Questions tagged [gerund-vs-infinitive]

Questions about the differences between "gerunds", formed with *-ing*, and infinitives, formed with *to*.

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5
votes
4answers
13k views

Why “like doing something” or “like to do something” but only “dislike doing something”?

At a further education course for teachers, in Switzerland, (given by two native speakers of English), someone came up with the question of whether you could say "dislike doing something" and "dislike ...
0
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1answer
1k views

How many ways we can say “I didn't spot your ping”? [closed]

One of my colleagues pinged me in chat, but I didn't notice because since I was on a call. Now I want to ping him back that I missed to see his ping and to apologize. I am not sure I missed to see ...
6
votes
2answers
97k views

What are the differences between “seems not” and “doesn't seem”?

Are the following sentences correct? He seems not to want to help us and He seems want to help us. Is it correct if I use "seem" in a negative sentence? Which role does "seem" play? Is ...
0
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2answers
13k views

Is “please be reminding” valid usage?

I received mail from my colleague. He wrote, Please be reminding that... I am confused about this. I think it should be more passive, like this, Please be reminded that... Which is correct?
4
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2answers
1k views

For to ask if this title is grammatical

Being in a country where Spanish is spoken natively, when folks speak English, I often hear them using phrases of the form "for [infinitive]" (e.g., "for to ask"). It strikes me – somewhat ...
0
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1answer
6k views

What is the difference between the infinitive and present participle? [duplicate]

I already know the difference between "stop doing something" and "stop to do something". I really don't know what is the difference between "like doing something" and "like to do something". And is ...
0
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1answer
1k views

“These findings are critical [to inform/for informing] future research” [duplicate]

In this sentence, would you use "to inform" or "for informing"? These findings are critical ______ future research Likewise, would you use "to understand" or "for understanding" in the following? ...
4
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2answers
18k views

I saw her dance/dancing? I saw a flash of lightning strike/striking? I caught her steal/stealing? [duplicate]

Meta: I found a very similar post asking the difference between "I saw him cross" and "I saw him crossing". I have three additional questions on sentences of this form. In the post I am referring to, ...
2
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2answers
31k views

“My interest in becoming” vs. “my interest to become”

I was writing a letter of application for a university. I wanted to start my letter by writing: I am writing this letter to express my interest in becoming part... and then I got confused. I am ...
0
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1answer
385 views

“To hear” or “hearing” [duplicate]

Nothing is so happy as to hear from your family. Nothing is so happy as hearing from your family. Which is more natural for native speakers?
0
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1answer
1k views

“Facility for speaking” vs. “facility to speak”

Which one would you use: I lost my facility to speak. I lost my facility for speaking. Or does either work?
6
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1answer
100k views

Looking forward to “ see” or “seeing”?

Which of the 2 sentences is correct? Sam is looking forward to see the Rocky mountains. Sam is looking forward to seeing the Rocky mountains.
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2answers
4k views

To see them play/playing [duplicate]

Excuse my limited acquaintance on English usage; which sentence is grammatically correct, and if any, which meaning does each convey? I saw them play chess. I saw then playing chess.
0
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1answer
2k views

Is there any difference between “endure + gerund” and “endure + infinitive”?

Many if not all sources state that to endure is followed by a gerund. In OALD, however, there's an example for both: endure doing something He can't endure being defeated. endure to do something ...
-1
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4answers
8k views

“Talking to someone is nice.” or “It is nice to talk to someone.” but “It was nice, talking to you.” Why?

General statement: a. Talking to someone is nice. (verb as subject in front position = gerund) or b. It is nice to talk to someone. (verb as subject after dummy subject 'it' = full infinitive) ...
6
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1answer
19k views

try + ing vs. try to + infinitive [duplicate]

Which sentence is correct: Why don't you try to give up candy if you want to lose some weight? Why don't you try giving up candy if you want to lose some weight?
2
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2answers
1k views

Is “acknowledge(accept status) sb + to + infinitive” valid?

When to acknowledge is used in the sense of to admit the gerund is used. I acknowledge having made a mistake. However, I was wondering what is the appropriate form in the sense of to accept status....
1
vote
1answer
5k views

sorry that I did something, sorry for doing something, or sorry to have done something?

Should it be: 1) "I am sorry (that) I did this to you." 2) "I am sorry for doing this to you." 3) "I am sorry to have done this to you." From what I have learnt about 'sorry', I would exclude 3) '...
2
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2answers
21k views

“fail to do” or “failure in doing”, which is better in this case?

I went to live in the small village to seek a simple life after my failure in finding a decent job in the metropolis. I went to live in the small village to seek a simple life after I fail to find ...
1
vote
1answer
940 views

something is capable of to be p.p. or being p.p.? [closed]

Manual: small, helpful book capable of being carried in the hand. What is the difference between to be carried and being carried in this sentence?
1
vote
1answer
846 views

What are the differences between the following sentences containing “surprised”?

I have written four similar sentences using surprised: I was deeply surprised at the news. I was deeply surprised at learning the news. I was deeply surprised at being told the news. I was ...
1
vote
1answer
9k views

“Recommend to have” vs. “recommend having” [duplicate]

I am writing my bachelor dissertation and several times Microsoft Word has corrected me from "to have" to "having". One of the sentences, for instance, goes like this: The author recommends to ...
12
votes
4answers
223k views

“Suggest to go” vs. “suggest going”

I took an English assessment test online and this was my answer: Someone suggested to go for a walk. My answer was wrong and this was the correct sentence: Someone suggested going for a walk. ...
1
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4answers
4k views

Using apostrophe s before gerunds

I understanding that the following sentence is reasonably good for expressing the given idea. (1) This method is likely to be biased since this requires participants to bring their own laptops. ...
7
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3answers
64k views

“Stop working” vs “stopped to work”

I want to know, is there any difference between "stop + v.(ing)" and "stopped to + v.". These are example sentences. I stop working for a month. vs I stopped to work for a month. I stop watching ...
17
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2answers
5k views

“Try to save” or “try saving”

Are both try to save the file and try saving the file grammatically correct? If so, is there any difference in meaning?
0
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2answers
2k views

“How easy is it to *verb*…” vs. “How easy is *verb*…” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one know when to use a gerund or a infinitive? What is the difference in connotation between How easy is it to "some verb here" and How easy is "some verb here"...
19
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4answers
228k views

“Started to work” vs “Started working”

What is the difference between the following: Things started to work again. Things started working again.
7
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4answers
2k views

Catenatives followed by infinitives and gerunds

What is the difference in meaning when the catenative verb “like” is followed by an infinitive, or by a gerund? For example: Do you like ski jumping? vs. Do you like to ski jump? Also, what ...
16
votes
4answers
104k views

“I like to do (be) something” vs “I like doing (being) something”

This is what I read in an answer to a previous question: Verbs Followed by Either Gerund or Infinitive Sometimes the meaning changes according to the verb used. <…> (dis)like &...
7
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1answer
25k views

“I saw him crossing” vs. “I saw him cross” [duplicate]

I saw him crossing the road. I saw him cross the road. Which one is correct and why?
20
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7answers
10k views

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive?

As a native speaker of English, the gerund version of this sentence sounds better: infinitive: When used together in chains, extension methods are an unprecedented tool to produce extremely ...
58
votes
4answers
51k views

When should a verb be followed by a gerund instead of an infinitive?

Some verbs are followed by ing, e.g. I enjoy swimming. We can't say I enjoy to swim. Likewise, some verbs are followed by to, e.g. I decided to make a plan. Which particular verbs are followed by ...

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