Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for questions about morphology and syntax, the two elements of grammar. DO NOT USE THIS TAG IF YOUR QUESTION IS ABOUT WHETHER SOMETHING SPECIFIC IS GRAMMATICAL. For such cases use the 'grammaticality' tag. Also do not use this for punctuation or spelling (orthography); those are not about grammar, and they have their own tags.

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4
votes
2answers
155 views

Graded/ungraded adjectives and grading/non-grading adverbs

I saw in the Farlex Grammar Book an explanation of gradable adjectives and graded adverbs. It lists the following words as examples of each category: Gradable adjectives small cold hot difficult sad ...
3
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1answer
28 views

Conjunctions, coordinators

I really know that for the levels of studying English language, we had always said that "for" is a coordinator. However, I would like to know what for serves in this sentence For God so loved the ...
3
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1answer
130 views

Why are numbers exempt from the less vs. fewer rule?

The way I tend to apply the less vs. fewer rule is: If I can count it, it's fewer - (Drink fewer glasses of water.) If I can't count it, it's less - (Drink less water.) But when it comes to numbers ...
3
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2answers
637 views

By which, to which, at which, to whom. are these Relative pronouns in Adjective cluase?

From experience, I know that: which, who, where, why, whom, there, that are relative pronouns but I wonder about the expressions: 'by which', 'to which', 'at which', 'to whom Are ...
3
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1answer
152 views

Confusing syntax in sentences with indirect object complements

Some verbs produce unambiguous syntax when used with an indirect object. I brought a toy to Katy. --> I brought Katy a toy. I bought flowers for my wife. --> I bought my wife flowers. ...
3
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1answer
284 views

Like as a preposition and prepositional phrase sub categorization rules

I'm trying to figure out how the sentence "My hands are shaking like crazy," breaks down into lexical categories. I know "like" can function as a preposition, meaning "similar to", but I'm not sure if ...
3
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1answer
245 views

A few miles into the town — verbless clause, or adverbial phrase?

A few miles into the town, I saw a beautiful building that was now abandoned. I don't know if "a few miles into the town" is a verbless clause like this (Being) a few miles into the town, I saw a ...
3
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1answer
281 views

What part of speech is the word “entire” in “over the little garden field entire”?

The sentence is: "After a while she got up from where she was and went over the little garden field entire." A quote from Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. I want to know if the ...
3
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1answer
318 views

In which context should I use reduced relative clauses?

As I should write essays and other kinds of writings in an academic style, I was wondering whether reduced relative clauses are formal or I had better opt for a non-reduced relative clause so that I ...
3
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1answer
199 views

Are “Get” or “Grasp” stative or dynamic verbs?

In Merriam–Webster, the definition of understand is as follows: to get the meaning of something / to grasp the meaning of something. Now my questions are regarding a sentence like: I don’t ...
3
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2answers
95 views

Is there a grammatical form that helps you to express that you don't believe the speaker? (reported speech)

Indirect speech: Can you express that you don't believe the original speaker of a sentence (with the help of a tense or a verb form)?
3
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3answers
557 views

tense of “would be” (when used as a synonym for “was”)

In a school paper, my son wrote the sentence, "In 1763, the stalemate would be broken." His teacher told him to avoid the "past progressive tense." The phrase "would be" is clearly not an example of ...
3
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1answer
93 views

Does “The father regretted to tell his children something embarrassing” make sense?

I came across this question in a test: The father regretted _____ his children how he regretted _____ hard when he was young. A. to tell; not to study B. telling; not studying C. to tell; not ...
3
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1answer
58 views

Past Perfect Tense Used Instead of Past Simple in 'The Kite Runner'

I'm currently reading 'The Kite Runner' by Khaled Hosseini, and notice that in some place in the book, i can't really comprehend the use of past perfect tense instead of simple past tense. Consider ...
3
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3answers
129 views

Proper ellipsis [linguistic] for “Yes/No” questions/answers containing “do + like”

Is it grammatically correct to say/write the following Q: Do you like to eat ice cream/apples...? A: No, I don't like [to eat apples]./ Yes, I like [to eat apples]. Is it necessary to include the ...
2
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0answers
28 views

