Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for questions about morphology and syntax, the two elements of grammar. DO NOT USE THIS TAG IF YOUR QUESTION IS ABOUT WHETHER SOMETHING SPECIFIC IS GRAMMATICAL. For such cases use the 'grammaticality' tag. Also do not use this for punctuation or spelling (orthography); those are not about grammar, and they have their own tags.

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rather and past events [closed]

in a movie a hitman gives a man's wife two choices: A "he could lose his toe" B "he can lose two front teeth" ... and the woman goes for the toe choice. when then hitman leaves ...
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Impossible could have

I killed a monster using my gun yesterday. Say it was impossible for any other weapon to kill the monster. The gun was the only solution capable of killing it. "No other weapon could have killed ...
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26 views

Does taking elements out of a that-clause change the meaning?

Example sentences I came up with: A) He told me that I had to do it despite not wanting to. B) He told me that, despite not wanting to, I had to do it. C) Despite not wanting to, he told me that I ...
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Reduced relative clause with adverbial clause/phrase [duplicate]

People who, before their friends arrive, like spending time on the phone are normal these days. (relative clause with adverbial clause) Students who, after completing their lessons, go playing ...
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33 views

Why do we use a singular noun which is related to more than one person? [duplicate]

Why isn’t “mobile phone” plural in the following sentence? 70 percent of the population of the world own a mobile phone.
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1 vote
0 answers
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Multiple introductory word elements and commas [duplicate]

I am struggling with the punctuation of sentences with multiple introductory elements. Example 1: However, at the current development stage, this feature is not implemented. Example 2: However, in ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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How to tell if a clause is interpreted perfectively or imperfecitvely?

In A Student's Introduction to English Grammar, they define a perfective clause as: a clause describes a situation in a way that considers it as a whole, in its totality, without reference to any ...
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2 votes
3 answers
172 views

Gerund or Infinitive after an adjective

I came across the following test exercise on Gerunds and Infinitives. The Oscar-winning actor avoids talking to his fans and refuses to give his autograph. <more context>. Doesn't he seem way ...
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1 vote
1 answer
33 views

Are these sentences existential?

I am studying existential there, but I am not sure if the following sentences are exemple of existential sentences. All sentences come from Oscar Wilde's A house of pomegranates, available at Project ...
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2 votes
3 answers
92 views

What does the preposition "to" mean in these sentences?

The tissue sample is cut with scissors just distal to the ligature. The tissue distal to the suture is cut with a scalpel blade. There's an adorable waitress at the coffee shop next to my house. The ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Can you skip "to" in "was to verb" format? [duplicate]

In the first series of "Diary of wimpy kid" there is a following graph Today we had Phys Ed, so the first thing I did when I got outside was sneak off to the basketball court to if the ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Is a main clause containing subordination canonical or non-canonical?

According to Huddleston and Pullum's A Student's Introduction to English Grammar, canonical clauses are: those which are syntactically the most basic or elementary. They mark subordinate clauses, ...
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Using the word "inform" as a synonym for "instruct" - Is this wrong?

I work in a section of my organization that involves writing of technical documents. Our organization recently put out a policy to avoid using the word "instruct" when referring to our ...
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To be + gerund with agent as subject complement

My friend asks: Why didn't you come to the party last night? I say: The reason was my roommate feeling sick, so I had to stay home and take care of him. I wonder, is it correct to use: subject + to ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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To be +gerund with agent

Is it correct to say? It was me working on my car that was causing annoying sounds. Me working on my car – gerund (with agent) as subject complement. That was causing annoying sounds – relative ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
85 views

Adjective use after nouns: with and without that-clause [closed]

Let us take a look at these adjectives: able, similar, capable, ready, etc. We are free to stick them to the back of any noun thus avoiding using that/who-clause, like in these examples: Presumably, ...
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1 answer
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Difference between "long/hope for A to do"

The following two phrases are both perfectly correct: long for your return hope for your return but only the first of the following phrases sounds correct: long for you to return hope for you to ...
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0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Conjunction reduction and singular/plural ambiguity [duplicate]

There is one XYZ formulation and one ABC formulation. The original statement is: […] that allows for a comparison between the XYZ formulation and the ABC formulation. Which of the following mean the ...
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Is '…by our having used…' grammatically sound? [duplicate]

Is '…by our having used…' grammatically sound in this sentence? The internal validity of our study is strengthened by our having used multiple research methods.
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Due to/because of [duplicate]

...does happen due to...; didn't happen due to; Carpal tunnel syndrome 'doesn't occur due to, but because of...extended use', for example. So, do any of those sound right — even if they're all wrong? ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
41 views

Can an independent clause be interrupted by a conjunction without a comma and still be an independent clause? [closed]

Can an independent clause be interrupted by a conjunction without a comma and still be an independent clause? e.g.: He poured me another drink and I drank it. or: Max climbed onto his horse and we ...
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0 votes
1 answer
57 views

Use of "proven" [duplicate]

I am wondering if the following sentence is grammatically correct. The feasibility of algorithm A and the high performance of algorithm B is proven by a number of experiments. I would like to avoid ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
139 views

Does 10+ include 10? [closed]

If you look on the internet it says 10+ does not include 10 but if you look at Wikipedia it says it does include 10. Which one is correct?
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1 answer
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so vs and so difference

He was ill and so he was rejected. He was ill so he was rejected. Which of the above sentences is correct? So and And so mean the same. Kindly clarify.
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'The punch of keys' or 'the punches of keys'?

