Questions tagged [gerund-vs-infinitive]

Questions about the differences between "gerunds", formed with *-ing*, and infinitives, formed with *to*.

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3
votes
3answers
19k views

When to use the gerund form of a verb after “to”? [duplicate]

I would like to understand when to use the gerund form of a verb after "to." I had in my mind that every verb used after "to" was in its infinitive form, like for example: It is hard to play the ...
0
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1answer
567 views

Doing A is preferable to doing B. = Doing A rather than doing (?) / do (?) B is advisable

In that situation I would rather do A than (I would) (do) B. If the verb 'do' appears after 'rather' it has to be in the bare infinitive, not in the gerund. How about that other way of expressing ...
0
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1answer
204 views

Gerund after “ways to”

I'm writing a paper with a colleague and we are unsure if the grammar in our title is correct. I'd like to go with this variant. Multiple Ways to Measuring Alertness My colleague asks if we should ...
-1
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1answer
2k views

Difference between “start” and “begin” [duplicate]

What's the difference between start and begin? Are the following examples equally grammatical? Do sentences 1 and 2 mean the same? Do they mean the same as sentences 3 and 4? We started to know ...
3
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2answers
6k views

“He had me do this” vs “He had me doing this” vs “He had my doing this”

I know this example sounds awkward, but it’s obviously grammatically incorrect to say "me being here" in sentences like this one: He said me being here was wonderful. That instance of me being ...
1
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2answers
2k views

'd hate to be vs. 'd hate being [closed]

Which of the following two structures is grammatically correct? Why? I'd hate to be questioned by the FBI. I'd hate being questioned by the FBI.
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2answers
2k views

the reason for me + (gerund) / (infinitve)

The reason to go abroad is to study. The reason for me going abroad is to study. These two examples sound correct to me.it popped into my mind that if the following expression would be correct. ...
2
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1answer
305 views

Use of gerund vs bare-infinitive: overfilling vs overfill [duplicate]

How do I explain using "overfilling" instead of "overfill" in the following sentence? We needed to announce the party just a few days from the date to avoid overfill the salon.
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2answers
155 views

Infinitive or gerund when using a noun

I am quite confused about the usage over infinitive verbs and gerunds when talking about nouns. For example: A car for transporting people. and, A car to transport people. both have the ...
0
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2answers
2k views

“Forget” followed by a gerund [closed]

Since "forget" followed by a gerund refers to the past, which one of the following sentences is correct? " I forgot to lock the door." "I forget locking the door." "I forget having locked ...
-1
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2answers
521 views

Use of Infinitive vs. Gerund [closed]

I framed two sentences, one using infinitive and another using gerund. Which of the two sounds more correct? Although the app will continue to occupy the storage space, it will, at least, not run ...
-1
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2answers
336 views

The way the past participle is used in these sentences

First, this is the meaning I am trying to put in writing: She could not tolerate the sight of them as they were being put to death. And I want the progressive aspect to be clear. Which of ...
0
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1answer
189 views

When should we use -ing or infinitive verbs?

I am in doubt about what is the correct form of the verbs remember and understand in the options to the first question below: Which is more difficult in learning a second language? Remembering ...
0
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0answers
11k views

Whether to use gerund or infinitive with word 'hesitate'?

Firstly, i am giving some sentences from some books and links: She hesitates singing in the company of her friends. (from my local book) In order to oblige others or amuse herself, she never ...
0
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1answer
2k views

“To run” vs. “for running of”

I read this sentence in a book: Petrol is needed for running of a car. I wonder if I could say "Petrol is needed to run a car." Is the second sentence grammatically correct? If yes, then what is ...
2
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0answers
34 views

“Listen to me play the flute” vs “listen to me playing the flute” [duplicate]

I see this expression "He listens to me play the flute". Is it correct ? And what about ""He listens to me playing the flute". What is the current form of this expression. I didn't find the answer ...
1
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4answers
10k views

I want (object) (infinitive) or (gerund)?

I want people to enjoy the show. or I want people enjoying the show. Is it possible to use both? I know it's a duplicate but the answers were not clear in the other posts.
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0answers
63 views

Want + Present Participle or Infinitive? [duplicate]

I want people to enjoy the show. or I want people enjoying the show. Is it possible to use both?
0
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1answer
49k views

When to use “love to do something” and “love doing something”? [duplicate]

OK, I searched similar questions on https://english.stackexchange.com/ and it seems that people say that to love to do something=prefer to do something to love doing something=enjoy doing ...
14
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1answer
134k views

“It is worth mentioning” versus “it is worth to mention”

What’s the right way to use the phrase it is worth? Which of the following two approaches is right, and how they are different? It is worth mentioning that [. . .] It is worth to mention that [. . .]
1
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1answer
656 views

TOEFL gerund vs infinitive question [closed]

While doing my TOEFL prep I encountered the following statement where I am asked to find which of the bold words is being used wrongly in the sentence: If one has a special medical condition such ...
0
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4answers
2k views

To + -ING form: e.g. “to getting”? [duplicate]

I look forward to getting first-hand insights and behind-the-scene perspectives from XXX’s professors who are thought leaders and experts in their fields. Should I replace to getting with to get ? ...
0
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1answer
398 views

Infinitive or gerund in the beginning of a sentence

Is the following sentence correct? Living in US for 10 months helped me to grow culturally, academically, professionally and personally.
2
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2answers
415 views

Infinitive or gerund [duplicate]

So, I've got this phrase: ''Far from fleeing monotony, animals crave it, and what they most dread is to see it end.'' Can someone explain me why it is written ''to see it end'' rather than ''to see ...
0
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1answer
1k views

