Questions tagged [gerunds]

A ɢᴇʀᴜɴᴅ is a type of verb, in particular an -ɪɴɢ verb that heads a non-finite verb clause when that entire clause is being used as a noun phrase, typically as the subject or object of a finite clause. Not to be confused with -ɪɴɢ words that are no longer verbs, like deverbal nouns or participial adjectives, a gerund accepts only verb modifiers and arguments, not those of nouns or adjectives.

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54 views

Is this Stack Overflow question title correct? [closed]

I asked question on Stack Overflow with the following title: Is reading or writing directly from boost::asio::ssl::stream::next_layer() bypasses SSL decryption and encryption? A friend of mine ...
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280 views

What is wrong with this sentence that start with a gerund?

In my last writing exam I wrote: ... when I decided to address the matter to the headwaiter, he rudely recommended delivering any sort of complaint by writing. Offering no prompt solution to the ...
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Making “Get” Have No Implied Time Period (AKA No Tense)

I want to make get have no implied time period. Or if that's not possible, to negate its implied time period (probably with always) I want to make an affirmation of mine say "I always work to [the ...
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Is the sentence “Queueing is so thoughtful of you.” grammatically correct?

In the following two blog posts ("Illiteracy in Singapore - the Land Transport Authority" and "LTA's illiterate poster") the author accused the poster depicted below of being evidence of illiteracy in ...
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“can't do anything except eating” vs. “can't do anything except eat”

My dog is so lazy. It can't do anything except eating food. My dog is so lazy. It can't do anything except eat food. Which one is right? We asked this question in two different forums but we ...
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Structure with to infinitive or gerund or past participle

I read a vocabulary book . There is a sentence which makes me confused. " The government had passed a bill outlawing smoking while driving" . I wonder if why the author use "outlawing" here but not ...
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Which is grammatically correct? (“then passing” vs “then we pass”) [closed]

We find this processes’ PID by running the command “ps ax," then we pass this PID to Cycript to allow it to inject itself into the application. or We find this processes’ PID by running the ...
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281 views

Using the Possessive with Gerunds: appreciate their thinking or appreciate them thinking? [duplicate]

In formal writing, which sentence would be a better choice to imply "I appreciated that they had thought of me"? I appreciated their thinking of me. I appreciated them thinking of me. Is there a ...
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Is the word 'getting' used as a gerund in 'getting stronger every day'?

In the phrase, "Getting Stronger Every Day," I know that "getting" is a participle, but in this phrase, is it a gerund? If not, why?
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The elevator going up/down [duplicate]

I was very surprised when I first heard "this elevator going up". But then I heard it in a bunch of other places, so it is not a mistake. So, why is it not "the elevator is going up/down"? Thank you! ...
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Subject-control verbs

I have been studying Raising and Controlling, but it seems quite hard to understand its function and uses. I would like any of you to analyze this explanation and tell me whether I got it correct or ...
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218 views

When is the object of a verb the subject of the gerund in structure “subject + verb + object + preposition + gerund”?

1) This reminds me of climbing Ben Nevis years ago. 2) I told you about losing my credit card, didn't I? I'm quite sure that the person who climbed Ben Nevis is "I" not "This" in 1). But, I'm ...
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How to identify where to use gerund after 'to'?

How to identify where to use gerund after 'to'? In some cases like "Look forward to" / "Looking forward to", we have to use gerund, which makes the sentence as, "Looking forward to meeting you". ...
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Descriptive words and gerunds or present participles

Gerunds and present participles happen to look exactly the same in English, the first acting as a noun and the second as either an adjective, a verb denoting continuous action, or introducing a ...
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615 views

Gerund or infinitive in : “… but to do that” vs. “… but doing that”

What is correct form in between these sentences: He had no choice but doing that or He had no choice but to do that. When I googled "but doing that" I found 388,000 results, whereas "but to ...
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Gerund with you or your [duplicate]

What is the correct form: " I can't bear the thought of YOUR going out" or "I can't bear the thought of YOU going out".
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Are expressions “set (something) to ringing” and “set (something) to watering” using invalid grammar?

I chanced upon these sentences, and I wondered about their grammar because they don’t sound right to me: The wind sets all the bells to ringing. (Should this be “sets all bells ringing”?) The aroma ...
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“before” + past gerund [closed]

Our English teacher was telling us about past gerund and provided us with some examples. One of them was: I was really drunk before having crashed my car. I was confused by "having" as I thought ...
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973 views

to do or for doing [closed]

Which sentence is correct grammatically? I am ready for watching TV I am ready to watch TV In general, when we can replace to do with for doing in English? It seems that both of them have an ...
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Do “without being disturbed” and “as being undisturbed” have similar meanings?

In one school's mid-term English exam, there was a question that had three blanks to fill in. When you sleep, it is important to get a good night's sleep _______ _______ _________ by 'sleep ...
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How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

ᴛʟᴅʀ: Is it ever possible for a sentence to have a word in it that is simultaneously more than one single part of speech in that sentence under the same parse and meaning? (For example, a few ...
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Which expression is correct? “I've already started working on it” or “I've already started to work on it” [duplicate]

today i attended an interview. The employer told me that I should know some skills about the job. Today I am going to start to work on those skills. Now, I am writing a "thank you for the interview" ...
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166 views

Which one is correct: await you going in hell or await you to go in hell?

Please help me to understand this: I will await you making that folder public. I will wait for you coming out of your house. Or, I will await you to make that folder public. I will wait for you to ...
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1answer
145 views

Gerund vs. infinitive: are both forms acceptable for the following examples?

