Questions tagged [grammaticality]

This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

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1answer
893 views

''Should you have decided'' Inversion

In an email I received from my university, the following is stated: Should you have decided to do the assignment, please send us an email. My question is whether the inversion and usage of should ...
3
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1answer
644 views

A plural noun is used with a singular verb in a proper English speech—why?

From the film script of Gladiator (2000): Your faults as a son, is my failure as a father My question is: how come?! If anyone (unless you're one those very good few who get to define what the ...
3
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1answer
192 views

Seem small clause

It is said that the omission of "to be" is allowed only when the adjective (phrases), noun (phrases), or prepositional phrase comes after the to be like this: a He seemed (to be) angry about the ...
3
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1answer
416 views

Can you say "rancoring"?

I know it's an adjective, but I googled it, and found it in an article about John McEnroe, specifically, "a rancoring go-to-hell beast". I was wondering if it is okay to use the word as if it were a ...
3
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2answers
42 views

Placement of “anymore” with respect to other complements, as in "not possible anymore to …"

I often see sentences like this from non-native speakers: ?It is not possible anymore to cross the border without a passport. To me, this sounds wrong, and I would write this instead: It is no ...
3
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1answer
88 views

How do I make this sentence grammatically correct?

As this week’s lesson comes to an end, we have now completed both Unit One and Two, a perfect time to reflect on what we have learned. I think there is something wrong with the tense here, but I'm ...
3
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1answer
395 views

Subordinating conjunctions "who" & "when" as subject clause?

I understand who and when can be used to introduce adjective clause for sure like the following sentences. The time when it is good for us to meet has not been decided. The person who is qualified ...
3
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3answers
304 views

Trying to determine if a specific clause/phrase is essential or non-essential

I am a volunteer English tutor. My advanced ESL student wrote the following sentence after reading an article: However, recent studies, in Sweden and in Finland, have found out that different ...
2
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0answers
31 views

Omitting the verb but changing the subject in enumeration

If I say: Alpha denotes the car's speed and Beta [denotes] the acceleration. Can I omit the second "denotes"? Is there any rule that justifies this? The omission sounds good to me in the ...
2
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2answers
100 views

Why do we use past perfect instead of past tense here?

"We couldn't put down the floor until the plumber HAD finished." When 'finished' would do the same job much more perfectly instead of confusing.
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0answers
152 views

Have got + adjective (Present Perfect)

this is a question most suited to British speakers! I am aware of the difference between the British and the American "get" conjugation (got-gotten). Now, I have come across the sentence "My cough has ...
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0answers
127 views

syntactic function of word "if"

What syntactic function does the word "if" serves in this sentence. Certain pesticides can become ineffective if used repeatedly in the same place. This sentence is taken from GMAC prep material ...
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0answers
67 views

"Named" as a past participle adjective or relative clause

'I passed the exam.' The exam = 'The passed exam.' 'I named the boy.' The boy = 'The named boy.' 'I called the girl.' The girl = 'The called girl.' What = 'The boy named John.'? What = 'The girl ...
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0answers
119 views

"Try one's hand at something" -- why is it not hands?

I came across this phrase today Try one's hand at something Why is it not hands since we have a pair of hands? In addition to that, I have also noticed both pleasing to the ear pleasing ...
2
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1answer
417 views

Can present perfect tense be used with the adverb "earlier"?

I would like to know if the present perfect construction can be used in the two following sentences that employ the adverb earlier: As I have said earlier, I don't like her at all. I have been to ...
2
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0answers
98 views

Usage of “so” in “So do I”

What are the grammatical rules behind the construction using “so” in the following examples? A: “I like chocolate.” B: “So do I.” Alice likes chocolate. So does Bob. Both examples seem to be correct....
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0answers
30k views

at our side / on our side / from our side

I'm developing a web form wich communicates with an external service and they are validating the data that I send to them from the web form. But, I would like to manage the validation by my self. I'm ...
2
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0answers
87 views

Semantic implications of "The President and we are disbanding the Forum"

In a widely publicized statement, a group of CEO's on President Trump's "Strategic and Policy Forum" wrote that because of contention surrounding recent statements by the president: As such, the ...
2
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0answers
304 views

Is the placement of the participial phrase correct here?

I am using a participial phrase to modify the noun. But instead of the more common way of starting the sentence with the participial phrase, I want to use a medial parenthesis: So instead of this ...
2
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0answers
846 views

How to drop a pronoun? (pronoun-dropping/removing 'I'/omitting the subject)

I wrote resume and got stuck in this place. There are recommendations to write your achievements in the short form (without "I"): "Worked with ... " "Created something ... " "Collaborated with ... "...
2
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1answer
278 views

Small clauses (or verbless clauses)

Small clauses are clauses with "to be" deleted. I found him (to be) difficult. And as we all know, an adjective complement can be added afterward. I found him (to be) difficult to work with. ...
2
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1answer
2k views

"Twice (adj.)-er" vs. "two times (adj.)-er" vs. "twice/two times as (adj.) as"

Suppose we are comparing a particular characteristic (that takes comparative -er) of two items, A and B. Compared to B, A displays double that characteristic. There are multiple ways we can express ...
2
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1answer
14k views

What's the correct phrase to use? In our app or on our app

This new service will be available in our app. This new service will be available on our app. What's correct? Second one feels wrong but interested to know what's right here.
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1answer
92 views

I am confused with usage about 'the' and object complement

Is the sentence as below correct in grammar? And is it clear enough? Please copy & paste keyword, mykeyword, into the search box of Google Play Store app or website to locate this pure app ...
2
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1answer
17k views

Which one is grammatically correct: "wood door" or "wooden door"

I have a grammar which says that: "The 'noun+noun' structure is normally used to say what things are made of." "A few pairs of nouns and adjectives are used as modifiers with different meanings. ...
2
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1answer
170 views

"The soil is too arid to plant seeds." Is "to plant seeds" correct here?