Rock and roll past

According to Wikipedia, Jerry Lee Lewis's successes continued throughout the decade and he embraced his rock and roll past with songs such as a cover of the Big Bopper's "Chantilly Lace" and Mack ...
2
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0answers
22 views

Hear it used this way? - Complement or Modifier

While writing the following sentence I was curious whether the sentence was correct. But after checking COCA, I came to now that similar expressions are in use. The sentence I wrote is: Have you ...
2
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0answers
28 views

Pre-requisite vs prerequisite

Looking up this on English exchange I couldn't seem to find a single source of truth: Instance 1 - "Prerequisite" in search: "Prerequisite for" vs. "prerequisite to" Instance 2 - ...
2
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1answer
37 views

“Kind” or “Kinds”?

I understand the basic singular/plural agreement when using kind/kinds: This kind of person Those kinds of people But what do you do if the subject is not the plural "those" but rather the ...
2
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2answers
90 views

Infinitives used as imperatives?

There is a passage in The Moonstone (by Wilkie Collins, 1874) which is full of infinitive forms of verbs. ("To xxx"). What I find hard to explain is that despite the infinitives, this passage clearly ...
2
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0answers
42 views

Why the determiner “the” is missing?

"The descriptions given by people who claimed to have seen the puma were extraordinarily similar." It is a sentence from the first article of the NEW CONCEPT ENGLISH 3. I was wondering that why the ...
2
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1answer
46 views

How to use word in parentheses

I wrote a sentence: Figure 6(top) shows that....... while figure 6(bottom) shows.... Does this sentence look grammatically clear with using parentheses? Do I have to leave a space after number 6, ...
2
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1answer
33 views

Using Simple past and past progressive

We had a chat while we waited for our flights. Is Simple past also used after While? I saw it in a grammar book, and I'm not sure if it's correct.
2
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1answer
241 views

More of a/an/the something than something

I would like to know more about this expression: More of a/an something than something. As far as I know, it's usually used when we refer to things that are preceded by articles such as a and an. For ...
2
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1answer
68 views

Use of “here” in the middle or at the end of the sentence

I have two sentences, and the location of here bothers me. Could you help me figure out whether it's possible to use both of them or only one sentence is correct? The object here is the chair. The ...
2
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2answers
106 views

Using “in other words” before asking a question

The second sentence in the text below is puzzling me. Do you think the process is complicated enough that users will need screenshots? In other words, could plain text instructions do the job? Does ...
2
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1answer
108 views

Imperative sentence patterns …

Please let me ask you native or very well-trained Eglish speakers if there’s some patterns, rules, or formulas in regards of an imperative sentence’s structure. For example, I was reading this ...
2
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0answers
53 views

What is difference between participle phrases and ellipsis of subject + be in adverb phrases?

When invited, she gladly said yes. In the above sentence, my book says the sentence is formed because ‘she was’ is omitted. And the sentence is the example of ellipsis of the same subject + be in the ...
2
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2answers
529 views

Is “of” needed here? “I have no idea of what to do”

I have no idea of what to do. I have no idea what to do. Q1. Can we use both expressions? Are both grammatical? Q2. Is 'no idea' in apposition with 'what to do'? What is the relationship between them?...
2
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1answer
90 views

I will run an Italian restaurant near the beach in London

1. Someday, I will run an Italian restaurant near the beach in London. There are two prepositional phrases in this sentence. One is 'near the beach'. The other is 'in London'. Is 'near the beach' an ...
2
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1answer
69 views

Noun is a noun (terminology)

Is there any particular term for when we use one noun to describe/define another. Karl is a teacher Pigeons are birds. Basically, the format being “x is y”. Is there a name for the concept,...
2
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1answer
614 views

Is there something wrong with using “said (that)” in this sentence?

Quick context, work as a translator. I had a short blurb I had to translate where I basically rendered it as: "Bob spoke about how Countryland was one of the countries that suffered greatly from ...
2
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0answers
77 views

What are the grammatical rules for phrases like “Rome Victorious”?