It is a lesser evil to have x than to have y. Having x is a lesser evil than having y. Which of them are incorrect?
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Where to put the pronoun in a sentence when using the gerund verb form?

Which sentence is correct? it seems we are all living in a weird land or it seems we all are living in a weird land ?
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having been or being [duplicate]

Which of these sentences is correct? You mentioned having been in a hospital last year. You mentioned being in a hospital last year.
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Word meaning 'The seeking out and assimilation of information.' [closed]

Such as the hungering after of knowledge, but in a singular word. My thanks.
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Is “What I'm doing is” followed by an infinitive or gerund form? [closed]

Title says everything. American English please (but if it's different in British English, please point that out as well)
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241 views

Is this construction correct? “Today is [(pro)noun] [gerund]”

"Today is [(pro)noun] [gerund]" Context: Some time ago, my friend and I were messaging each other and then I used this construction. He immediately said that my sentence should've been "Today [(pro)...
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514 views

Writing style: gerunds or nouns [closed]

I'm describing my job responsabilities and would like to note that in terms of my position I was in charge of research and choosing technologies. Do I assume correctly that in the following case it's ...
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259 views

Is it correct to say “Practice these words.”?

I usually say "Practice pronouncing these words correctly." Is it correct to say "Practice these words."?
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2answers
272 views

Imperfect or past progressive

''I was assisting at the general happiness.'' ''I assisted at the general happiness.''* Is there any difference between these two sentences? Are both grammatical? From what I know, the imperfect ...
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1answer
103 views

The “continuous tense”. How can I use this tense with “better than anyone could”? [closed]

I'm not sure what tense this is, but it's for a presentation. It's the best I could come up with while translating it into English. Meeting deadlines. Working with bla... bla... Building ...
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2answers
186 views

Is << noun + “for” + gerund >> a valid noun phrase construction to indicate purpose of the head noun in a normal sentence (i.e. not in a title)?

The following two sentences are patentese (written in language used in a patent): A display apparatus includes a display device for displaying an image. The display apparatus may include an ...
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When using a verb that has a noun form with a gerund, do you use the gerund or the noun?

This is the sentence in question: The last time he slept in a room by himself must have been that melancholy week between Stave’s passing and my arriving. Now, in the above sentence, the ...
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350 views

Help me parse this sentence

I and my friend have started examining sentences to recognise parts of speech in them. In our discourse, we could not agree on the point that "naming" in the below sentence is a verb. The White ...
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Probability/Likelihood/Chance to infinitive vs. of gerund [closed]

In the following sentences expressing the likelihood of an action expressed with a verb, which versions are the correct ones? the probability of finding him there vs. the probability to find him ...
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Is “running” a gerund or a participial adjective?

An enlightening experiment Google Books yields only 39 results, and instead asks me if I wanted to say “an enlightening experience”, and eagerly shows an impressive 10,000 results when I click on ...
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does the phrase “After failing the vocab test, they drowned themselves in jolly ranchers” have a gerund? [closed]

Question "After failing the vocab test, they drowned themselves in jolly ranchers" Part 1 of Question is "after failing the vocab test" a gerund phrase? If it is why? how do you identify whether ...
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all he did was “ask” or “asking”?

"asking" - In this case this kind of language element is called gerund, right? In high school my teacher firmly told us two verbs can never be together (25 years later I can still remember her angry ...
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118 views

Video conference and video conferencing, is there any difference between them?

My English student asked me: "Video-conference and video-conferencing, is there any difference between them?" Is Video-conference a countable noun and Video-conferencing an uncountable noun? Is Video-...
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National anthem — “playing” and “being played” [closed]

Here are two sentences: India follows the custom of playing national anthem at the movies. [simple gerund- playing] It's ‘India’ in which national anthem is played at the movies and India follows ...
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hyphen in noun-gerund compounds

I am lost with the rule that noun-gerund compounds do not get a hyphen if used as nouns. Example: He liked novel reading. Is it correct not to use a hyphen between novel and reading here? I ...
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Grammatical correctness of the following sentence

I came across this sentence while preparing for the IELTS writing exam: There are a number of causes of people not doing physical activities. That causes of should be followed by a noun or gerund. ...
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965 views

Gerund vs Present Participle: “I was thinking about eating the apple.”

A quick question that has popped up from talking with my German pen-pal. In the sentence: I was thinking about eating the apple. Is eating there a gerund or a present participle? If it is just: ...
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1answer
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What’s the difference between “the using of this machine” and “using my neighbour’s wifi”?

Please consider these two different sentences*: I am aware of the using of this machine. I am accused of using my neighbour’s wifi. Why do we use the article the before the using in the first ...
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Grammaticality of “who fell to earth, shattering the land”

While watching Youtube videos, I recently came across this sentence Their quarrel turned to rage and their violent struggle darkened the skies, until the Dragon of the South Wind struck ...
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Verbs vs. gerunds vs. something else?

Given the following sentences: I have even started using them in normal writing. People can understand your writing better. Are using and writing gerunds, verbs, or some other part of ...
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162 views

In “losing weight” and “gaining weight,” are “losing” and “gaining” gerunds or adjectives?

I saw countless youtube videos and grammar books but -ing is too hard. losing weight gaining weight are "losing" and "gaining" gerund or adjective?
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771 views

Are these parts of speech correct? [closed]

Considering the following sentences: Don't listen to those other people. You should always use prefixes with your table names. I have even started using them in normal writing. See how ...