Questions tagged [grammaticality]

This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

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They’d been going out for 2 month when they decided to end it [migrated]

Which sentence is correct, or, at least, the one that sounds natural? They’d been going out for 2 months when they decided to end it. It'd been 2 months since they started going out and decided to ...
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Can someone arrange this very sentences with a grammatical diagram? [closed]

The posts you share here on your timeline have good articles with better experiences and wonderful pictures, I feel ecstatic in going through your page worth disseminating, this is my first time ...
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What Verbs can Gerunds Follow?

Throughout my life, I have relied on intuition to ensure that my sentences are intelligible and grammatical. I like using gerunds because they can shorten sentences and avoid redundancy. Recently, ...
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Is the given structure grammatically correct? [migrated]

I am learning English as a second language and came across the following text which sounded to me to be having some sort of disagreement in overall structure. The first part of the sentence contains “...
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2 votes
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Why is 'a' used in "There's a good many reasons why people should follow it"? [duplicate]

There's a good many reasons why people should follow it. Why is there an 'a' before 'good many reasons'?
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2 votes
2 answers
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Can the predeterminer "half" comfortably occur before plural nouns without determiners?

So "half" belongs to a special class of words known as "predeterminers", those that can occur before determiners: Half a century Half the people in this company can't speak a ...
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"While + Past Simple" or "While + Past Continuous" [migrated]

Question : Last night, while they (sleep), a burglar broke into their house. Answer A : Last night, while they slept, a burglar broke into their house. Or Answer B : Last night, while they was ...
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"Preparing children for uncertainties keeps or keep them in readiness to face any challenges" Which is correct? [migrated]

This is a question from sentence improvement. Answer given in answer key is "Preparing children for uncertainties keeps them in readiness to face any challenges". I think the answer is wrong ...
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1 answer
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Ok to write "motivation" as possessed by a program instead of program's creator?

Let's say group X developed a program (or club, business, group, etc.) given some underlying motivation. The program was successful thus affirming said motivation. I'm curious: can the more concise ...
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1 vote
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“Would not have” + past participle in a real reflection [closed]

Here is the situation: If there had been an apple, I wouldn’t have eaten it. ...is understood to mean: There wasn’t an apple; I therefore didn’t eat it. Building on this, can we use the imaginary ...
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Object pronouns in subject position? [duplicate]

I found this old question in SE-ELL, particularly the comments on the last (Hector von's) answer, and it stirred my curiosity about the usage of object pronouns in subject position. I believe that in ...
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2 votes
4 answers
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Does this sentence have a subject?

The following is a paragraph from an online article: I don’t know whether Closca will succeed in this: although its foldable bike helmet is available in some outlets in New York, including the Museum ...
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What is the utmost opposite of Ultimate that requires no prefix? [closed]

So I've been reading some English words originating from Latin. Okay, I checked and found the best definition that fits Ultimate which is: A final or fundamental fact or principle If above is the ...
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2 answers
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"Not just [he/him], but [she/her] is leaving this year"?

How do I correctly write sentences like these: "Not just [he/him], but [she/her] is leaving this year"? I'm unsure whether to use an object or subject pronoun. I've come to learn that in ...
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-2 votes
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Which is grammatically correct "yesterday with these people" or "yesterday with this people"? [duplicate]

I added "yesterday with these people" to my Instagram story, then my friend corrected me that it should be "this" and I told my other friend and she said that I am still ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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“a small number of” as an adjective

The official Australian government page https://www.nationalsecurity.gov.au/national-threat-level/current-national-terrorism-threat-level features the following quote. This is because there are a ...
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Is “Do you be?” a grammatical and meaningful sentence in present-day English? [duplicate]

Suppose you were asked the question: Do you be? I wonder what you would understand it to mean, and I wonder how you would answer it.
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1 vote
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The difference between the usage of for in two different tenses!

There are two sentences that seem close to one another, yet somehow feel different. Since I am not a native speaker I thought that presenting the sentences here may shed some light on the matter. Take ...
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"All of the time" or "All the time"? [duplicate]

I always thought the phrase was "All of the time", but I don't see anyone saying/typing that anymore. I only hear/see "All the time". Is the latter correct?
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Need grammar books that I can learn this sentences' grammar [migrated]

I've already studied some grammar books still I'm confused when I see such sentences: The list goes on and on, with the Devil being expressed in ever more subtle tones. These are political sermon ...
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At all of these aspects VS in all these aspects

Let's say you want to talk about similarities that chess and life have in common, and how different aspects that apply to one thing also apply to the other. "In chess as in life, you will need ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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"She bore a child" vs "She gave birth to a child"

The sentence "She gave birth to a child" or "She had a child" is normal. But the verb ‘bear‘ also means ‘to give birth to young‘. Therefore, is the sentence "She bore a child&...
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2 answers
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Is "temporary substitute" redundant?

Is "temporary substitute" redundant? For example, Mrs. Williams is the temporary substitute teacher. Would "temporary substitute" be redundant in this case? According to Merriam-...
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Is this verb tense correct?: She is gonna teach the extra parts THAT he didn't tell you [migrated]

She is gonna teach the extra parts that he didn't tell you I've been googling with this over an hour; verb tense rules after the word "that" in a sentence but couldn't find any of related ...
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1 vote
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"Of all the students, none [is/are] as attentive as he is"? "she asks all 5 of them, none [knows/know] the answer"? [duplicate]

In the sentence "I asked all 5 of them, none [knows/know] the answer", should I use the plural or singular verb? For reference, I found this website that explains it: https://editorsmanual....
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-1 votes
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A simple question on when to use "these" and when "those" while writing [migrated]

Given: You will be needing the following three things for your trip: The first thing. The second thing. The third thing. In reference to the three things just now listed above, which one here is ...
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Does present participle without comma always modifies preceding noun or noun phrase? [migrated]

When reading the newspaper, I came across this sentence: Then, Google’s Threat Analysis Group (TAG) put out a detailed blog post last week explaining how they believed Hermit was being used to target ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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"It's not true what they said. They're lying." Why are we using Present Continuous here? They have already lied, so why?