What to use?: Infinitive, bare infinitive or gerund as a complement after an expression [duplicate]

I came across some sentences and I was wondering which word is correct: 'train,' 'to train' or 'training'? What we should do is train our workers to become more efficient. All I we do is train our ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Using “use” with “to” and “for” when expressing purpose

I recently wondered about the use of "to use" and other verbs when expressing the purpose of an action. I noticed that purpose is often expressed by having a verb followed by "for" and a progressive ...
0
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0answers
61 views

I saw him going to city. I saw him go to city [duplicate]

1:I saw him going to city. 2:I saw him go to city. First one refers to Gerund. Second one refers to infinite. Do they have the same meanings or changed? Define it with reasons.
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3answers
328 views

Infinitive vs. gerund: is the meaning the same or is infinitive preferential for showing habit?

Is the meaning the same or is infinitive preferential for showing habit? When I pour tea I like to put the milk in first. When I pour tea I like putting the milk in first.
2
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2answers
242 views

Question about the details in meaning between gerund and to-infinite

Consider the following multiple-choice question: The supervisors were asked ______ tasks to new employees so that they could be trained to do them properly. A. Delegate - infinitive B. To delegate - ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

'We'd love to see you joining us as a helper!' or 'We'd love to see you join us as a helper!'

What is better English? 'We'd love to see you joining us as a helper!' or 'We'd love to see you join us as a helper!' What is the rule? Edit: Also, after Joe's comment, I should add that I'd ...
1
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1answer
343 views

Which one is correct: “to have verbed” or “verbing”?

I have two confusing sentences and I am in two minds whether the first or the second is more grammatically correct: He was by far the most knowledgeable person to have commented on the subject, so it ...
1
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4answers
13k views

“spent a lot of time to shop” vs. “spent a lot of time shopping”

She spends a lot of time to shop. She spends a lot of time shopping. Are both of these sentences grammatically correct and do they have the same meaning?
1
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1answer
2k views

“spent a lot of money to buy a house” vs. “spent a lot of money buying a house”

He spent a lot of money to buy a house. He spent a lot of money buying a house. In my head both of the sentences are correct. What's the difference between these sentences?
1
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3answers
81k views

You're welcome, it's been my pleasure helping you out?

Is it correct to say: You're welcome, it has been my pleasure helping you out! Or is this more correct: You're welcome, it has been my pleasure to help you out! Or are both fine?
0
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1answer
633 views

Gerund vs infinitive paraphrase

Is there any difference between these two sentences: "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, discouraging rich people from voting for them" "The Democrats tend to increase taxes, which discourages ...
2
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1answer
5k views

Verb + to infinitive or Verb + …ing [duplicate]

Is there a general rule whether to use the Verb + to infinitive or the Verb + ...ing format? There are cases in which I can't decide which one to use. Like: -They can't afford to go out very often. ...
8
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10answers
20k views

“To include” vs. “including”

In the hot story of today (the U.S. Senate report on "Enhanced Interrogation Techniques"), I noticed the following: He was subjected to numerous and repeated torture techniques, to include being ...
1
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2answers
458 views

What is the fundamental difference between these two sentences

He donated a million dollars for keeping the tigers alive. He donated a million dollars to keep the tigers alive.
12
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3answers
587k views

“Sorry for bothering you” vs. “sorry to bother you” [closed]

Is it grammatically OK to use "Sorry for bothering you"? I often hear "Sorry to bother you".
0
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1answer
2k views

“I don't want him knowing…” vs. “I don't want him to know… ” [duplicate]

There is some dialogue in a movie I saw: I don't want him knowing about this. I always thought it was I don't want him to know about this. I've been confused for days. What is the difference ...
-1
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2answers
8k views

going + ing vs going + infinitive, when use which?

In the middle of a conversation I should use which of the follow sentences: Tomorrow, I'm going climbing. or Tomorrow, I'm going to climb. I did a deep search and I found these similar answers,...
2
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4answers
23k views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
0
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0answers
146 views

I don't like [you to go there] [duplicate]

I don’t like you going there. I don’t like you to go there. Like can take both -ing and a to-infinitive as complement. But can the expression that the matrix subject and the subject of to-...
0
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1answer
6k views

“Curious to learn” vs. “curious to learning”

I know that in case of "looking forward to" I have to use the gerund form. So e.g. I am looking forward to hearing from you. Now I am not sure about this sentence: I am always curious to ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

“Go a long way to” + gerund vs infinitive

Which one is correct? If they all are correct, which construction is the most preferable? Why? The fund will go a long way to solving their problem. The fund will go a long way to solve their problem....
1
vote
1answer
788 views

Why is “in the catching of” wrong?

In this sentence, in the catching of is grammatically incorrect, but I cannot tell how: The new system, which uses remote cameras in the catching of speeding motorists, may undermine the police ...
0
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1answer
2k views

“but, except, besides”?

When learning the infinitive construction, my teacher told us that if “but, except, besides” serves as a preposition and before them there exists “do” or its other forms (did, does), “but, except, ...
9
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2answers
6k views

Difference between a gerund acting as subject and an infinitive acting as a subject?

I am wondering whether there is any difference between a gerund acting as subject and an infinitive acting as a subject.
5
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4answers
775 views

“Not to want someone doing something.” What shade of meaning is attached to using the gerund rather than infinitive?

On page 137 of First Certificate Trainer by Peter May (Cambridge Books for Cambridge Exams), the last paragraph in Test 4, Use of English Part 2 (a cloze test on a short text entitled Safe camping), ...