Questions tagged [grammaticality]

This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

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"I always be myself"

Last night an actor in a YouTube advert told me "I always be myself." I don't remember the point of the ad to find it and share it here. I did search Google for "i always be myself"...
Iain Samuel McLean Elder's user avatar
-2 votes
0 answers
33 views

Which of the following two sentences is grammatically correct, and why? [migrated]

Sentence one: Has any of your employees been sick this week? Sentence two: Have any of your employees been sick this week?
user499300's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
80 views

What is the usage of "such...as that"?

Please read this sentence's example: Considering how many hundreds of statues of the great Emperor must exist in London, it is too much to suppose such a coincidence as that a promiscuous iconoclast ...
Wh Wang's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
1 answer
208 views

Is "factoral" a legitimate word, or could it be a typo?

I recently encountered the term "factoral" used twice in The Oxford Handbook of Karl Marx, without any occurrences of "factorial." Below are the excerpts for reference: "As ...
NJKDN's user avatar
  • 23
1 vote
1 answer
59 views

Count off to split into teams

In school group projects or sports, how do you command the students/players to count off 1-2-1-2-1-2 or 1-2-3-1-2-3-1-2-3 etc. to split into two or three (or more) teams, respectively? I gather you do ...
Vinski Ratalahti's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

"Recorded on it" as a subject

I am unsure if the phrase "Recorded on it" can be used as a subject. He found a blueprint. Recorded on it was a device used by the Order. Does this sound grammatically correct?
Halcyon Mo's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Impersonal infinitive? [duplicate]

I'm learning Portuguese at the moment and have come across the Impersonal Infinitive (tense, mood?). I'm told this doesn't exist in English, but I have a feeling it might! Take the sentence It's ...
Lorcán's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
55 views

Using the Present Perfect after the preposition "after" in an adverbial clause

That's basic critical thinking. But how can a critic, writing about his own encounter with the work, be responsible for unpredictable emotional responses in individual readers? But, as Scott says, ...
MickeyQ's user avatar
  • 31
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

Is there any difference in meaning in the sentence "he doesn't have a house in which to sleep" and "he doesn't have a house to sleep in" [duplicate]

Is the first sentence even grammatically correct? It just sounds weird to me.
Eduardozzz's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
87 views

A weird use of "could have" in a non-hypothetical situation [migrated]

I saw a sentence in a book that I am reading now. That seems very weird to me and I need clarification. But I choose not to enter here the exact sentence because I have zero idea on copyright laws. ...
cetinkaya's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
13 views

Is it in time or on time? [duplicate]

Is it in time or on time? How do you use it in a sentence eg I hope they would able to come in time or on time for my performance
oby's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
3 answers
487 views

Using the conjunction "when" with the Present Perfect, Present Perfect Continuous, Past Simple and the Past Continuous Tense

From a grammatical point of view, I'm trying to understand the use of these tenses in the "when" clause. I'll give you an example. All of these example sentences are from native English ...
MickeyQ's user avatar
  • 31
1 vote
1 answer
84 views

Is the double pronoun "it mine" correct in "You did it your way, now let me do it mine"?

I am a non-native English speaker, so I would just like to increase my knowledge of the language. I heard this phrase in a TV show: You did it your way, now let me do it mine. The let me do it mine ...
cc8's user avatar
  • 13
4 votes
3 answers
894 views

"Intra": can it be used just like "sub" or does it have extra nuance?

I'm editing a draft academic paper at the moment that distinguishes between the variety that exists between several groups, on one hand, and the varieties that exist within one of those groups, on the ...
James Camien McGuiggan's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
47 views

What's the difference between each sentence and are they both correct?

I had thought it would be different before I took the test. I had thought it would have been different before I took the test.
Al Shihoin's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
76 views

Are "in case there are problems" vs. "in case of problems" correct and interchangeable?

So, I'm giving my phone number to a person so that they can count on me and call me if and when they have problems in the future. Here are two sentences: Here is my number in case you have problems. ...
hey's user avatar
  • 9
0 votes
2 answers
85 views

"you might as well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb" grammatical analysis

How is the last part of "you might as well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb" grammatically correct, that is "as for a lamb"? Don't we use the structure "as for a something&...
Saim Doruklu's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

"[Father] to whom [Son] was born" is acceptable?