Some people seem to use this phrase. The adjective 'Victorious' seems that it is being used as if it is part of the noun. Would this work in other cases? e.g. "Rome Sacrosanct". Is it technically ...
2
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0answers
72 views

What type of word allows raising?

I've come across a comment in “it seems” vs. “it seems that” and I am uncertain as to what type of word allows raising. It's not necessary (though it's almost always possible) for any complement ...
2
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1answer
438 views

finished / unfinished progressive actions

I am new here, so forgive me if I do something improper. I've been wondering what makes it clear if the action was ongoing and completed or ongoing and uncompleted. Short dialogue: X: Oh, you look ...
2
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0answers
165 views

Can a word function as a relative adverb and a relative pronoun simultaneously?

For example in a sentence like "This is the place where he was murdered", is where functioning as both a relative adverb and a relative pronoun? Here where acts as pronoun as it refers back to its ...
2
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3answers
3k views

“I remember the advice he gave to me” Why add preposition to?

While I was reading a book, I stumbled upon a sentence "I remember the advice he gave to me". From my understanding, give can be used in two ways. First. Give + IO + DO. For example, "He gave me an ...
2
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0answers
2k views

Difference between “after” and “since”

I have a question related to the usage of "Since" and "after". Actually I found these three sentences on news articles. And I have seen a large number results both in "news" and "Ngrams". Are all ...
2
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0answers
703 views

“Will” vs “would” in reported speech

Suppose today is 30th November. Today my friend (John) says to me on phone "I will definitely go to the market tomorrow". Now if I want to report his speech just after a few hours on 30th November, "...
2
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0answers
353 views

Rules on noun+noun structures

Although there are plenty of grammar topics that I occasionally struggle with, there is one that causes the most trouble. Lately, I have been writing a lot of technical instructions and manuals, in ...
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0answers
90 views

What does one call the noun a preposition relates to its object?

With minimal research online one can easily find that a prepositional phrase consists of a preposition and an object. Most online and paper resources will describe a preposition as a word that ...
2
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0answers
337 views

Is “the phenomenon that a conductor experiences a force in a magnetic field” grammatically correct?

The full sentence is: [The Motor Effect is:] The phenomenon that a current-carrying conductor experiences a force in an external magnetic field. My Physics teacher says that it sounds clunky. ...
2
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0answers
630 views

How to drop a pronoun? (pronoun-dropping/removing 'I'/omitting the subject)

I wrote resume and got stuck in this place. There are recommendations to write your achievements in the short form (without "I"): "Worked with ... " "Created something ... " "Collaborated with ... "...
2
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0answers
4k views

shall not be more than vs. shall be not more than?

It shall be not more than 1m. It shall not be more than 1m. Which is the correct way to say "it shall be less than or equal to 1m"? Two expressions are mixed in Google, so I want to know what ...
2
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0answers
2k views

Replacing “and” with comma

EB size and structure is known to influence differentiation potential, and the microwell system provides a robust, efficient method of producing EBs of any size or shape. I've seen many sentences in ...
2
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3answers
49k views

Comma before “than” [What better way to celebrate.., than…]

I'd really appreciate some help on this one. Do I use comma in the following sentence? What better way to celebrate 30 years of [name of my local football club], than with a win against [name of ...
2
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1answer
40 views

“make quick work of” — proper usage

I was wondering how to use this properly if I want to connect it to a more descriptive verb: For example: "He made quick work of the thorn." doesn't really describe the specific action, "to remove" ...
2
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1answer
40 views

Future simple or present simple with “when”

-When will you arrive in this city again? - In a month. I was always taught that we don't use the future simple after "with", but I came across with this sentence in my textbooks. So i'm confused why ...
2
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1answer
81 views

Does this sentence need a question mark?: “What was the secret, John was asked.”

I want to know if this sentence needs a question mark to be grammatically correct: "What was the secret, John was asked."
2
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1answer
116 views

Is it correct to express possessive form of the word “past”?

The title a colleague came up with shows a possessive form of the word past - but it sounds off to me. Is this correct and if not, how do you suggest I phrase it instead? Melt the weight by ...