I feel something's wrong with the part "to plant seeds", whose logical subject should be a person. I wonder if the sentence is right or how to correct it the other way around.
2
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1answer
70 views

Posessive pronouns after a noun?

I seem to recall reading something like "anguish thine is but a dream". The posessive pronoun thine is after a noun anguish it relates to. Probably, it is from some verse. I don't encounter such ...
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0answers
24 views

Why do we sometimes omit and sometimes retain the conjunctions "because/while/when etc" when reducing adverb clauses?

We can reduce this sentence "Because she has a test next week, she is studying very hard." (1-1) -> "Having a test next week, she is studying very hard." (1-2) "Before he ...
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27 views

Perfect infinitive- Expressing future

The perfect infinitive can refer to something that will be completed at a point in the future. Example: We hope to have finished the building works by the end of March. Can I replace the verb "...
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0answers
65 views

Why do Christians in American deep south say "whenever" when they mean "when"?

As a midwestern American (Iowa), I want to understand the history, reason, and mechanics of why southern Americans say "whenever" when the word "when" would suffice. For instance: ...
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1answer
52 views

What is “what” in “what has been called“?

Climate change is thus a prime example of what people have called a "social ecological system" with factors from different domains interacting on different spatial and temporal scales. The ...
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0answers
49 views

Can we neglect subject in passive voice?

Hello I want to know that whether the following statement grammatically and semantically correct or not ceremony has been decided to be held tomorrow here it is in passive voice and we are not ...
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0answers
20 views

Dialogue usage uncertainty

Sorry for the vague title! I'm writing a short story and I'm wondering if the below sentence is correct. Should a new paragraph be started when she hears the shout, since it's technically dialogue? Or ...
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0answers
50 views

Is this the correct usage of commas in Alice in Wonderland?

Reading Alice in Wonderland, I noticed a strange use of commas: The only things in the kitchen that did not sneeze, were the cook, and a large cat which was sitting on the hearth and grinning from ...
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0answers
69 views

What does this "neither....nor" sentence really mean?

"There are neither serious doubts about Facebook’s dominant position on the German social network market nor the fact that Facebook is abusing this dominant position,” the court said. What does ...
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0answers
36 views

I would enjoy it, but I've already seen it

CONTEXT: John has asked Samantha out, and they are going to the movies. John tells Samantha the name of the movie they are about to watch. Samantha has already seen that movie, and she doesn't want to ...
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0answers
38 views

Training of vs Training for

training for all users across.. training of all users across.. Are these interchangeable and grammatically correct?
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0answers
110 views

Help me understand the structure of this sentence from Virginia Woolf To the Lighthouse

I have some knowledge of English syntax with tree diagrams. Now, I'm learning traditional sentence diagramming. Of course, I want to challenge myself, and I chose to understand a sentence from ...
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0answers
15 views

Singular vs plural when listing multiple items

Mutation of the human genome results in three classes of genomic variant: single nucleotide; short insertions or deletions; and large structural variants (SVs). Is this case, should genomic variant ...
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0answers
21 views

Is this an explanatory/appositive phrase, and do I need to separate it with a comma?

In the following sentence (forgive the obscure acronyms): To begin with, we search within three pixels of the predicted position to lock onto the target, using the WCS header in each FITS file to ...
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0answers
19 views

Every single logo, advert, presentation and video IS or ARE?

I know that every single is followed by singular, but what if there are different units after "every single"?
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0answers
35 views

How should a numbered list be punctuated within dialogue?

In a story, a character reads aloud a numbered list. What should the punctuation be? I was thinking of treating it like a recitation of a poem or song - indented and italicized. There are 26 items in ...
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0answers
19 views

did + present-continuous form

A conversation between me and my friend: Friend: I was sleeping when you called. And I do that everyday till 13:00. Me: ok ~3 days later he replies to me at 10:00 already~ Now my question: Is it ...
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0answers
42 views

Is the word "with" strictly necessary?

I just published a "read me" file with a piece of software I wrote. In the file, I describe an interaction between the user and the computer: Simply run: tpot http localhost:8080 and you ...
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0answers
30 views

Are they both correct?

Keep in mind either of the statements occur the next day, that is the context must be considered to be in only past tense and FYI I know "to be" is for present and "to have been" is for past so kindly ...
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1answer
55 views

Why is "strategies to cutting" correct in this sentence?

I'm reading 'When Breath Becomes Air' by the late Paul Kalanithi, and I came across the sentence: "I could see that there were two strategies to cutting the time short..." My question is why "to ...
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0answers
49 views

Reduced adverb clauses with IF and Passive voice

I want to reduce the adverb clause in this sentence: "If they were treated fairly, they wouldn't lose the game." Which of the following sentences, if any, are correct? If treated fairly, they ...
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0answers
51 views

Is it grammatically correct for titles to not have punctuation?

I was wondering (for no particular reason), is it grammatically correct for titles, including, but not limited to, the ones of questions in the websites of the Stack Exchange network, to not have ...
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0answers
45 views

I like playing together?

If I am talking about what I like to do with my friend, can I say "I like doing such-and-such together" (not "together with her") or does it have to be "WE like doing ... together"?
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0answers
207 views

Is "Based on a true story" a grammatically correct sentence?

Is "Based on a true story" a grammatically correct sentence if it was at the end of a paragraph discussing a story? I view this as a proper sentence with an implied subject and as grammatically sound. ...

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