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-1
votes
2answers
39 views

I couldn't decide which one to use, and where to use: simple tense vs. perfect tense

The two questions in my grammar book: 1)"Many people claim ------ sundaes and many towns around the world pretend ---- birthplaces of ice creams. A) to have invented / to be B) to ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Are two (or more) to-infinitives treated as singular?

A friend said to me that two (or more) to-infinitives are treated as singular (whereas gerunds can be treated as plural depending on the situation). Is it true? Or, in this example sentence, which ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Gerund or infinitive and WHY

WHY is this sentence incorrect? "All that they can do is preparing as much as they can." I know it should be "All they can do is (to) prepare as much as they can." But, for the life of me I can't ...
-1
votes
1answer
52 views

How to use 'fly'?

There is your sky Break your cage You meant for fly Not for staying in a range "You meant for flying" Or "You meant for fly" Which one is correct?
0
votes
3answers
46 views

Is is possible to say “Admit to something being something else”?

I was wondering if anyone could help me figure out whether the sentence below is grammatically correct or not. (is it okay to say admit to something being something else?) "The Prime Minister admits ...
0
votes
0answers
65 views

“To travel is to live” is this sentence correct?

I got a bottle as a present and it is written "To travel is to live" I supposed that should be written something different but I don't know how to say this in English, somebody tried to say that when ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

What is the difference between “It's sad to see you leave.” and “It's sad seeing you leaving.”?

"It's sad to see you leave." "It's sad seeing you leaving." I know the first one has a infinitive, and the second one a gerund. But I'm not sure about the difference of the meaning. or these two ...
9
votes
2answers
667 views

Gerund? Infinitive? Why, when we talk about jobs, do we say “I have a job taking people on tours” instead of “I have a job to take people on tours”?

I'm teaching English in China. I wanted middle school or younger, but I was put with some great high school kids and they sometimes ask me questions that I don't know how to answer yet. I'm a native ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Making “Get” Have No Implied Time Period (AKA No Tense)

I want to make get have no implied time period. Or if that's not possible, to negate its implied time period (probably with always) I want to make an affirmation of mine say "I always work to [the ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“can't do anything except eating” vs. “can't do anything except eat”

My dog is so lazy. It can't do anything except eating food. My dog is so lazy. It can't do anything except eat food. Which one is right? We asked this question in two different forums but we ...
7
votes
1answer
677 views

Subject-control verbs

I have been studying Raising and Controlling, but it seems quite hard to understand its function and uses. I would like any of you to analyze this explanation and tell me whether I got it correct or ...
2
votes
1answer
614 views

Gerund or infinitive in : “… but to do that” vs. “… but doing that”

What is correct form in between these sentences: He had no choice but doing that or He had no choice but to do that. When I googled "but doing that" I found 388,000 results, whereas "but to ...
0
votes
2answers
40k views

Which expression is correct? “I've already started working on it” or “I've already started to work on it” [duplicate]

today i attended an interview. The employer told me that I should know some skills about the job. Today I am going to start to work on those skills. Now, I am writing a "thank you for the interview" ...
0
votes
1answer
145 views

Gerund vs. infinitive: are both forms acceptable for the following examples?

It is a lesser evil to have x than to have y. Having x is a lesser evil than having y. Which of them are incorrect?
1
vote
1answer
697 views

Is “What I'm doing is” followed by an infinitive or gerund form? [closed]

Title says everything. American English please (but if it's different in British English, please point that out as well)
1
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0answers
1k views

Probability/Likelihood/Chance to infinitive vs. of gerund [closed]

In the following sentences expressing the likelihood of an action expressed with a verb, which versions are the correct ones? the probability of finding him there vs. the probability to find him ...
2
votes
1answer
284 views

Position of verbals

In the first sentence, We move the infinitive to the end of the sentence and place a prepatory object after verb. But when we use gerund, we keep it after verb as in second sentence . I was wondering ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

When to use a gerund or an infinitive after “is”?

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive? states a 90% rule, but I'm more interested in the remaining 10%. This British Council page states Sorry, there isn’t a rule. You have to ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Infinitive instead of gerund, specifically after 'require' [duplicate]

I use Grammarly Chrome extension to validate my texts in English. And with some sentences I keep seeing the error message "Infinitive instead of gerund". I'm not sure if this is an appropriate error ...
0
votes
1answer
298 views

Difference between using a gerund and using to + verb root

As an objective (or subjective). "Being a teacher" vs "to be a teacher". What is the difference between gerund and 'to' + verb root ? My dream is being a teacher. My dream is to be a teacher.
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Meeting you and to meet you? [closed]

What is the difference between these two versions: I look forward to meeting you. I look forward to meet you. They seem very similar and exchangeable to me as I am a non-native speaker.
1
vote
1answer
597 views

Usage of “to spend” instead of gerund [duplicate]

In the following sentence, although a gerund would be preferred, is the usage of "to spend" correct? "Do you really think it's worth it to spend hundreds of pounds on video games?"
3
votes
4answers
7k views

Why 'doing' after 'look forward to'?

