Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for questions about morphology and syntax, the two elements of grammar. DO NOT USE THIS TAG IF YOUR QUESTION IS ABOUT WHETHER SOMETHING SPECIFIC IS GRAMMATICAL. For such cases use the 'grammaticality' tag. Also do not use this for punctuation or spelling (orthography); those are not about grammar, and they have their own tags.

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11
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2answers
471 views

'For' is a coordinating conjunction, but 'because' is a subordinating conjunction. Is that right? Can someone explain why?

He went to bed, for he was tired. (For = coordinating conjunction) He went to bed, because he was tired. (Because = subordinating conjunction) Is this correct? If so, I'm confused. In all the examples ...
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0answers
37 views

Grammar Explanation

How to differentiate between the use of Much as adverb and pronoun when it is used after verb?? Is there any easy tricks? It costs much. (Much=pronoun) Has he changed much.(much=adverb)
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0answers
26 views

How would I say “Time it takes to fall after casting” as short as possible?

As said in the title. The "Time it takes to fall after casting" is only for a title and should not show a time.
4
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1answer
117 views

Term for intentional inaccuracies that better convey meaning?

Is there a term or concept that describes instances where an author/speaker intentionally or knowingly uses wrong spelling/pronunciation/grammar because it better conveys the intended meaning, and is ...
0
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0answers
65 views

Is personal pronoun followed with “verb+ing” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

Is the sentence below correct? What type of pronoun is "You" in this case? You staring won’t make me walk faster Below is the result from an online grammar check on the sentence as shown: ...
0
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1answer
32 views

Questioned vs asked

The examiner questioned who the first man to fly in space was. or The examiner asked who the first man to fly in space was. Are both correct? Does using one instead of another affect its meaning in ...
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0answers
29 views

Should/may there be a comma before “which” in this sentence?

In sentence below, is a comma before "which" (1) necessary / (2) acceptable? It consists of a single table called Table A, followed by three further tables which are the following: Table B, ...
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0answers
33 views

Confused about why some formations with “neither/either” are incorrect

Canada does not require that U.S. citizens obtain passports to enter the country, and Mexico doesn't either. My question is why would these be incorrect if we use them after "and" as it is: ...
0
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1answer
30 views

I was not directly involved vs I had not directly involved vs I did not directly involve?

Could you please help me to understand the context of these three phrases and where they can be used? I was not directly involved with ... I had not directly involved with ... I did not directly ...
1
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1answer
105 views

Comma Galore. How do I punctuate “however” in this sentence?

The importance of this piece, however, is probably better demonstrated in how much it has assisted me to be a photographer. Maybe it should be like this? The importance of this piece, however is ...
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0answers
46 views

Has 'being' been omitted? [duplicate]

In 2018 about 50,000 people were involved in it, most of them part­ time or seasonal staff working from small offices in rural areas. Should there be a "being" between "most of them"...
1
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1answer
93 views

Grammar of “all are agreed”?

The oft-used phrase "all are agreed" doesn't make grammatical sense to me. It means "all agree" or "all agreed", or even "all are agreeing", with "all"...
0
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2answers
77 views

When someone asks 'No milk?' How should I answer if I don't want milk? [duplicate]

At the cafe.. I : Coffee please. Staff : No milk? In that case, how should I answer if I don't want milk? No. Yes.
1
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1answer
56 views

Using apostrophe + s and “the” - is it incorrect and why?

I saw a colleague writing: Can you add the new option in the Salesforce’s panel? English is my second language, but my intuition tells me that using the with 's in this situation is incorrect and ...
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0answers
26 views

Confusion with plural usage form [duplicate]

So I'm quite confused as to what word do I use in these sentences: That equates to almost over 136,000 cars needing "repairs/repair". DIY hail damage repair kits really "isn't/aren't&...
46
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10answers
7k views

Around 1960 in Britain “Have you a camera?” or “Do you have a camera?”

Around 1960, when we began learning English in Japan, we were taught British English. To our great surprise, we were forced to change into American English in the next grade. Japanese English teachers ...
0
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0answers
25 views

What type of phrase is the highlighted part in the following sentence? [duplicate]

She asked (me) a difficult question.
0
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1answer
29 views

The car's engine or the car engine? [duplicate]

Is there a rule of thumb on how to deal with apostrophies in the following cases? Group name vs. Group's name Car brand vs. Car's brand And pretty much anything similar.
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0answers
33 views

Having a hard time with the present tense for informative situations

Ok imagine you're somewhere to fix things(e.g. there is a ticket), and then you need to update the status that you fixed it, for example an IP(internet protocol), should I use present tense or past ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Is the included sentence about party planning grammatically correct?

Is it correct to write the following? Since you have asked me about the planning of a farewell party for your English teacher, I’m happy to help you with some suggestions. Is there any way to ...
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0answers
45 views

Is deep the opposite of shallow?

I came across a text today that suggested that deep is the opposite of shallow but I found this difficult to digest. Furthermore, it feels one could use shallow as the opposite of deep but not vice ...
0
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0answers
47 views

Question words as subjects

I am going to teach a Celta lesson on indirect questions. Amongst the indirect questions there's one which is a question with a question word as the subject: Who cleans the house where you live? ...
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0answers
59 views

Why is this sentence grammatically incorrect?

I have been practicing sample tests for an English Olympiad and came across such a question: Decide if the sentence is correct or incorrect. After you make your payment, the products will be sent to ...
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6answers
988 views

Why is “gymnastics” plural, “swimming” conjugated and “sport” singular? Is this even correct? [closed]

If this has been previously asked I'd be delighted to be pointed to that answer but despite searching I can't find an explanation. I'm trying to construct some lexemes to describe sports. It's ...
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0answers
31 views

If one presidential term is four years, how do you say two terms in terms of years? Two four years's?