I don't understand why we use Present Continous there, because the action has already ended, "they have already lied".
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0 votes
1 answer
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The position of 'to a great extent'

I have read an article using the phrase 'to a great extent', Perception, abstract cognition, emotional processes, memory, and social interaction all appear to proceed to a great extent without the ...
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2 answers
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Is there a literal (non-figurative) meaning of "to turn the corner"?

I'm editing a book, and the author wrote the following sentence (emphasis added): If she walked straight past the next six stands, then turned the corner at her right, then turned again, and then ...
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1 vote
1 answer
22 views

"..., not less so." [closed]

Here is a sentence I found in the official guide to the TOEFL iBT test. Well, I personally think that the Great Depression of the 1930s actually makes this more understandable, not less so. I found ...
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Why is the sentence "Wall-to-wall carpets in every room is their dream" acceptable?

I saw this sentence in the CoGEL(Quirk et al). 15.16 Verbless clause: Wall-to-wall carpets in every room is their dream. Question: Why is this awkward sentence acceptable? It's obvious that it ...
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5 answers
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Is starting your sentence with “Which is why...” grammatically correct?

Is starting your sentence with “Which is why...” grammatically correct? …our brain is still busy processing all the information coming from the phones. Which is why it is impossible to actually rest ...
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Please pronounce Eunice's

Is there ever an exception to the rule of pronouncing the s after a singular possessive name or word? So, is Eunice's ever pronounced simply Eunice, or is the s always pronounced?
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1 vote
0 answers
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Can I use different pronouns in a sentence? [closed]

Q:Why do the monsters scare the children? A:Because they can get electricity to light up their city from their screams. Can I use different pronouns in a sentence? Thank you:)
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Referencing the parts of a function - the "sub function" level, or "sub functional" level?

Here's the sentence I'm not sure how to write: I will show you how to write code of the highest standard, in the sub-function level. What I mean by that is I will show how to write the parts of ...
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1 answer
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Is it okay to start a sentence with an appositive?

I know you can use them in the middle of a sentence, but is it okay to start sentences with them? Example: A kind of a duck, the Mallard, can be found all throughout the world.
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6 votes
2 answers
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Why is “learning hard” wrong yet “studying hard” is right?

Why does saying learning hard sound so terribly wrong and unnatural, given that working hard, exercising hard, listening hard, thinking hard, and even it rains hard sound perfectly natural and get ...
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Is "all the above" a valid phrase to use in a sentence? [duplicate]

I have just discovered such a wonderful thing as determiners. I did a little digging and found out a lot about the stuff, but there is one thing that still confuses me. Is "all the above" a ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Issue with word 'incentives'

I am proofreading some documentation, and this sentence bothers me: This incentives users to install the app. Is the use of 'incentives' here grammatically incorrect? Are these two alternatives ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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Grammatically correct way to restart a thought in a single sentence

There exists an oratory technique where a sentence or thought that might be highly complex, too complex even to risk maintaining the listeners' understanding throughout it, where such a complex ...
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1 answer
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Is it possible to take a whole for some collective unit words with a verb agreement in the singular form? [duplicate]

At the beginning of English learning, a simple sentence looks like this below: There is a group of students singing and dancing.... However if it's changed to: A group of students are singing and ...
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3 votes
2 answers
210 views

Is "none" when used alone without antecedent singular or plural (for context, I'm talking about people): "None [are/is] here"?

I know that "none of [...]" can be both singular or plural, but when I use it alone in a sentence, without the "of" and without any other nouns, can it be both singular and plural ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Grammatical correctness of "He hasn't punished one of them— not one of them— since baby is born," [duplicate]

So I was reading a story called 'Desiree's Baby' and I saw this sentence appear, when one character (Desiree) was telling her mother that her husband was so happy upon the birth of her child, that he ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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When ‘that’ follows an 𝒳-of-𝒴 subject, which noun phrase does ‘that’ refer to: the first noun phrase 𝒳 or the second noun phrase 𝒴?

I’ve seen those two quite dif­fer­ent us­ages of that fol­low­ing an 𝒳-of-𝒴 prepo­si­tional phrase con­nect­ing two noun phrases 𝒳 and 𝒴 via the prepo­si­tion of, one in which it is used to re­fer ...
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1 answer
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Require not vs. require do not

Which one is correct? I'm confused about whether I should say "require that someone does not do something" or "require that someone not do something" The Insurance Bureau requires ...
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1 vote
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Real Conditional Clause Plus Present Unreal Main Clause

Is it grammatical to say these four sentences? If I have studied it for four years, I should be good at it. If I had studied it for four years, I should be good at it. If I have been studying it ...
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Can "is" in "is a" be omitted?

Can the "is" in the following sentence be omitted? "Those who think a cure for Alzheimer's Disease is a possibility must act now."
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-1 votes
2 answers
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What is the word to express 'remove the need for'?

Creating a spare disk will remove the need for more disk space. What is the replacement for 'remove the need for'?
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0 votes
1 answer
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Is it correct to say “things are looking up for my travel plans” [closed]

Is it correct to say “things are looking up for my travel plans” to indicate that I am ready to start planning my travel after so many problems.
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