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Questions tagged [grammar]

This tag is for questions about morphology and syntax, the two elements of grammar. DO NOT USE THIS TAG IF YOUR QUESTION IS ABOUT WHETHER SOMETHING SPECIFIC IS GRAMMATICAL. For such cases use the 'grammaticality' tag. Also do not use this for punctuation or spelling (orthography); those are not about grammar, and they have their own tags.

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36 views

Present Participle versus Gerund

I was taught that the Present Continuous is formed using the Gerund, but that you call it the Present Participle. Even though these two forms look exactly alike in English, in other languages they do ...
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24 views

Verb tenses in a sentence

Is this sentence Grammarly correct? The group members discussed their ideas to establish norms. I am not sure if I can use the present tense (establish) after using past tense (discussed).
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65 views

What's happening in this sentence using “far away”?

"David and Emma live far away in the mountains." What grammatical role do the words "far" and "away" have in that sentence? I realize that "far away" must be an adverbial, that can be both a ...
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73 views

Imperative sentence patterns …

Please let me ask you native or very well-trained Eglish speakers if there’s some patterns, rules, or formulas in regards of an imperative sentence’s structure. For example, I was reading this ...
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0answers
47 views

What is difference between participle phrases and ellipsis of subject + be in adverb phrases?

When invited, she gladly said yes. In the above sentence, my book says the sentence is formed because ‘she was’ is omitted. And the sentence is the example of ellipsis of the same subject + be in the ...
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0answers
74 views

What are the grammatical rules for phrases like “Rome Victorious”?

Some people seem to use this phrase. The adjective 'Victorious' seems that it is being used as if it is part of the noun. Would this work in other cases? e.g. "Rome Sacrosanct". Is it technically ...
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0answers
70 views

What type of word allows raising?

I've come across a comment in “it seems” vs. “it seems that” and I am uncertain as to what type of word allows raising. It's not necessary (though it's almost always possible) for any complement ...
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0answers
157 views

Can a word function as a relative adverb and a relative pronoun simultaneously?

For example in a sentence like "This is the place where he was murdered", is where functioning as both a relative adverb and a relative pronoun? Here where acts as pronoun as it refers back to its ...
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0answers
2k views

Difference between “after” and “since”

I have a question related to the usage of "Since" and "after". Actually I found these three sentences on news articles. And I have seen a large number results both in "news" and "Ngrams". Are all ...
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0answers
305 views

Rules on noun+noun structures

Although there are plenty of grammar topics that I occasionally struggle with, there is one that causes the most trouble. Lately, I have been writing a lot of technical instructions and manuals, in ...
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0answers
85 views

What does one call the noun a preposition relates to its object?

With minimal research online one can easily find that a prepositional phrase consists of a preposition and an object. Most online and paper resources will describe a preposition as a word that ...
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0answers
381 views

“If the family wasn't killed, maybe he'd never have left.” Why is past simple “wasn't” used here?

It's another time when I come across this sort of conditional and can't understand why there is a past simple in the "if" clause. Shouldn't there be a past perfect (hadn't been killed)? Here's the ...
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602 views

How to drop a pronoun? (pronoun-dropping/removing 'I'/omitting the subject)

I wrote resume and got stuck in this place. There are recommendations to write your achievements in the short form (without "I"): "Worked with ... " "Created something ... " "Collaborated with ... "...
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0answers
3k views

shall not be more than vs. shall be not more than?

It shall be not more than 1m. It shall not be more than 1m. Which is the correct way to say "it shall be less than or equal to 1m"? Two expressions are mixed in Google, so I want to know what ...
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0answers
2k views

Replacing “and” with comma

EB size and structure is known to influence differentiation potential, and the microwell system provides a robust, efficient method of producing EBs of any size or shape. I've seen many sentences in ...
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16 views

A question about 'Past Perfect'

everyone! I'll appreciate, if anyone could explain me the usage of past perfect in the following sentence, since the past perfect, I assume, is unusually refering to 'later past'. "The frustrated ...
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0answers
15 views

A question about “seems like” (as If)

He seems to be happy. It seems that he is happy. (formal style) It seems like (as if, as though) he is happy. (informal style) 1) Sentence #1 ; I assume that 'to infinitive' functions as subject ...
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22 views

Sale on now, On sale now, Sale now on

I found a phrase "Sale on now" from a website. I think it is to tell customers that some products are currently offered at the lower prices. But what is the correct order of saying this. I personally ...
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0answers
36 views

Is the letter “d” sometimes pronounced like a glottal stop?

Is the letter "d" sometimes pronounced like a glottal stop? For example is the letter "d" in the word "wouldn't" pronounced like a glottal stop?
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29 views

Feel confused about the use of “seem” or “seems” in these two sentences

I saw the first sentence in a book, and I thought it was a mistake. I googled it and realized that many writers had used it on the websites. But then I googled the second sentence and found many ...
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0answers
21 views

“They serve as means of” vs “They serve as a means of”

I made a "mistake": The blueprints serve as means of recreating the design. I meant to write: The blueprints serve as a means of recreating the design. Means is a plural noun, which can be ...
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0answers
21 views

Syntactic Characteristics of Coordination

Is it grammatically correct to say John plays the guitar and Mary, the piano ..... when it comes to the syntactic features of Coordination
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24 views

Interrogatives followed by an infinitive

I know these sentences work: We don't know where to put the sofa. (where we should put the sofa) No one could tell me how to start the engine. (how I should start the engine) The rules didn't ...
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38 views

How to understand WHICH here?