No need to delay The punch of keys That crunch of ease As if the screen didn't freeze This is a poem I'm writing. I need punch to go with crunch. The problem is, it probably has to be 'the punches of ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
40 views

See 10+ means 11,12…. Right? [closed]

See 10+ means 11,12…. Right? So if you say you have a 10+ relationship with your cousin is 10-11 years or 11-12 years because when I turn one year old I will have 1 years less but when my cousin turns ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Is the phrase “Undefeatable challenge” completely wrong, or is it acceptable under certain circumstances?

Normally, the verb defeat cannot be applied to challenge, and the phrase seems like a semantic mistake: you can defeat an opponent, but you can beat a challenge. But there's a character who's over-...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Friends car seized [closed]

Lets say I was driving my friends set of wheels and the police seized it yesterday for inconsiderate driving. Today, my friend complains: Why did you drive like a lunatic? Im going to have to pay ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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In absence of or in the absence of

I am wondering whether the first phrase is correct? It seems to be in use ( based on Google searches). If it is, in what cases should we use it instead of the form with 'the'? Thank you!
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0 votes
1 answer
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There is much of the cast and crew being like a family

I was reading a film review on the newly-released documentary Harry Potter 20th anniversary until one sentence caught me out: Chats among the three main stars, Daniel Radcliffe (Harry himself), Emma ...
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0 votes
4 answers
262 views

“Only use” vs “use only”

Would one say they “typically only use public transportation” or “typically use only public transportation” inverting the order ? This is to settle an argument between my friends.
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10 votes
2 answers
365 views

The opposite approaches to make plural form for nouns and verbs

I'm just curious if this is just a coincidence that we make plural nouns by adding '-s', but we do exactly the opposite for verbs - we add '-s' to a verb to make a singular form and we leave it ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Sooner or later my dear friend messi

As you might know Lionel Messi left FC Barcelona a few months ago. A few months later and right now I'm discussing his departure with my friend. My friend asks: Why didn't the club renew Messi's ...
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0 votes
2 answers
31 views

Preposition “To” after “and”

I’m confused: “He expressed his gratitude to the Ministry and to the international organisations” Should I use “to” after “and” in this sentence? “He expressed his gratitude to the Government and ...
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3 answers
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Is there a general rule for a phrase like "I am not a big movie person"? [closed]

I've been trying to find a general rule for these sorts of expressions: I've never been a big movie person. He's never been a big New Year’s resolution person. I can't find any dictionary or grammar ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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What is the correct structure to use in a sentence containing 'once' as the subordinate conjunction? [closed]

In a sentence containing a conjunction, what are the correct verb forms to be used in the two clauses? For example: I would also suggest that once all these items are established, they must be added ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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present simple/present continuous

I'm wondering if my sentences are correct in terms of the tenses used. In particular, I'm curious about the parts in bold. Thanks for any comments. When a person talks to another person and the ...
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Proper Grammar of Degree Abbreviations

I have seen plenty of abbreviation options to write Postgraduate Diploma. Just to mention the easiest finding on the web: "A postgraduate diploma (PgD, PgDip, PGDip, PG Dip., PGD, Dipl. PG, PDE) ...
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Can you omit the propositions "to", "as I", "as we" or "in order to" before a verb?

Here in Ghana, I've noticed a growing trend of people using phrases like: "Come, join us celebrate the goodness of God." or "This is to enable GRIDco undertake the stringing of ...
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1 answer
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Is reverberate a dialogue tag? [closed]

Just like the title say and here are the examples: “Took you long enough.” Without warning, her voice reverberated from my side. “Ngh! Phew… Oh no!” A voice reverberated from the crash site and ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What is the grammatical term (or terms) for this 'object-subject' between two verbs? [duplicate]

I saw the dog bite the stick. “I” is clearly the subject. “stick” is clearly a direct object. But there are two verbs: “saw” “bite” And “the dog” is: the object of “saw” the subject of “bite” ...
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3 votes
1 answer
87 views

Could someone tell me how to use ‘that which’ together in a sentence? [closed]

I’ve read various sentences in which ‘that which’ is used together.
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1 vote
1 answer
48 views

"Emma and us" in sentence

Are those sentences grammatically correct? "We want Emma (and us) to be part of it." "This is where Emma (and us) want to stay." maybe the second one should be "and we"...
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-1 votes
1 answer
32 views

Grammatically analyze "Why drivers were left stranded" [closed]

Grammatically analyze below Why drivers were left stranded. "Why" is the interrogative, but not sure if it is describing drivers. "Were left" is the verb, but not sure the ...
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3 votes
2 answers
116 views

find sth to doing?

I saw this sentence in Rick & Morty We just found a back door to getting off this rock. I'm confused why the "ing" was used here? Shouldn't it be "to get off"? Can anyone ...
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0 votes
0 answers
65 views

"Last but not Least" or "The last but not the least"?

Is it because, in most cases, we use "last but not least" after mentioning some items that don't add "The" to the phrase? or is it just an accepted exception? Shouldn't the correct ...
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1 vote
1 answer
53 views

An analysis of a sentence

I just wonder if anyone could help me understand the differences between the following original excerpt gleaned from the latest The Economist as follows : One aspect of hammam culture proving ...
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1 answer
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How does the grammar work behind "How [adjective] [subject] [verb] [object]"?

Sorry for the poorly worded title. I came across this excerpt while reading, and I really feel like it should be gramatically incorrect. The sentence structure in the title fits for the part before ...
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-2 votes
3 answers
103 views

Please explain the meaning in the context [closed]

Question: I have been told by my instructor that you need to question who or what to the verb to get the direct object. Also she said that wherever there are prepositional phrases there is no object. ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
62 views

I was wondering if this sentence was correct [closed]

Yesterday as I was watching Friends, I came across a sentence that sounded weird. The sentence was: He pretend, he don't hear me. I think that the actress had made a mistake.Am I right?
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