Is this phrase grammatically correct? Does it sound natural? [Father's Name] to whom [Son's Name] was born. My other attempts were: [Father's Name] of/from whom was born [Son's Name]. Here "...
Nova's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
101 views

What exactly is "they doctor says"?

I have been reading a manga called A Bride's Story translated by Yen Press, and on page 47, volume 13, there is this speech bubble by a woman addressed to an audience of grown-ups including the ...
Gao's user avatar
  • 491
-1 votes
2 answers
99 views

Is this Bible verse right? [closed]

I think the grammar of Matthew 18:6 in the ESV is not right. I think they have the verb agreeing with the subject of a prepositional phrase, instead of the true subject. But AI checkers say it has no ...
Maryjf's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
41 views

Placement of "for all" in "show that"

In a mathematical text, suppose that we have a statement A(n) where n is a number. My question is where the phrase "for all n" should stand in "show that": For all n[,] show that ...
Gargantuar's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
59 views

Do I need an indefinite article, talking about exposition in literature? [closed]

For example: It's only (an) exposition, but I already love the story.
venor's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
71 views

"Employees, including young ones who profess to caring about DEI…" Why "caring"?

Employees, including young ones who profess to caring about DEI, may also put material concerns ahead of moral ones if the job market tightens. Why is caring used, instead of care or be caring? is ...
user330039's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
141 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? What's the subject of this sentence? [closed]

In high school, despite studying geology, the subject felt distant and abstract, especially as a student in a mountainous region. I want to express the meaning that the person studying geology felt ...
Eve's user avatar
  • 11
3 votes
1 answer
143 views

“I don’t care if Richard Feynman (was / were) a purple leprechaun that lived in my butt!” [duplicate]

In this scene (link) from The Big Bang Theory Sheldon corrects Penny saying she forgot to use the subjunctive: Penny: Leonard, it's three o'clock in the morning! I don't care if Richard Feynman was a ...
NPS's user avatar
  • 601
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Correct terminology of Expired & Damaged Raw Materials/ Cosmetics Industry

I need the correct terminology for items/Raw materials damaged, expired, and not for use or recycling anymore specifically in storing system inventory, etc I have suggested: Spoilage Stock Inventory ...
Hneidi Leaders's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
110 views

Which is more correct: "labeled" or "labeled as"? Is either one acceptable in any context?

I've never really given this much thought, but my inclination recently has been to omit the "as" whenever I'm referring to something being labeled. Is it ever necessary to include it? When ...
Riley 's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
1 answer
98 views

Is the word shocking in this sentence being used as a gerund or present participle? And why? [duplicate]

Is the word shocking in this sentence being used as a gerund or present participle? And why? We heard shocking news. My daughter had recently taken an English test at a Korean middle school. The ...
user494662's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
111 views

Grammaticality of: “A movement subsequently rose demanding that the King ‘was’(??!) removed as the head of the Church of England”

I am wondering how the Subjunctive Mood functions in the past, considering this sentence: A movement subsequently rose demanding that the King was removed as the head of the Church of England. My ...
Didyougo's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

'line' followed by two or more numbers

I'm writing an errata list of a math paper. Which one of the following three statements is appropriate? Page 10, line 34 and 45: ... Page 10, line 34 and line 45: ... Page 10, lines 34 and 45: ...
Stephen's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

you vs yourself?

Please help me with grammaticality or acceptability of the two sentences: A) No one is better at persuading yourself than you. B) No one is better at persuading you than yourself. Which is correct?
Kim B. S.'s user avatar
1 vote
5 answers
279 views

Is this sentence correct grammatically? "My goal is speaking English well"

"My goal is speaking English well" was in my daughter's grammar test today. She chose this was wrong as it should be, "My goal is to speak English well." However, the English ...
Jun-young Park's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

Preposition on, in & against, on

Which of these statements is correct? On/In a. Lying in the bed or b. Lying on the bed Against/On a. Leaning against the wall or b. Leaning on the wall
Orlu Uche's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
41 views

Is a noun singular or plural when listing two or more of them that are numbered? [duplicate]