Further,as from 1 January 1958 or the earliest practicable date thereafter, contracting parties shall cease to grant either directly or indirectly any form of subsidy on the export of any product ...
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24 views

What is correct use of definite article “the”?

They hiked the price and demand wasn't decreasing. Or They hiked the price and, the demand wasn't decreasing.
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45 views

Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
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29 views

Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
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32 views

Can I use the “there is” construction for art exhibitions, instead of using the word “hold”?

As a sightseeing suggestion to my out-of-town friend, I want to say there's an exhibition he might be interested in checking out. Option 1 below sounds too formal to me, so I'd like to know if ...
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0answers
47 views

Help me understand the usage of “edition” in “Apple Watch Edition”

I am not sure how to put this, but shouldn't it be < Apple Watch > < _____ Edition >? In my understanding, it is usually product followed by edition, and something to indicate what edition it ...
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39 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct and can be used for Women's Day?

Let women rise and use their strength to contribute to the world. I need to use this sentence for a Women's Day social media design. But there are two doubts: Should it be women or woman? Let women ...
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0answers
101 views

Which is correct: “where she went” or “where did she go”?

My friend asked me about my colleague and I replied him that "I don't know where she went". Then he replied that I must say like "I don't know where did she go". Is there any mistake in the former ...
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0answers
37 views

What is the correct way to say the next sentence?

Spanish is my first language and I just saw a post on Instagram that says "Quality sobriety must include self acceptance" and I want to comment it by saying this: This is the hardest part for me Is ...
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15 views

Is it Compound sentence? What are the two main clauses?

Raj is not only brave but also clever. Is it Compound sentence? What are the two main clauses?
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20 views

Gerund after to be verb

I'm trying to understand if this sentence is right, if so, why. The problem is trying to learn without practicing I've been looking for the answer to this question in sites and grammars. I didn't ...
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0answers
38 views

Only if __ “can you” __

"You can __ only if __." "Only if __ can you __." Why does the word order change to "can you" in the latter sentence?
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34 views

Is 'coin' a non-count noun?

I noticed that in banks' publications, they speak of notes and coin (rather than coins). So, is coin a non-count noun, like fruit and fish? We'd say, "Do you have any fruit/fish in your fridge?" (...
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0answers
53 views

Can a prepositional phrase modify a noun when there is a verb between the noun and the prepositional phrase?

For example, Forecasts have emerged of heavy rain. A structurally sound argument was presented of the characteristics and implications of economic recessions. Is the prepositional phrase ...
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193 views

British vs. USA grammar: Wasn't or Weren't usage

From a British speaker, "I hope you wasn't too late." In the USA we would say "weren't". Was this poor grammar, or is this acceptable in the UK? I immediately thought it wrong; however, I don't want ...
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44 views

“Left behind after class?” Is this sentence correct?

Is the following sentence correct? "I left my book behind after class." What I want to say is that my character left their book behind after class, so they went back to get it. I know I could say "...
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17 views

which is a right way to write list Item

Below are the example to write a List, which is a right way to write list Item Example 1 : 4).Upload with File Restrictions Example 2 : 4) Upload with File Restrictions
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46 views

“fall prey to” or “fall a prey to”

Thanks everyone for checking this question. I was reading Great Books of the Western World, and there is a phrase "fall a prey to" and since I didn't know about it so I went to Collins Dict and ...
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0answers
22 views

Help identifying clasuses, sentence structure

I'm a first time poster, so please let me know if I am posting in the wrong place! I am trying to break down the sentence structure of this sentence. Specifically, how commas are used in the following ...
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287 views

“Welcome to” or “Welcome in”?

Could anyone help me and explain when we should use "welcome to" or "welcome in"? I know that both exist but I would like to get sentences as examples in order to clearly understand the difference. ...
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35 views

Adjective and conjunction which has higher priority?

I have a question about priority. For example: "elder brother and sister" means: "elder (brother and sister)" or "(elder brother) and sister"? Another example: "old men and women" means: "old (...
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27 views

From a systemic functional approach, what would a transitivity analysis of 'be that as it may' show?

I found this beautifully organized text for my students to analyze in terms of thematic progression. I'll also ask them to provide a transitivity analysis of some of its clauses, but there's that ...
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89 views

Comma Before Things Like “I thought”?

Would it be okay to write or say a sentence like this, and would it be grammatically correct? Examples: He went to Aruba, I thought. You're wrong, I think. These look like deer tracks, I would say. ...
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0answers
30 views

negative interrogative forms in present simple and continuous

my question is about forming negative questions in present simple and continuous, I have got some confusion here: as you know, there is a special case when it comes to tag questions with subject I ...
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0answers
86 views

“fresh and relaxed”

I have to identify the syntax used in these two sentences and explain. A. After a short vacation in Japan, Mr Chang appeared in my office, fresh and relaxed. B. After a short vacation in Japan, Mr ...
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53 views

'Downwards' versus 'Downward'

I'm new here (this is my first question :D) I was memorizing a specific sentence in a passage about photography, and I accidently made a mistake of memorizing 'downward' as 'downwards'. I'm a non-...
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79 views

participle adjective or verb

In the sentence "I like steamed chicken." Steamed is an adjective. However if I say "The chicken is steamed." Steamed becomes a verb in the passive construct. And in this sentence, "The chicken has ...