Normally, 'I want to do something', 'nice to meet you', that the verb always be its normal status. But why 'look forward to doing'?For example, I am looking forward to seeing all of the great ideas ...
1
vote
1answer
17k views

“dedicated to helping people ” or “dedicated to help people” [closed]

I have this sentence: I'm a volunteer in an organization that is dedicated to helping people find answers about life in the Bible. or it should be I'm a volunteer in an organization that is ...
0
votes
1answer
29k views

When to use “love to do something” and “love doing something”? [duplicate]

OK, I searched similar questions on https://english.stackexchange.com/ and it seems that people say that to love to do something=prefer to do something to love doing something=enjoy doing ...
2
votes
2answers
378 views

Infinitive or gerund [duplicate]

So, I've got this phrase: ''Far from fleeing monotony, animals crave it, and what they most dread is to see it end.'' Can someone explain me why it is written ''to see it end'' rather than ''to see ...
0
votes
1answer
911 views

What to use?: Infinitive, bare infinitive or gerund as a complement after an expression [duplicate]

I came across some sentences and I was wondering which word is correct: 'train,' 'to train' or 'training'? What we should do is train our workers to become more efficient. All I we do is train our ...
2
votes
1answer
887 views

The “to~” infinitive always implies the future, except for preference Like and Love

A fellow teacher said to me that the to~ infinitive always implies the future..."to eat", "to swim" etc. I disagreed and said that I thought it was abstract and had no tense in of itself. He pointed ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Using to + gerund and to + invinitive [duplicate]

"I go to school" Because 'to' is a preposition then is it correct to write "I go to watching the movie"? If not, please explain why. Thank you.
0
votes
1answer
396 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
4
votes
1answer
537 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. [...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Clauses of purpose: “for + -ing” or "to-infinitive [duplicate]

In the following sentence, how should the clause of purpose be introduced? In addition to normal maintenance, there are additional costs associated with interventions that may be required to ...
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Why must the infinitive be used after “I am qualified to”?

I am not able to understand why the infinitive must be used after "I am qualified to". For example I am qualified to teach. Does not to play the role of preposition in this sentence? If the ...
-1
votes
2answers
6k views

going + ing vs going + infinitive, when use which?

In the middle of a conversation I should use which of the follow sentences: Tomorrow, I'm going climbing. or Tomorrow, I'm going to climb. I did a deep search and I found these similar answers,...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
2
votes
1answer
175 views

A question about “to becoming” [duplicate]

Would this sentence be correct? Being scared is the first step to becoming free. The more I look at it, the less clear it becomes.
-1
votes
1answer
897 views

Compound verbs with infinitive and gerund [closed]

Which statements are grammatically correct and which meaning do they convey, This concept helps understand the problem. This concept helps to understand the problem. This concept helps understanding ...
9
votes
6answers
29k views

Is there a difference between “way of doing something” and “way to do something”?

Is there a difference between "way of doing something" and "way to do something"? It is on purpose that I did not write "a way of doing something" or "the way of doing something" and "a way to do ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Difference between “is to do” and “is doing” [duplicate]

I saw below sentence: Her job is to clean the hall. So can I also say like: Her job is cleaning the hall. It's present participle or gerund? What's the different meaning between these two ...
1
vote
1answer
762 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.? [closed]

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Provide to somebody to do/doing or Provide for somebody to do/doing?

I'm writing a letter to my teacher to thank her for letting me put on a party, but I'm confused by these: I would like to thank somebody for your support, guidance and encouragement, and for the ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
1
vote
1answer
7k views

“Recommend to have” vs. “recommend having” [duplicate]

I am writing my bachelor dissertation and several times Microsoft Word has corrected me from "to have" to "having". One of the sentences, for instance, goes like this: The author recommends to ...
-1
votes
1answer
11k views

“Needs to be repaired” vs. “needs repairing” [duplicate]

Is there any difference in meaning between the following two sentences? My car needs to be repaired. My car needs reparing.
0
votes
1answer
1k views

verbs not followed by that clauses

Where can I find a list of verbs like 'to want', which must be followed by an infinitive (other verbs by a gerund), but cannot be followed by a that-clause? I got from your website that there are ...
-1
votes
1answer
206 views

To repair bicycle is his job. Vs. Repairing bicycle is his job

My question is what the differences are between the two sentences. In what situation do you use infinitive as a subject? And when do you use gerund as a subjective? Thanks a lot!
0
votes
1answer
8k views

“Needs repairing” vs. “needs to be repaired” [duplicate]

Do the following two sentences mean the same thing? If so, which is more commonly used? My car needs repairing. My car needs to be repaired.
1
vote
2answers
5k views

“… need XXX-ing” vs. “… need to be XXX-ed” [duplicate]

What is the difference between these two expressions? Your hair needs brushing. Your hair needs to be brushed.
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Looking to + infinitive” vs “Looking to + gerund” [closed]

Which is the correct expression, looking to build or looking to building? Whether you are looking to build. . . . or Whether you are looking to building. . . .
2
votes
1answer
10k views

“To see” vs “seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is the ...