I was asked by someone to review a selection of portrait photos and then respond by selecting which one(s) I wanted to have printed. Each photo is labelled "Pose," followed by a letter (i.e.,...
Juan's user avatar
  • 1
-3 votes
1 answer
31 views

Policies for Growth

Ensure policies to allow for more higher paying jobs. Wanting to say we want more of the higher paying jobs.
Kat Bouchard's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
57 views

Connotation of "for" / "for the"

I asked this question on ELL and got a satisfactory answer about whether "A new material for manufacture of bricks" is a correct title for a scientific article. However, it seems that ELL is ...
Sardine's user avatar
  • 101
3 votes
4 answers
340 views

Is "There danced a man in the hall" a grammatical alternative to "A man danced in the hall"? What verbs are possible here? [duplicate]

Does the following sentence sound grammatical to you? There danced a man in the hall With the meaning: A man danced in the hall. And compare it with There died a man in the hall Which one sounds ...
Koray Nedim Özdemir's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
51 views

Conditional structure – “hadn't have gone”? “hadn't have met”? [duplicate]

Recently I saw two interviews, one with Victoria Beckham, the other one with Elton John. They were talking about their past experiences and that's the phrasing they used: But it wouldn't have ...
Dorota's user avatar
  • 9
1 vote
0 answers
10 views

What will be the passive voice sentences for these sentences? [closed]

How many men are there? How much milk he buys? There are books. It is a toy. Books are there.
raj rajput's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
123 views

Can the adverb "perfectly" modify the verb "to be"?

Such students may be perfectly at home with the language of an ode or a classical play, [...] [Source] In a formal written language, isn't it grammatically incorrect to use, instead of an adjective, ...
TROUZINE Abderrezaq's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
204 views

Parsing "…including a problem…, in a characteristically diffident aside, he noted his own 'fleeting vain attempts' to resolve it"

Prologue to a book which I was reading ends with this verbatim copy-pasted text: A book should be dedicated to someone living, so that the dedication can give pleasure. I have dedicated this book to ...
Prem's user avatar
  • 4,736
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

"He promised" [...] "that he will" or "that he would"? [duplicate]

He promised that he will help me with my homework. He promised [that] he would help me with my homework. Which sentence is grammatically correct? I saw this debate and I genuinely don't know the ...
Rea's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
2 answers
277 views

Is it grammatical to say "... is both popular and has presented ...'

This particular example comes from a peer-reviewed publication with authors who seem to be native speakers: This trend is both popular and has presented a variety of challenges I wonder if this is ...
MWB's user avatar
  • 1,356
1 vote
3 answers
109 views

Is this awkward reuse of a verb between subjects correct?

From a Library of Congress article about Freud: ...patients tended to perform for the camera and doctors to record the most photogenic. This sentence seems to reuse the verb tended between the ...
japreiss's user avatar
  • 547
0 votes
2 answers
104 views

Which is correct? "I suggest mum (to) invite my auntie" [duplicate]

Which is correct? I suggest mum invite my auntie for dinner. or I suggest mum to invite my auntie for dinner. Is it the same rule on I (recommend)?
Ammar darwish's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
117 views

Is it grammatical to say "a request met with refusal"?

I've been going over some English comprehension tests with my students and I've stumbled upon a sentence that's been bugging me. (Jack / request / have) ______ a day off met with his employer’s ...
Kacper's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
88 views

Hyphenation of compound adjective or quantifier when referring back to antecedent

Example: She ate one or more apples, and each apple of the one-or-more apples was either red or green. In the example, if "one or more apples" is the antecedent, should the reference back (i....
etisdale's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
69 views

Present perfect or past tense in the first part?

Are the following two sentences grammatically correct? Mark has been injured while he was training. While Mark was training, he has injured himself. I am particularly interested in the correct tense ...
Abziik's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

Should it be "many other prizes" or "many more prizes" [closed]

When advertising prizes in a Christmas raffle, should we use "and many other prizes" or "and many more prizes" after listing the 3 top prizes in the draw?
Deborah Walker's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
957 views

What is the grammatical role of the last line of Gray's 'Elegy'?

The last line of Thomas Gray's poem 'Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard' is 'The bosom of his Father and his God." Here rests his head upon the lap of Earth A youth to Fortune and to Fame ...
EulerSpoiler's user avatar

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