion [closed]

Can i invert the protasis bellow : If you not be, ... Into : Be you not, ... Will it not —in an archaic sense— be mistaken for imperative and will it convey the same conditional notion?
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
78 views

Capitalisation for emphasis?

Let's say we have a time card software system. In the help FAQ, is the second version grammatically correct, or preferable? How can we locate time cards that had errors? How can we locate Time Cards ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
65 views

Improving readability and comprehensibility of sentences in which a relative clause separates the subject and predicate

I want to bring more readability and structure in my sentences. I often write sentences in the following format / structure: To incorporate A which can be seen as B with something of C (c.f. Sect. X) ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Could you please help and explain to me how to correct the seemingly incorrect passive voice sentence pattern?

Could you please help and explain to me how to correct the seemingly incorrect passive voice sentence pattern? I would prefer it if we could be sat next to a window.
user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Is "99.9% of the X community is degenerate" grammatical? [duplicate]

In all honesty, this is a bit of a dumb question. So I recently had a conversation about a video game and my friend said "99.9% of the League community is degenerate." I told him that it's ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
49 views

how to use "that" properly

We look forward to a revised proposal that the installation of lift will not lead to any loss of the school premises nor worsen the existing school environment. Is proposal that alright? Or is ...
user avatar
  • 687
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

“…that the privations on the soul grow ever more stark and ruinous by the day.” - Can the word “privations” be used in this format?

Is it admissible to use to the phrase “privations on the soul” to describe the state in which the needs of the soul are not met and thus starved?
user avatar
  • 1