If one presidential term is four years, how do you say two terms in terms of years? Two four years's? Two four years doesn't make a lot of sense but two four years's sounds weird.
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0answers
25 views

Usage of it and them with the same noun

Here is an example situation where the noun refers to something in general- (General statement) The coconut tree is my favourite tree. It can grow up to a height of 25 meters. (1) I used to climb them ...
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0answers
11 views

What do we call “down” in this sentence? [duplicate]

"I have fallen down." I thought adjective at first, but it isn't really an adjective right? Because it doesn't really modify me, it modifies how I fell? So it is modifying the verb.
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1answer
43 views

“We've determined that you have” or “We've determined you have” - and why?

Apologies if this is an existing question. I am not familiar with the terminology required to tag this appropriately or come up with keywords for the search. Something along the lines of accusative ...
0
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1answer
68 views

Do the words “mommy and daddy” in the following paragraph need to be in plural? [closed]

I saw the young faces of several 10/12-year-old girls slowly turning purple with a pair of large tightening hands wrapped around their tiny porcelain necks. Tears were streaming down their soft silky ...
0
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0answers
52 views

Everyone vs. Anyone

As everyone cuts it as well as he does, I always have my hair cut at Johnson's. Or As anyone cuts it as well as he does, I always have my hair cut at Johnson's. Which one is correct?
0
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1answer
51 views

Subordinate clauses in sentences

I have a question about using subordinate clauses. Here are the following examples: This book is about how to control your emotions in difficult situations; How they love each other is felt even ...
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0answers
30 views

Comma or no comma: “…save for the last digit [,] which is 2.”

Comma or no comma: "11112 is a number whose digits are all 1, save for the last digit [,] which is 2. My sentence is of the following form: Comma or no comma: "11112 is a number whose ...
0
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0answers
21 views

what does “Google to pay Apple $12B to remain Safari's default search.” mean? [duplicate]

I could not understand this part of the sentence : "Google to pay". I googled it by typing "Subject + to + verb" but could not find anything. Thanks in advance for your answers.
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0answers
36 views

English complement

I have this sentence below: I can picture him now, sitting at his desk pilled high with manuscripts and reference books, leaning back in his chair and looking out of the window while a cigarette ...
0
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4answers
77 views

In American English, shouldn't “gotten” be used as a part participle? [closed]

I live in the US. I sometimes hear some Americans say I haven't got a response yet. This sounds wrong to me; in American English (unlike British English) one would say I haven't gotten a response ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Is it true that it's OK to omit the pluperfect (past-perfect) in casual speech?

The pluperfect is used to indicate what is relatively earlier than the compared clause. But in conversation I hear people omit it all the time. Examples: I haven't spoken to the President since the ...
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0answers
32 views

Singular/plural juxtaposition ? (“… was remarks …”)

There are many questions here on singular and plural controversies and one thing I have noticed is that many of these apparent contradictions are resolvable by grammar. However, sometimes, the ear (...
0
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1answer
41 views

Can we say “I am looking forward to being a doctor”, or is that wrong?

Can we say "I am looking forward to being a doctor", or is it wrong like this?
0
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0answers
28 views

Is this sentence correct? I am confused

"When are we going to appreciate that vaccines are the single greatest human invention, that have saved billions of lives." Is it right to use the singular "invention" here? If ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

Whatever: pronoun, conjunction or determiner?

I have already learned what is the general difference between conjunctions and conjuncting pronouns, and that is the fact that a pronoun can be a subject or an object in the clause whereas a ...
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0answers
14 views

“There are” or “there is”? [duplicate]

"There are Mary and Nat" "There's Mary and Nat" Which sentence is correct and why? Thanks in advance!
0
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2answers
33 views

When a substitute response is given, although it does not address the main issue, is called?

This is not done to evade the question, but rather offered perhaps in consolation. Such as when one is looking for the doctor, who is currently out of reach, and you say, "how about I give you a ...
0
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0answers
16 views

Can/Should I put a comma before “for” in this sentence?

China’s domestic brands have made huge strides in the years since 2012, creating new features and products that take into account what Chinese users want, for a small fraction of the price. i can't ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Use of “X can be Y only if Z are”

Example: Your conclusion can be withdrawn only if your prior papers are. Is repeating the verb at the end required? Like: Your conclusion can be withdrawn only if your prior papers are withdrawn. ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Why use 'can' in this sentence?

1 ) I CAN hear a strange noise. What is it? 2 ) Some people are unlucky. Life CAN be very unfair. I think could is used instead of can, but it isn't right. So I want to surely know it, what is ...
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2answers
53 views

What is the difference in meaning when we use a gerund instead of a bare infinitive after the preposition “to”? [closed]

Example: "I devoted so much time to learning this skill." And "I devoted so much time to learn this skill."
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0answers
18 views

Cocktail of chemical compounds robustly promoting cell reprogramming protects liver against acute injury [duplicate]

I would like to edit this journal article title to make it sound better Which one is the best option? Cocktail of chemical compounds which robustly promotes cell reprogramming protects liver against ...
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0answers
19 views

For a long time (future)-Usage

I am looking to tell my group of long-time friends, that the meet up they had last week (which I missed) would hopefully not be the last one for at least the next several months. Would it be fine to ...
0
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1answer
45 views

About “First come, first served.”

I know "served" is a past participle, but what about "come?" Is it a verb, a bare infinitive, or a past participle?
0
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1answer
23 views

Mixing noun and verb in conjunction

Having a watch is essential for looking good and timeliness. Disregarding the content of the above sentence, is it grammatically correct? To me it feels improper that "looking good" uses a ...

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